The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History 1300-1850

The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History 1300-1850

The Little Ice Age tells the story of the turbulent, unpredictable, and often very cold years of modern European history, how this altered climate affected historical events, and what it means for today's global warming. Building on research that has only recently confirmed that the world endured a 500year cold snap, renowned archaeologist Brian Fagan shows how the increas The Little Ice Age tells the story of the turbulent, unpredictable, and often very cold years of modern European history,...

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Title:The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History 1300-1850
Author:Brian M. Fagan
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Genres:History
ISBN:The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History, 1300-1850
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:272 pages pages

The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History 1300-1850 Reviews

  • George
    Mar 20, 2017
    I found this combination of history and climate and how they interact fascinating. It is also a bit depressing. This is an account of the turbulent, unpredictable, and often very cold years from 1300 - 1850, known as "The Little Ice Age," in European history and how this altered climat...
  • Jessica
    Sep 21, 2007
    The amount of time Fagan must have spent in dark and dusty European archives blows my mind. His research uncovers forgotten records in amazing detail. Unfortunately, the book could use an equally fastidious editor. Very interesting, if poorly organized. I still recommend it, though! ...
  • Sarah
    Apr 17, 2009
    Technically I did not finish this, since I had to take it back to the library before I could finish the last three chapters, but I did skim them. So, I read this book. In its entirety. Don't try to talk me out of it. Very informative! It seems that weather gets ignored a lot in hist...
  • Bibliophile
    Mar 26, 2009
    Brian M. Fagan's The Little Ice Age is a fascinating general history of Europe that focuses on the role of climate change (specifically, the five and a half centuries of extreme cold and unsettled weather that affected Northern Europe from 1300 to 1850.) The book is strongest when Faga...
  • Kristin
    May 01, 2013
    I'm a climatologist reading a book on climate by an anthropologist, so I'm going to be skeptical. I enjoyed the history of agricultural development in Europe and the North Atlantic, especially passages such as this: "Filthy, clad in rags, barely surviving on a diet of bread, cheese,...
  • Dana Stabenow
    Oct 10, 2008
    A dossier on a 550-year European cold snap compiled from tree rings, ice cores, and the accounts of country clergymen and gentlemen scientists. Do we make the weather, or does it make us? Because the Arctic ice pack receded during the Medieval Warm Period, Fagan writes, the Vikings ...
  • Victor Sonkin
    Dec 30, 2018
    A good account of the Little Ice Age; it could be better both from the scientific point of view and from the entertainment POV, but as a primer it's definitely okay. ...
  • Tim Martin
    Aug 30, 2012
    _The Little Ice Age_ by Brian Fagan is a fascinating, very readable, and well researched book on the science and history of a particular period of climatic history, the "Little Ice Age," which lasted approximately from 1300 to 1850. Despite the name, the Little Ice Age (a term coined b...
  • Sandra Strange
    Oct 01, 2009
    So often the forces that shape history are barely acknowledged in history courses. Here's an example: the little ice age which determined SO MUCH of what happened politically, socially and economically from 1300 to 1850! And as a history major, I had NEVER heard anyone mention it! This...
  • Juliet Wilson
    Oct 29, 2017
    Subtitled 'How Climate Made History 1300 - 1850', this book charts how the mostly cold and often unpredictable climate affected human history, particularly in Europe, over the period often known as the Little Ice Age. Covering events including The French Revolution, The Bubonic Plagues...
  • Libby
    Jan 29, 2010
    I like to think that I know a lot about history. Periodically, authors like Brian Fagan teach me how much more there is to know. This book is bursting with information about how the Medieval period I thought I understood,was formed and influenced by factors I didn't know or didn't unde...
  • Cynthia  Scott
    Mar 04, 2018
    I planned on just skimming this book as I had read it in detail once in 2001-2, and used it as reference several times since. But I became engrossed about half way through and read it well again, today, all day. It is scientifically thorough about pressure highs and lows causing differ...
  • Tony Johnston
    Oct 09, 2017
    I had high hopes for this book but I am sad to say that I found it very tedious. It's not the subject matter, more that it was just poorly written and repetitive. Its a shame because I am definitely the target market for this sort of book. A lovely nerdy subject, a sensible general ...
