Conscience: The Origins of Moral Intuition

Conscience: The Origins of Moral Intuition

In her brilliant work Touching a Nerve, Patricia S. Churchland, the distinguished founder of neurophilosophy, drew from scientific research on the brain to understand its philosophical and ethical implications for identity, consciousness, free will, and memory. In Conscience, she explores how moral systems arise from our physical selves in combination with environmental de In her brilliant work Touching a Nerve, Patricia S. Churchland, the distinguished founder of neurophilosophy, drew from s...

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Title:Conscience: The Origins of Moral Intuition
Author:Patricia S. Churchland
Rating:
Genres:Philosophy
ISBN:1324000899
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:226 pages pages

Conscience: The Origins of Moral Intuition Reviews

  • Prooost Davis
    Jul 01, 2019
    The title would perhaps more precisely be "The Biological Origins of Moral Intuition," but maybe the actual title has more mystery to attract the buyer. Patricia Churchland is a philosopher who got interested in, and studied, neurobiology. She was dissatisfied with the reigning phil...
  • Amber
    Aug 31, 2019
    The author's case for a biological genesis of morality and conscience contrasted with religious or philosophical theories. What I loved: I love reading about how the brain works and deep questions of human understanding. I didn't find this book compelling on the whole. She was cond...
  • Sandra Helen
    Sep 13, 2019
    This is not a Book Challenge read, but it should be. It is a non-fiction book by a woman scientist. I haven?t read a lot of those. ?Conscience? is about the brain and how the mammalian brains developed such that we are social animals vs those who live a solitary life. Churchland ...
  • Majolo
    Aug 19, 2019
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  • David
    Jul 28, 2019
    Probably the best book I've read on morality so far. The book is well-written and easy to understand. If only all philosophers wrote this way. She actually helped me to see the flaws with moral skepticism as it's generally only focused on an academic or religious narrow version of mora...
  • Bob
    Apr 27, 2019
    Summary: Exploring the neuroscience of our sense of right and wrong, integrating our knowledge of neurophysical causation, social factors, and philosophy, arguing that moral norms are based in our brain functions, interacting with our social world. Conscience. Unless one is signific...
  • Dan Graser
    Jul 18, 2019
    UC Professor of Philosophy Patricia Churchland is at all times a masterful writer with important issues to discuss and the necessary linguistic and intellectual tools with which to discuss them. This latest work centers on the formation of what we know of as our conscience and how vary...
  • Wayne
    Jul 02, 2019
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  • Chunyang Ding
    Jun 29, 2019
    Not a bad book, but also not a good one. The first half of the book seems misleading, as the premise is a neurological understanding of moral philosophy, yet the neurology present is fundamental evolutionary neurochemistry. It feels more like a neuroscience textbook, highlighting key e...
  • Cathy Hodge
    Sep 11, 2019
    I liked how we got information about biological brain function, social norms as motivation, and morality arguments in great detail with pictures. Some parts of the book were dry with scientific research and studies.... but I felt I learned a lot. Patricia Churchland wrote "down-to-eart...
  • Krzysiek
    Aug 26, 2019
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  • John Kaufmann
    Jul 14, 2019
    Like her earlier book Touching a Nerve: Our Brains, Our Selves, I found this a very interesting read and learned a lot. But also like that previous book, I find her writing and arguments very subtle, such that I occasionally lost the thread. Part of it is me, I am sure -- this is diffi...
  • Steven Maloney
    Jul 29, 2019
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  • Ryan Boissonneault
    Jun 24, 2019
    When thinking about morality, people generally make two mistakes: 1) that moral certainty can be achieved by consulting some external, objective source, and 2) that if this is not the case, and moral certainty cannot be attained, then we all have license to do whatever we want and ther...
  • Varga Sámuel
    Jul 27, 2019
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  • David W. W.
    Aug 12, 2019
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  • Samuel M McClure
    Jul 21, 2019
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  • Per Kraulis
    Jul 09, 2019
    Philosopher-neuroscientist Patricia Churchland explores the basis for conscience and morality. She discusses both the evolutionary and mechanistic processes underlying our humanity. A nice read, with several important and sometimes provocative points delivered in a well-written text. C...
  • Matt Hagle
    Aug 30, 2019
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  • Laura Polding
    Jul 26, 2019
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  • Sayon Camara
    Aug 04, 2019
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  • Anastasia
    Aug 09, 2019
    A pretty enjoyable read but it was different from what I expected - I've been swayed by a lot of argumentation from both Paul and Patricia Churchland (definitely favourite power couple material), and so I was excited to see that Patricia had a new book released a few weeks ago. I l...
  • Bo Bao
    Sep 03, 2019
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  • Roo Phillips
    Sep 12, 2019
    An interesting mixture of philosophy and neuroscience. Churchland takes a cautious dive into some of the latest research in neuroscience. She tries to connect the research to our understanding of moral values, where they come from, how they affect us in different situations, etc. While...
  • RYAN ROBERTSON
    Jul 20, 2019
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  • Kaltrim Perzefaj
    Jul 17, 2019
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  • Craig Stewart
    Aug 17, 2019
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  • Francois Tremblay
    Jul 27, 2019
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  • Nancy Garon
    Jun 13, 2019
    Amazing book! I love how she integrated a variety of research areas. ...
  • M Naser
    Aug 27, 2019
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