The Pattern Seekers: How Autism Drives Human Invention

The Pattern Seekers: How Autism Drives Human Invention

In The Pattern Seekers, Cambridge University psychologist Simon Baron-Cohen makes a case that autism is as crucial to our creative and cultural history as the mastery of fire. Indeed, Baron-Cohen argues that autistic people have played a key role in human progress for seventy thousand years, from the first tools to the digital revolution. How? Because the same genes that ca In The Pattern Seekers, Cambridge University psychologist Simon Baron-Cohen makes a case that autism is as crucial ...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Pattern Seekers: How Autism Drives Human Invention
Author:Simon Baron-Cohen
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:The Pattern Seekers: How Autism Drives Human Invention
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:272 pages pages

The Pattern Seekers: How Autism Drives Human Invention Reviews

  • Bruin Mccon
    Jan 21, 2021
    The theory of Pattern Seekers is that a pattern-seeking brain, often seen in autistic people, was natural selection (a.k.a., autistic brains were an advantage) encouraging innovation and invention. This is totally plausible and probably could have been a journal article vs. an entir...
  • Oxana Tomova
    Jul 21, 2020
    The Pattern Seekers takes a close look at the human ability to systematise and thus invent, and draws a parallel with autistic people, many of whom fall into the category of (extreme) systemizers. While I find the subject of the book quite intriguing, I felt like the book wasn't ...
  • Kristine
    Nov 10, 2020
    The Pattern Seekers by Simon Baron-Cohen is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early November. Baron-Cohen theorizes that pattern-seeking is an evolved human response and accurately describes the consistency, even-mindedness, and sense of complete cohesion that those on the autis...
  • Brian Clegg
    Nov 23, 2020
    There are two main concepts in this book - one is that the thing that makes humans special is what Simon Baron-Cohen refers to as a systemizing mechanism in the brain, and the other is that two of the spectra all humans sit on is how much we are systemizers and how much we are empathis...
  • Owlseyes
    Dec 09, 2020
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/08/bo... https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/08/bo... ...more ...
  • Nostalgia Reader
    Oct 17, 2020
    Definitely MUCH more clinical than I thought it would be. I only read the first two chapters (about 20%) and did the little quiz charts at the end. I was jarred by the assumed strict dichotomy between systematizers (those who seek patterns) and empathizers--I apparently am a Type S, wh...
  • Theresa
    Jan 14, 2021
    While I don't think I have autism, I believe I am closer to that end of the spectrum. So I tried to take the SQ and EQ tests on pages 178-9. Unfortunately, I discovered a flaw in the scoring of the tests. Perhaps the publisher should hire autistic people to the the proof reading a...
  • Darren Jones
    Dec 18, 2020
    Honestly a little disappointed in this. I went in with high hopes but it felt very padded. The author himself said he could have summed it up far more quickly but his publisher wanted a book. What could have been a nice little read exploring how society has depended on neurodiversity t...
  • Suzie
    Jan 20, 2021
    Fascinating research on how the human brain works. Describes specific gifts that some, diagnosed as "autistic," have that enable inventions. Highlights inventors throughout history. Fascinating research on how the human brain works. Describes specific gifts that some, diag...
  • Gavin Felgate
    Feb 13, 2021
    Simon Baron-Cohen (brother of Sacha) works at Cambridge University, as a Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, in the Autistm Research Centre. This book is all about different types of autistic mind (mostly focusing on "hyper-systemisers"), and the abilities of those wit...
  • Jeff
    Jul 08, 2020
    Intriguing Theory. Full disclosure up front: I *am* Autistic, and thus these types of books tend to demand my attention as I attempt to understand my own mind and body. That noted, Baron-Cohen (no apparent relation to the actor of the same surname) here proposes a theory that those who...
  • William Ash
    Nov 21, 2020
    I enjoyed Pattern Seekers. It presents a concise introduction to Baron-Cohen's work in his Extreme Male Brain theory and his empathizing/systematizing hypothesis. Basically, the ability to invent, which is defined as a iterative process of not only identifying a particular discove...
  • Jeannette
    Aug 22, 2020