  • Jack
    May 22, 2017
    Fascinating read on how climate impacted history. I would love to read an updated version of this, since it was written in 2000 and our scientific knowledge has grown since then. ...
  • Don
    Nov 29, 2018
    Before 1988, ?few scientists were actively studying long-term climatic change,? Brian Fagan tells us. Climatologist James Hansen?s testimony before a U.S. Senate committee brought that conversation to a new public prominence that continues to inform and misinform our public deba...
  • Emma Sea
    Jan 31, 2013
    My favourite kind of pop-science writing! This is so easy to read, and supported by a ton of references and further reading without unbearably cluttering up the text. The only part which I'd rate less then 5 stars is the conclusion. I'm not sure if Fagan's publishers wouldn't let him w...
  • Stephen
    Jun 21, 2013
    I recently read Brian Fagan's The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History, 1300-1850. It's an odd blend of history and science, and chronicles a long and weary succession of droughts, famines, plagues, and death. Small wonder the Calvinists subscribed to such a vicious god: if I'd liv...
  • Richard Reese
    Mar 22, 2015
    Once upon a time, Brian Fagan became curious about how history has been shaped by climate. He did a remarkable amount of research, and then delivered a fascinating and very readable book, The Little Ice Age. Mainstream history tends to focus on rulers, empires, wars, and technology, pr...
  • Julien Rapp
    Oct 08, 2017
    Is climate change real? Of course, it is. The earth is a dynamic place. The sun is a dynamic star. The universe itself is ever changing. I am writing this as a review of three books I have reread this year. Two are by Brian Fagan, and one by Steven Mithen. They cover ice ages, warming...
  • Caroline Caldwell
    Aug 08, 2013
    A well researched, but definitely biased, look at the interaction between humans and the natural world we inhabit. I felt a little talked down to and manipulated by the direction of the narrative, but the facts are interesting. I just wish he would have left out the diatribe at the end...
  • Donald Luther
    Aug 02, 2018
    I wish I had read this book back when I was teaching my AP European History course. I would recount the years of crop failures leading up to the French Revolution (often contrasting those years in France with the much more favorable weather across the Channel, allowing the English to a...
  • Vadim Yapiyev
    Apr 30, 2019
    It is a good start to learn about Little Ice age. ...
  • Cynda
    Nov 23, 2016
    This is the first book I have read by Brian Fagan. I will be reading more. Fagan points out that no respectable historian would say that weather created political revolutions or population movements, but there are connections. The particularly cold and wet weather often experienced be...
  • John Szalasny
    Jan 18, 2018
    Despite the age of the book, The Little Ice Age is an excellent reverse road map of the issues we will face as global warming ramps up throughout the 21st century. It is a tale of how humans in our recent past have had to deal withwildly fluctuating temperature and precipitation patter...
  • Joseph Carrabis
    Aug 31, 2019
    1) My god what a book. 2) My god what a book. 3) My god what a book. I picked up The Little Ice Age because I?ve thoroughly enjoyed everything I?ve read by Brian Fagan and this book keeps me enjoying his work. It?s a wonderful read that?s just the other side of popsci; it ma...
  • Erik Walker
    Feb 11, 2018
    I enjoyed this book and the perspective it gave me on history and climate change. Written in 2000, it would seem to be 'dated' about current climate problems, but not really, and the focus is on the Little Ice Age (1300-1850), so whatever this lacks in the new information from the tech...
  • Chris Young
    Jul 04, 2019
    I never gave any consideration to weather and its capacity to influence certain major human events. Thanks to technological advances, only recently have scientists been able accurately assess historical weather patterns with any reasonable degree of accuracy. In this book Fagan does a ...
  • Nathan Clarke
    Nov 04, 2018
    Written by a historian, not a scientist. Which means most of the science related to climate is a bit weak, but the history is fine. I enjoyed learning more about the lives of those in Europe during these 5 centuries. This brings up one issue is the lack of climate related history from ...
  • Pandit
    Aug 23, 2019
    This book is about the 'little ice age'; what, I thought, was a period of cold weather which recently gave way in the 1880's to the current warm and benign climate. This is a crucial period, because if indeed there was a GLOBAL 'little ice age' then current warming is quite within ...
  • Casey
    May 11, 2019
    Though I often did not follow his technical ideas, I still gave this book 5 stars because, after the many books I've read about history, none of them credited climate for its huge effects. Only individual weather events on occasion, like the Russian winter that defeated Napoleon and Hi...