Cahokia: Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi

Cahokia: Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi

The fascinating story of a lost city and an unprecedented American civilization While Mayan and Aztec civilizations are widely known and documented, relatively few people are familiar with the largest prehistoric Native American city north of Mexico - a site that expert Timothy Pauketat brings vividly to life in this groundbreaking book. Almost a thousand years ago, a city The fascinating story of a lost city and an unprecedented American civilization While Mayan and Aztec civiliz...

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Title:Cahokia: Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi
Author:Timothy R. Pauketat
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:Cahokia: Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:194 pages pages

Cahokia: Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi Reviews

  • valpal
    Aug 10, 2009
    Fascinating book about the discovery and archeology of the Cahokia sites. I didn't know much about this preColumbian site and found it quite interesting. ...
  • Lisa
    Mar 21, 2015
    Wonderful book for non-archaeologists about this extraordinary place in the middle of America that was once the site of America's first city. ...
  • Nathan Albright
    Dec 18, 2016
    I feel torn about this book. On the one hand, I am likely one of the few people outside of the St. Louis metroplex who has pondered the fate of Cahokia [1]. On the one hand, I find that this book exposes a great deal of the double standard that exists when it comes to defending the cul...
  • Keith Akers
    Dec 01, 2009
    Writing style isn't like the DaVinci Code, but maybe that's a good thing. It does a good, clear job of explaining the whole history of Cahokia that we know of, cutting back and forth from the present to the past. The history of the archeological excavations, with some sites lost to "pr...
  • Liz
    Oct 14, 2009
    A great city, huge temples, a large central playing field, planned communities built on the rubble of previous towns, outlying communities where immigrant labor, poorly fed, work fields of corn to feed the urbanites: urbanization, urban renewal, immigrant labor - it's all here, startin...
  • Jonna Higgins-Freese
    Sep 26, 2015
    "The findings at Cahokia call into question some long-held beliefs -- for instance, that ecologically sensitive, peaceful, mystical and egalitarian peoples freely roamed the North American continent, never overpopulating or overexploiting their environments . . . and that they could no...
  • Barnaby Thieme
    Dec 06, 2012
    This book tells the wrong story, devoting most of its short length to the excavation of Cahokia by generations of researchers, and offering the reader little information about the site itself. It's a very odd decision. I don't know if Pauketat, himself an academic and excavator, be...
  • Unwisely
    Nov 04, 2009
    So, right, a book about Native American History in the US. I'm somewhat better on pre-Columbian Latin American history, but after reading this I have determined it's possible that I don't know anything because no one knows that much, not just because I'm an ignoramus. Anyway, this i...
  • Alex
    Mar 11, 2013
    I was hoping for solid info. about Hopewell mounds, artifacts, and culture and was disappointed with the scant info. about ancient America. It had a few morsels but was lacking. ...
  • Elizabeth K.
    Aug 10, 2009
    I will always remember my Time-Life Mysteries of the Ancient World book, which featured a misty picture of the Cahokia mounds and informed us that no one knows who built these mysterious mounds, or why, (oooOOOoooOOOOooo) before moving on to Easter Island. Either the Time-Life people w...
  • Steve
    Aug 25, 2017
    Part of the excellent "Penguin Library of American Indian History" series - appropriately this one is written by an archaeological/anthropology scholar Pauketat (who grew up near the site, in Belleville, IL). That he was able to summarize all the recent (last 50 years, or so) finds and...
  • Michael Tildsley
    May 08, 2018
    This book was fascinating from cover to cover. The history of America mixing with the pre-Columbian history of North America cross paths within the pages. I found the book and the Cahokians haunting in a way. As the author described the history of the findings at the dig sites, I found...
  • Timothy Corrigan
    Nov 04, 2009
    The hell if I knew that the ruins of an eleventh-century metropolis sits across the river from St. Louis. Unfortunately, what remains was built with earth, and the convening years have not been kind (though the lumpen, eroded sadness which is the central pyramid mound can still boast b...
  • Richard Derus
    Jun 14, 2011
    Rating: 3.5* of five The Publisher Says: Almost a thousand years ago, a Native American city flourished along the Mississippi River near what is now St. Louis. Cahokia was a thriving metropolis at its height with a population of twenty thousand, a sprawling central plaza, and scores...