    Full disclosure: I received The Pattern Seekers: How Autism Drives Human Invention by Simon Baron-Cohen from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for possibly writing a review. I was really interested in this book because my brother is on the autism spectrum, and I am always try...
  • April Taylor
    Sep 14, 2020
    I am autistic, but this book just frustrated me. Primarily that?s because the author kept hammering it home again and again that animals can?t experiment, don?t have a theory of mind, etc. This may not have been proven conclusively to be false yet, but it has been shown to be in ...
  • Pirooz
    Dec 20, 2020
    Outstanding Well researched, clearly written and thought provoking. The title got my interest and the content kept it. Those who may not be as interested in the rationale or logic of the theory maybe not as interested in some of the middle chapters but worth to get through particul...
  • Anne
    Jan 30, 2021
    The author explains that inventors share traits that people with autism have. Not all inventors are autistic, and not all people with autism are inventors. I agree with the author's conclusion that people with autism do need to be more integrated fully into society, and that educa...
  • Johnny Andrade
    Nov 14, 2020
    I really loved this awesome book. Psychology professor, and leading expert in Autism research, Simon Baron-Cohen, is one of my favorite authors. I preordered this book earlier this year and have been excitedly waiting for it come. This is definitely one of my top favorite books now. ...
  • MH
    Dec 20, 2020
    For anyone wondering, the author is Sascha's cousin. Interesting theory about neurodiversity and how the tendency to have a brain partial to systematizing (vs empathizing) is linked to autism. By empathizing, the author is referring to theory of mind rather than caring about peo...
  • Andrew Miller
    Jan 20, 2021
    An interesting read with some excellent points in support of neurodiversity but as an autistic person I disagree with the assertion that: "A diagnosis should only be restricted to those who are struggling as a result of their autism." Society needs a true reflection of the ex...
  • Rebeca Núñez
    Jul 24, 2020
    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for provide me with a digital copy in exchange for my honest review. Muy interesante e informative. Creo que la mayoria desconocemos un 100% que es lo que realmente implica ser una persona con esta patologa e incluso como tratar con una, o que ...
  • Roy Foley
    Dec 17, 2020
    It's a very good theory with sound reasoning, I do feel he may have glossed over the four other main theories of invention really too rapidly. I loved some of the ideas about the education system, some of which are implemented in special schools already with some amazing outcome...
  • Henry Percy
    Feb 08, 2021
    Page nos. refer to the hardback version, which I borrowed from my library. I sent these observations to Mr. Baron-Cohen but have not heard back. If he replies I will update this. Page 21 Stonehenge was built 5019 years ago? What?s the secret of such remarkably precise dating? ...
  • Kay's Pallet
    Jan 20, 2021
    This book was really interesting. Definitely a different look on autism. ...
  • Lee W
    Dec 22, 2020
    As a ?successful? autistic man, I was attracted to the premise of this book. However, I found it both highly repetitive and extremely didactic. In addition to the repetition, the fact that about a third of the book is essentially appendices, raises a few questions for me. I?...
  • Patrick Hurley
    Nov 18, 2020
    This book is an odd one...it's sort of fragmented and jumps around a bit. The claims are also a bit strong for my taste (as a fellow academic). The book starts off with an interesting compare/contrast with two individuals who are "pattern seekers" and cleanly lays ou...
  • Jenna Michelle Pink
    Aug 31, 2020
    The Pattern Seekers by Simon Baron-Cohen review. I request this book on @netgalley last month. As an autistic person the title jumped out at me and I wanted to know more, although I admit I was quite dubious about what the content might entail due to its author. Simon Baron-Coh...
  • Fred Jones
    Nov 07, 2020
    The argument that autism drive human invention is basically the same argument as that which was presented by Steven Sielberman in Neurotribes. It is of course true but it is nothing new As for the actual title, that idea is taken from Uta Frith, his PhD supervisor and the correlatio...
  • Fred Smith
    Nov 15, 2020
    It repeats information in other books ...
  • Alessa
    Jan 26, 2021
    ...
  • Otolith Library
    Feb 07, 2021
    Autism is not a category, it's a continuum. Baron-Cohen identifies different preferences: empathizers, balancers, and systemizers. Learn from an expert on the value of systemizing versus empathy. We have integrated this book in a blog https://www.otolith.be/2020/12/misfit... ...