Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World

Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World

What's the most effective path to success in any domain? It's not what you think. Plenty of experts argue that anyone who wants to develop a skill, play an instrument, or lead their field should start early, focus intensely, and rack up as many hours of deliberate practice as possible. If you dabble or delay, you'll never catch up to the people who got a head start. But a What's the most effective path to success in any domain? It's not what you think. Plenty of experts argue that...

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Title:Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World
Author:David Epstein
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0735214484
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:352 pages pages

Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World Reviews

  • Mike Arvela
    Jul 15, 2019
    Loved this, with its numerous examples of how people have risen to shine in ways conventionally not considered possible. My only worry is that the reason I like it so much is because it validates what I already thought about how learning never is for nothing. In any case, recommend it ...
  • Benjamin
    Jun 27, 2019
    As eye and ear catching as a Malcolm Gladwell book, but better researched and far, far more conscientious than any Gladwell I've ever read. Epstein, who comes to this book from journalism, in particular sports journalism, writes a series of brilliant articles, loosely coupled into a bo...
  • Mehrsa
    May 31, 2019
    This book is a useful mythbuster--grit, 10,000 hours, deliberate practice, tiger moms--this book says forget all of that (*sort of). Try lots of things, read broadly, and fail lots of times. I agree with this formula for success. Specialization is boring. *I think there is somethin...
  • Ryan
    Jul 26, 2019
    After encountering the 10000 hours theory (Gladwell), the grit theory (Duckworth), and the Tiger Mom theory (Chua), it seemed obvious to many that we should specialize as much as possible and as early as possible. Because Tiger Woods was unusually athletic as an infant and his father h...
  • Catriona
    Jun 19, 2019
    Experience is never wasted I found this riveting in all the best ways non-fiction can be: extremely readable, endlessly fascinating, thought provoking, leaves a lasting impression and you see the world a little differently on the other side of it - things once in darkness are illumi...
  • Anmiryam
    Apr 12, 2019
    Everyone--butcher, baker, candlestick maker; teacher, student, scientist, business analyst; parent, job hunter, retiree--will get something motivating and useful from this book. No matter where you are in life, you will see the world a bit differently after you read this energetic and ...
  • Katy
    May 02, 2019
    I received my copy free through Goodreads Giveaways ...
  • Pete
    Jun 15, 2019
    Range : Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World (2019) by David Epstein is an interesting book about the value of not being overly specialised and focused on one thing. The book starts by pointing out how Tiger Woods took up golf at an early age and how this example is picked...
  • Weixiang
    Jul 10, 2019
    Like many books in this category of positive work research, the majority of the times it's applicable in the first world. Now the disclaimer aside, this book is great on the current timeline that we are living in right now, especially for the target audience of this book. We must reach...
  • Thomas
    Jun 04, 2019
    An enjoyable book - plenty of fascinating stories/studies and Epstein demonstrates plenty of range of his own (I enjoyed his earlier Sports Gene, but this book goes far beyond the world of sports, even if it starts there). I think there are two different books packed in here - one prov...
  • Bjoern Rochel
    Jun 21, 2019
    A good read in the style of "Team of Teams" or "Barking up the wrong tree". Debunks the general applicability of the 10000h rule and deliberate practice for knowledge work (e.g. the wicked world) and shows with a lot of case studies that often top performers are the result of a lar...
  • Mart
    Jun 10, 2019
    Specialization. Expected by bosses, parents and university faculties. But does it work? There seems to be good scientific evidence to the contrary. Dabble in everything. Follow your curiosity. Leads to discoveries and is antifragile. Much recommended book by a great science journalist....
  • Katie
    Jul 07, 2019
    ?Compare yourself to yourself yesterday, not to younger people who aren?t you.? An incredibly slow read for me but I enjoyed it a lot and felt like I was on information overload after finishing each chapter. Who knew that so many case studies and anecdotes could support having...
  • Erik Germani
