The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944

The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERIn the second volume of his epic trilogy about the liberation of Europe in World War II, Pulitzer Prize winner Rick Atkinson tells the harrowing story of the campaigns in Sicily and ItalyIn An Army at Dawn?winner of the Pulitzer Prize?Rick Atkinson provided a dramatic and authoritative history of the Allied triumph in North Africa. Now, in The Day NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERIn the second volume of his epic trilogy about the liberation of Europe in World War II, Puli...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944
Author:Rick Atkinson
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:793 pages pages

The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944 Reviews

  • George
    Nov 29, 2007
    Wonderfully written and researched. An extremely fine companion book to the Army at Dawn, which covered the US Army in North Africa. The author spends lavish amounts of time trying to create context and color, so much so it overwhelms at times. One of the interesting points throughout ...
  • Howard Cincotta
    Jul 16, 2015
    I read much of Day of Battle, second in Rick Atkinson?s stirring Liberation Trilogy, with an odd mix of anticipation and dread. Anticipation because, as a history of the World War II campaigns in Sicily and Italy, we know how the story ends. But also dread, because we can foresee the...
  • Christopher
    Jul 08, 2008
    Atkinson gets better in the second installment of his Liberation Trilogy. Yes, this book is hefty, both physically and mentally. The Italian Campaign was the closest that the Western Allies came to WWI-style attritional warfare. The frustration at the stalemate in front of Cassino a...
  • Tripp
    Feb 03, 2008
    If you read books about the Second World War, put Rick Atkinson's The Day of Battle at the top of your pile. If you don't, this is a great place to start. The focus of the book is on the American Army experience in Sicily and Italy from 1943-44. The British, Polish, Canadian, Free Fren...
  • Curtiss
    Sep 12, 2008
    The second volume in Rick Atkinson's Liberation Trilogy; I can hardly wait for volume three. This volume deals with the second year of the war in the Mediterranean, including the invasions of Sicily, Salerno, and Anzio; ending with the capture of Rome the day before the Normandy lan...
  • Matt
    Mar 30, 2014
    ?Secrecy was paramount. [Admiral H. Kent] Hewitt doubted that three thousand vessels could sneak up on Sicily, but [Operation] Husky?s success relied on surprise. All documents that disclosed the invasion destination were stamped with the classified code word Bigot, and sentries at...
  • William
    Nov 18, 2008
    "Day of Battle" by Rick Atkinson is volume II of his "Liberation Trilogy," a retelling of the US involvement in WWII that welds lyrical prose with detailed narrative. For Atkinson, writing a book on Sicily and Italy is a tough deal, as it is the lackluster mid-point between North...
  • Steven Peterson
    Sep 26, 2009
    This is a detailed work showing the horrors of battles in Sicily and Italy in World War II. Gruesome details provide a ring of truth in this well researched volume. The work also demonstrates the genuine heroism that took place. The "soft underbelly of Europe," to use Churchill's terms...
  • A. L. Sowards
    Mar 19, 2012
    The allied campaign in Italy could be summed up in one quote, spoken by a general from New Zealand after studying a failed American attempt to breach the Rapido river, ?Nothing was right except the courage.? What went wrong? Plenty. Cassino. Security lapses. Malaria. Italy?s t...
  • Sue
    Oct 03, 2009
    I actually liked this book better than his first in this 3-part series (the third book is still pending at this time). I delves deeply into the theories, planning, scheming, folly, tragedy, valor, and pyrrhic success of the battles in Sicily and Italy. Not only does it touch on more fa...
  • David
    Oct 29, 2009
    "The Day of Battle" is the second volume of Rick Atkinson's Liberation Trilogy. The first volume, "An Army at Dawn", which won the 2003 Pulitzer for History, covered the 1942-43 Allied invasion of North Africa. This second volume deals with the 1943-44 invasion of Sicily and Italy. The...
  • Mark
    May 12, 2019
    Meticulously researched Rick Atkinson provides a highly readable narrative of the fighting in Sicily and Italy, in 1943-44, in which my father participated as a member of the Fourth Indian Division, 1st Field Artillery. Called up in 1939, Father had reached the rank of Major and wa...
  • Rob
    Jun 20, 2017
    Finely crafted account of a campaign neglected by popular history writers. As in the first title in the series, we're privey to accounts of the struggle from all ranks, from Churchill and Clark down to captains and privates. And like an Army at Dawn, this is no reverential hagiography....
  • Bob Mobley
    Feb 09, 2011
