We Have Always Been Here: A Queer Muslim Memoir

We Have Always Been Here: A Queer Muslim Memoir

How do you find yourself when the world tells you that you don't exist? Samra Habib has spent most of her life searching for the safety to be herself. As an Ahmadi Muslim growing up in Pakistan, she faced regular threats from Islamic extremists who believed the small, dynamic sect to be blasphemous. From her parents, she internalized the lesson that revealing her identity How do you find yourself when the world tells you that you don't exist? Samra Habib has spent most of her life ...

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Title:We Have Always Been Here: A Queer Muslim Memoir
Author:Samra Habib
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:B07KDW7KVZ
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:226 pages pages

We Have Always Been Here: A Queer Muslim Memoir Reviews

  • Marie-Therese
    Aug 03, 2019
    3.5 stars overall, although the first third of the book is considerably stronger, fresher, and more interesting than the rest. ...
  • Lacey
    Jun 01, 2019
    I had to take some time to process my thoughts on this book. I received a copy of this book from NetGalley for review purposes and all thoughts expressed in this review are my own. This book left me in tears. Like, all out sobbing tears. I?m so glad that this memoir was written...
  • Jessica
    Aug 09, 2019
    I managed to misinterpret the description of this to such an extent that I spent the first half of the book wondering when the author was going to start talking about queerness. But her narrative of her experiences growing up Ahmadi (a religious minority) in Lahore, then fleeing the co...
  • Basma
    Feb 05, 2019
    I have been a fan of Samra Habib's work since a few years back. I think I first stumbled upon her writing in The Guardian and later found myself on tumblr looking at her photo projects. So you can say that I went into this with a little bias and curiosity to know more about her, her wo...
  • Erin
    Jul 20, 2019
    ?Our understanding of the interior lives of those who are not like us is contingent on their ability to articulate themselves in a language we know. The further removed people are from proficiency in that language, the less likely they are to be understood as complex individuals. The...
  • Bethany
    Jul 11, 2019
    This is a valuable book, and while I liked it I wished that it went deeper. I feel like there's so much about the author I don't know. Maybe she wrote as much as she was able to at this time. ...
  • Susan
    May 30, 2019
    While I enjoyed learning about Ms. Habib and would love to see her photography, I would not say this book was much of an exploration as stated in the summary. For despite being presented as a memoir, I felt it was much more of an objective stating of the facts of Ms. Habib's life and g...
  • Laurie • The Baking Bookworm
    Jul 19, 2019
    4.5 STARS - This is an honest and revealing coming-of-age memoir of a queer Muslim woman's struggle with identity, faith and family. Beginning with her childhood as a young Ahmadi Muslim in Pakistan and continuing into her adult life as a successful photojournalist in Toronto, Habib de...
  • gillyweed
    Sep 25, 2019
    Unquestionably an essential addition to every queer bookshelf. File next to Audre Lorde. ...
  • CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian
    Jul 11, 2019
    An amazing memoir. Habib recounts her childhood as an Ahmadi Muslim in Pakistan, where her family had to hide to stay safe in the face of Islamic extremists and then how this pattern of hiding combined with sexism and homophobia followed her to Canada, where she felt forced to hide her...
  • hayls
    Aug 25, 2019
    I positively inhaled this. It is high time everyone realised that queer Muslims exist. I saw so much of myself in Samra though we are from a different culture and faith tradition - I took about twenty screenshots of quotes which give expression to my own experiences I struggle to d...
  • Lata
    Sep 15, 2019
    Samra Habib's memoir is beautifully written, sometimes raw. She describes her family, and the many rules in place to police a young Pakistani woman in Pakistan. These rules become even more important to her parents when they settle in Canada. (The parental and societal restrictions fel...
  • Ann
    Feb 24, 2019
    There were moments during this book that I felt a little bit nervous (like any time the author mentioned trans people), but overall this was a beautiful portrayal of self-discovery. I have read a lot about queer Christians, but to read about the author's relationship with Islam forced ...