    Jun 21, 2019
    Like a Gladwell book, Range has a bunch of scientific anecdotes that would do well at a cocktail party. Which is perfect, because the warmly parental thesis statement is one that anyone will drink to. To wit: "don't worry if you aren't hyperspecialized, there's value in being a general...
  • Geoff
    Jul 09, 2019
    Pop science / pop psych so take with a grain of salt, but it's a nice corrective to the current idea that early specialization is a must for success. I loved the idea as well that specialization and deep within-domain expertise works best in "kind worlds" where there are consistent rul...
  • Prashant Ghabak
    Jul 05, 2019
    A very counter-intuitive take on career and skills. The core argument of the book is that though humans are moving more and more towards hyper-specialization, a lot of advances and innovations happen at boundaries of fields and from outsiders who are non-specialists. Some really compel...
  • Annie
    Aug 02, 2019
    I give this book 3.5 stars. The point of this book is that specialists do well in a "kind" world, where rules are clear and feedback is immediate (like playing golf or chess). Generalists do well in a "wicked" world, where rules are unclear or unknown and feedback is not immediate (lik...
  • Randall Wallace
    Jul 02, 2019
    I?ve staked my entire adult life on following the generalist?s path instead of the specialist?s, so I hoped this book would answer my basic questions: What about the role Neuroplasticity plays with keeping the following people analytically extra-sharp: The Polymath, the Multi-Ins...
  • Michael Perkins
    May 28, 2019
    The story of the new U.S. Open golf winner illustrates part of the thesis of this book. A range of experience is sometimes better than over-specialization. In the book, Roger Federer is another example. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/17/sp... ======================= This pass...
  • Peter Mcloughlin
    Jun 18, 2019
    Covers the idea of having a wide range of knowledge outside one's specialty helps people succeed. Often new ideas come from thinking analogically about things unrelated to what one is looking at. Has lots of case studies that make the argument that having a wide range of experiences ca...
  • Jennie
    Jun 08, 2019
    3.5 stars. This ended up being very interesting and engaging. It definitely gave me a lot to think about, more than the typical pop psychology book. The author weirdly inserts himself in a few places and it wasn't really seamless in those areas, but he did do a good job of telling enga...
  • Rhys
    Jun 17, 2019
    I enjoyed this book, advocating for more generalism in education, science, and other bastions of silo-ism and reductionism. It is a good antidote to Nichol's The Death of Expertise. "Beneath complexity, hedgehogs tend to see simple, deterministic rules of cause and effect framed by ...
  • Shobhit
    Jul 18, 2019
    This book resonated with me perfectly. In my profession (Software Development), there is an increasing demand for specialization. There are back end engineers, front end engineers, devops, data engineers, data scientists blah blah blah. I never felt comfortable with a label. The entire...
  • Stefan Bruun
    Aug 01, 2019
    Interesting perspectives on the many roads to excellence and a break with the traditional view of hyper-specialization. ...
  • Josh
    Jul 01, 2019
    One of my favorite quotes by Albert Einstein is, ?In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.? Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World by David Epstein is about the latter half of that quote. Range introduces the concept of wick...
  • Lou
    Jun 26, 2019
    Some non-fiction can be boring and even useless, but this is a work of non-fiction that everyone should read; I certainly got a lot out of it and feel many others will too. Offering a wide-ranging wealth of information and research Epstein shares data, as well as his opinion, on how to...
  • The Artisan Geek
    Apr 23, 2019
    23/4/19 A someone who has always considered themselves a generalist through and through, I am really interested to have a read! Riverhead books was so nice to send me over a copy, so a sincere thank you to them! :D You can find me on Youtube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Websit...
  • Amine
    Jul 17, 2019
    A very refreshing book on the limits of hyperspecialization. ...
  • Christian Sodergren
    Jul 06, 2019
    Lots of great stories but unsatisfying when it comes to making a claim for the central thesis. ...
  • Mark
    May 13, 2019
    Disclosure: I won this pre-release copy in a drawing from the publisher. The book wasn't badly written, but for me it was something of a slog. I've enjoyed similar books in this genre more, the sort of pop-psychology-self-help mashup including books like "Willpower" (Baumeister/Tier...