    This is the second volume of Rick Atkinson's "Liberation Trilogy," and follows An Army At Dawn. The Day of Battle is an interesting and fascinating account of the campaigns in Sicily and Italy during 1943 - 1944. Atkinson makes this story compelling, illuminating, personal and revealin...
  • Mal Warwick
    Mar 24, 2014
    ?The fog of war.? This phrase, introduced by the Prussian military strategist Carl von Clausewitz in a book published in 1837, years after his death, is generally taken to mean that, in war, uncertainty and confusion demand fast and flexible thinking of military commanders. In R...
  • Checkman
    Jul 15, 2012
    Good military history. Nothing really new covered here and the book ends in the spring of 1944 with just a cursory look at the last year of the Italian Campaign. Why? Because this is the second chapter of a trilogy about the liberation of Europe from the Nazi yoke. The real meat and...
  • John Nellis
    Apr 11, 2011
    This was a very interesting and informative history of the Italian campaign. I haven't read a lot of books about the war in Italy, other than books about the Cassino battles, and Anzio. I always had the intention of learning more about this campaign as a whole, and Rick Atkinson did a ...
  • Gary Butler
    May 29, 2017
    37th book read in 2017. Number 518 out of 602 on my all time book list. ...
  • Clyde
    Jul 29, 2013
    The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944 is the second book in Rick Atkinson's three-part history of World War II. It picks up pretty much right where An Army at Dawn: The War in North Africa, 1942-1943 ends. The battle for Italy was one of the toughest of the war. By...
  • Brian
    Jul 05, 2013
    You can't fault Rick Atkinson for the amount of research he does. He pores through histories, letters, diaries and battle reports. The result is a full, although at times overly detailed history of the allied taking of Sicily and Italy during World War Two. He quotes not just what sold...
  • Michael Burhans
    Sep 23, 2013
    The second book in the Liberation Trilogy is, surprisingly, even better than the first one. I would not have thought that was possible. These books are about history, history that is for the large part well known. There is no mystery as to who is going to win the war. My father fought...
  • Michael Gerald
    Jan 03, 2012
    War is such a nasty business, that it is almost unthinkable to write about a real war in great prose. But Rick Atkinson did it in this book about the liberation of Sicily and Italy in 1943-1944. Following in the tradition of fine writing of the likes of Cornelius Ryan, Stephen Ambro...
  • Rebecca Wilson
    Oct 12, 2017
    Sicily and Italy was a huge gap in my WWII knowledge, so I'm glad to have read this. Friends, it wasn't easy. This was a hard go. Throughout the book Atkinson shows?and then actually says at the very end?that the Italian front was the aspect of the war that most closely resemble...
  • Donna
    Jul 30, 2014
    This is the second book in Rick Atkinson?s WWII Liberation trilogy. I felt the same way about this one that I felt for his first oneAn Army at Dawn: The War in North Africa, 1942-1943. For this book being a non-fiction book, he does a great job at not just regurgitating the facts he ...
  • John
    Jul 27, 2013
    Atkinson is quickly becoming my favorite military historian. We'll get to him the writer in a bit, but let's first focus on this masterpiece first. I would argue, somewhat arbitrarily as it doesn't really matter, that this book is better than An Army At Dawn, the first book of the Libe...
  • Dj
    Nov 16, 2016
    A book I might have ranked higher if I was more into the writing style. Although I might have ranked it lower if it hadn't been such a clearly presented view of what is normally a very difficult subject to write about. Italy is never an easy read and sometimes the books on the subject ...
  • Dimitri
    Dec 21, 2018
    Like the army under narration, Atkinson has grown into his role. Amidst the anekdotes, the overall military situation stands out clearer, especially the looming demands of a Normandy landings for both shipping and veteran units. The German propaganda leaflet (discussed both in the pict...
  • Rick Riordan
    Dec 20, 2013
    The follow-up to Atkinson's An Army at Dawn, The Day of Battle covers the Allied invasion of Sicily and Italy from 1943-1944. I knew little about this front, as it often gets eclipsed by the later invasion of France. It was fascinating to follow the internal struggles between the Amer...
  • Michael Finocchiaro
    May 23, 2017
    While as well researched as An Army At Dawn, I found myself struggling with The Day of Battle - perhaps because of the brutality of this phase of the war which cost most casualties than the North African phase. Atkinson goes into excruciating detail about all the blunders: poor logisti...
  • Dax
    Aug 21, 2018
    The second leg of the Liberation Trilogy. Atkinson continues to impress with his ability to put all of this information down without overwhelming the reader. The maps certainly help, but Atkinson knows how to construct a narrative and the writing is a real pleasure. That's probably wha...