  • Mallory
    Aug 20, 2018
    After visiting the Etowah Indian Mounds site in Georgia earlier this summer, I was inspired to pick up this book that had been sitting on my shelf for awhile. I readily admit I do not know much American history that is pre-European. This was an interesting look into what an active, vib...
  • Christina
    Mar 02, 2019
    A few weeks ago, I attended a lecture by Aaron Deter-Wolf, a Prehistoric Archaeologist at the TN Division of Archaeology on recent discoveries using modern technology at the Mound Bottom State Archaeological Area in Harpeth River State Park near Nashville, TN. He mentioned the site was...
  • Carol Storm
    Nov 22, 2013
    What I wanted was more than just a bunch of boring stories about excavations at the Cahokia mounds near St. Louis. I wanted something like a vivid recreation of the long-forgotten past. Thousands of warriors dancing in colorful costumes up and down the pyramid stairs! Beautiful maidens...
  • Karen Cox
    Oct 11, 2011
    This is an excellent discussion of the most important pre-Columbian site north of the Rio Grande. The writer describes the process of digging the site and explains how the dig results show what life was like when the city flourished. I particularly like the fact that he's not inclined ...
  • Paul
    Jul 10, 2012
    I was hoping to read more about Cahokia itself as it was, but it felt like more than half of the book was actually dedicated to the story of the archaeologists who uncovered various parts of it. It's nice to know about, I guess, but as a non-archaeologist I had a hard time visualizing ...
  • Terri
    Dec 15, 2018
    Continuing my journey to understand pre-Columbian history, I thought it was time to go back to my Illinois roots. Somehow, I made it through growing up in the Chicago suburbs in the 1980s without more than a passing reference to the Cahokia mounds and an idea of the scale of politics t...
  • Rick
    Sep 01, 2019
    Cahokia is an excellent book about a period in First Nations history in North America that receives too little attention. Cahokia was a city on the Mississippi River that developed suddenly (by historical standards) in the 1050s CE. The city reached a population of 10,000, plus another...
  • Robert Seitz
    Jan 08, 2019
    Still finishing up with this one, but it seems something clear popped up to say about this easy to digest, thin book. We think we're so smart. It's our biggest bias... that we know what's going on with other people! We think that ancient times are so far away, the people impossible ...
  • Judy
    Mar 10, 2015
    I got through this book but it was a struggle. Maybe this was intended for readers who already knew something about these people. Very dry reading. ...
  • Rossdavidh
    Aug 28, 2017
    About a week ago, I visited Cahokia Mounds museum and archaeological site in southeastern Illinois. It was the site of the Cahokian Native American urban area, a planned city founded around 1050 A.D., that fell and disappeared prior to the arrival of European settlers, and thus has bee...
  • Sandra Snook
    May 04, 2019
    4 stars for the intriguing content. This is my ?Illinois? book for my 50-state challenge this year. Last year I read The Nix which was a contemporary novel. This year I went back to ~1200 CE to read more about one of the most complex native cities in all of the Americas. This fille...
  • Marie Carmean
    Nov 10, 2018
    Fascinating research about the pre-Columbian indigenous people of North America who settled the Plains. I enjoyed reading about the archaeological finds at Chahokia, a huge mound complex almost lost in modern development near St. Louis. It had a major impact on the peoples of the Plain...
  • Bob Newman
    Nov 16, 2017
    Of mounds and men Over the course of my life I'd heard about "Mound Builders", about a city somewhere in the Mid-West built by Indians, and seen a few odd photos of objects found in the mounds that were located out there somewhere. I never really put it all together. Now, thanks, to...
  • Mike Renz
    Dec 03, 2018
    As a person with an interest in both history and indigenous cultures, I was startled by my own ignorance regarding this remarkable culture and the engineered structures they left behind. It was fascinating to see the link between this culture along the Mississippi and that of Chaco Can...
  • Emma OBrien
    Feb 14, 2019
    A fascinating account of a civilization I knew nothing about, despite having a BA in History and Urban Studies. I can't believe this history is not more widely known and taught in the US. ...
  • Anson Cassel Mills
    Jun 15, 2019
    Writing a book on Cahokia reminds me of Samuel Johnson?s famous quip about a dog walking on its hind legs. The observer is not surprised that the dog doesn?t walk on his hind legs very well; he?s surprised that the dog can walk on his hind legs at all. Because Cahokia flourished ...