  • Ameema Saeed
    Jun 07, 2019
    4.5 stars. ...
  • Jessica Jane
    Jun 17, 2019
    Easily one of the best books I?ve read all year. Habib?s story is compelling and inspiring, and her writing is magnificent. A very, very good read. ...
  • Madame
    Aug 09, 2019
    Disclaimer: I no longer feel comfortable to rate stars on the accounts of true stories/memoirs. It feels like an unfair judgement. Thank you for net galley and publisher for allowing to an advance copy in exchange for my honest review. Honestly when I first started the book, I th...
  • Sami Eerola
    Aug 06, 2019
    Very moving and inspiring tale of a Muslim girl that finds feminism and then the courage to assert her true identity as a queer Muslim. This is not just a autobiography, but a great book about balancing conflicting identities and loyalties. How to protect your Muslim family from ra...
  • Rita
    Jun 07, 2019
    I picked up this memoir on a whim and am super glad to say that I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was very rewarding reading from a point of view so different from my own and seeing how Habib's faith intersected with her sexuality. I do think that the narrative was a little too loose and did...
  • Khashayar Mohammadi
    Sep 15, 2019
    ESSENTIAL ...
  • Crystal S.
    Aug 18, 2019
    Heartfelt and forthright. ...
  • PhebeAnn
    Sep 07, 2019
    This was a totally engrossing memoir. Great on audiobook, I polished it off in two listens. Samra Habib is someone I'd love to have coffee with. I love the nuance and thoughtfulness with which she reflects on her own experiences, and her relationships with her parents, Islam, Pakist...
  • Fully.Booked
    Aug 10, 2019
    ?????/5! - I?m the first to admit that 9 times out of 10, I?ll choose fiction over nonfiction??? Memoirs can be tricky but I fell in love with this one! I was initially drawn to the cover (I mean, come on?) but i enjoyed it so much more than I thought I would s...
  • Hamza Jahanzeb
    Apr 25, 2019
    Samra Habib provide an honest, raw and gripping account of her life from Pakistan, escaping the clutches of religious intolerance, into a new world in Canada where she and her family sought refuge. It is brilliantly told, with an absolute clear narrative that reads like it's being told...
  • Amanda B
    Sep 10, 2019
    The further removed people are from proficiency in that language, the less likely they are to be understood as complex individuals. We have always been here, it?s just that the world wasn?t ready for us yet. Today, with all the political upheavals in the Muslim world, some of u...
  • Jade
    Aug 01, 2019
    You know it's a good queer religious memoir when it tears open the hole in you where a faith community should be, and still you want to thank the author for it. ...
  • Shawn Sorensen
    Aug 02, 2019
    This is an important book to read as a parent. I actually connected so deeply to the parents, as they navigated how to make their children feel supported for who they are. They make the mistakes I don?t want to make. It?s a powerful and impactful memoir, and I?m glad it was writt...
  • Carlee Beatty
    Oct 05, 2019
    This book was both fantastic and an emotional read for me. I teach at a majority Muslim school, and have seen a wide variety of approaches through which the Islamic community views the queer community. I have seen and read some of my students being openly homophobic and transphobic, ot...
  • Alexandra
    Aug 22, 2019
    I won a copy of the memoir in Goodreads giveaway. My review is my own opinion. With so many bad things happening in our world, we need more books like this one. Stories of personal courage necessary in order to find the happiness you want in life. Samra?s story is incredibly ...
  • Meena Khan
    Apr 19, 2019
    This book is very misleading if you are interested in learning about Islam. Please don't use this book as your reference point. For example, when the writer describes the differences between Shia and Sunni muslims, she does it in a haste without any real, religious knowledge. That whol...
  • Laila
    Jun 10, 2019
    Not sure what to make of this book. It is certainly not a memoir, but more of a paint-by-numbers autobiography (I was born on such and such date, when I was young this happened, then that happened..., etc). And to that end, who is Samra Habib, why should we be interested in *her* life ...