North of Dawn

North of Dawn

A couple's tranquil life abroad is irrevocably transformed by the arrival of their son's widow and children, in the latest from Somalia's most celebrated novelist. For decades, Gacalo and Mugdi have lived in Oslo, where they've led a peaceful, largely assimilated life and raised two children. Their beloved son, Dhaqaneh, however, is driven by feelings of alienation to jihad A couple's tranquil life abroad is irrevocably transformed by the arrival of their son's widow and children, in the l...

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Title:North of Dawn
Author:Nuruddin Farah
Rating:
Genres:Fiction
ISBN:B07BD2QHMT
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:383 pages pages

North of Dawn Reviews

  • Azita Rassi
    May 10, 2019
    The beginning of the book was very promising, but it didn?t deliver. I don?t know whether this book is a translation or is originally written in English, but the prose was very artificial, especially the dialogues. It was like reading a political essay instead of a novel. The chara...
  • matt
    Jan 12, 2019
    I was not a big fan of the writing style. It is clear and direct, but it gives little to no insight into the thoughts and motivations of the characters ? which is what I find valuable in a work of fiction. The story is interesting, but unfocused. ...
  • Chad Walker
    Jan 16, 2019
    I really wanted to like this one, I did. I kept looking for a reason for the artificiality of the dialogue, the lack of characterization, the ploddingness of the execution. Couldn't find one. The premise is great. ...
  • Sue
    Jan 07, 2019
    Somali family settled in Norway, but whose son is lost to Islamic fanaticism. Interesting story. I was surprised at how amateurish the writing was (seemed to me, anyway), given that the author has written numerous other novels & won numerous awards. ...
  • Katie
    May 03, 2019
    A novel about a family of assimilated Somalis living in Norway. The family is successful, has lots of friends, and gets along in the culture great--but their son ends up going back to Somalia and committing an act of terrorism. Then, his widow and step-children end up getting sent to N...
  • Dorothy
    Jan 09, 2019
    Nuruddin Farah is a celebrated Somali novelist who is often mentioned as a contender for the Nobel Prize for Literature. He frequently writes about the effects and costs of terrorism in today's world and when he does, he speaks from personal experience. His sister, who was a nutritioni...
  • Ross
    Dec 29, 2018
    A detailed fascinating read I really enjoyed this book. A detailed looked at Somali immigrants in Oslo Norway is gripping and completely worth your time. ...
  • Ryan Mishap
    Jun 30, 2019
    Told with such a straight-forward style in all ways--especially the dialogue--I kept waiting for this to take a dramatic (or at least melo-) turn. While most of the exciting action takes place either before the narration begins or off-camera (if you will), the exploration of the im...
  • Elizabeth
    Jan 24, 2019
    I should have read the Wash Post review more carefully before reading this book. https://www.washingtonpost.com/entert... "?North of Dawn? suffers from a ramshackle quality one might expect from an exciting but not quite finished draft. There are strange gaps in the plot, an...
  • Ron Charles
    Dec 19, 2018
    When Nuruddin Farah writes fiction about the ravages of terrorism, the details may be imaginary but the scars are real. The celebrated Somali novelist, a frequent contender for the Nobel Prize in literature, lost his sister Basra Farah Hassan in 2014. A nutritionist working for UNICEF,...
  • Peter
    Dec 25, 2018
    Why is the dialogue in Farah's novels so stiltedly formal? Is it based on Somali (and also, in this case, Norwegian) speech patterns? Is it a kind of alienation effect, reminding us that these are authorial creations, a set of points of view put into conversation with each other? But t...
  • Carole
    Jan 26, 2019
    North of Dawn was a fascinating read about a Somali husband and wife living in Norway whose son killed himself and many others in a suicide terrorist bombing in Somalia. Although they have conflicting emotions over their son's death, they bring their son's widow and her two children to...
  • Booknblues
    Nov 20, 2018
    What happens to the citizens of a country when the country collapses and is considered a failed state? There are only so many answers, but they all center around survival and belief. Nuruddin Farah, an established Somali writer who resides in South Africa answers this in his latest boo...
  • Nat
    Dec 23, 2018
    1.5 stars A mildly interesting novel about Somalian asylum seekers' settlement into Norwegian society. It was bogged down with so much mundane detail and Mugdi seemed to have such an immense loathing for his daughter-in-law and her children up until Naciim and Saafi conformed to his...
  • Jennifer
    Jan 05, 2019
    I officially started reading this book this week. I couldn?t put it down, I was so enthralled. ...
  • Paltia
    Feb 02, 2019
    This novel is overly ambitious. If Mr. Farah had limited himself to the core ideas it would have been less jumbled up at the end. The story begins with parents living in Norway learning their son, who has moved to Somalia, has killed himself in a suicide bombing. The mother has promise...
  • Doreen
    Feb 28, 2019
    The author of this book is a celebrated Somali novelist who apparently has been a frequent contender for the Nobel Prize in Literature. I was unfamiliar with him until I came across a brief plot outline of this book in The New Yorker and the premise sounded interesting. Mugdi, a for...
  • Jan
    Mar 06, 2019
    Nurrudin Farah has been mentioned as a potential Nobel Prize winner, so I was surprised at how readable and entertaining this book was. Farah explores issues of immigration, fundamentalism and acculturation through the story of a sophisticated Somali couple, 20-year citizens of Norway,...
  • Denise
    Dec 26, 2018
    To begin with, I have a problem with using "right-wing" as a synonym for "bigot". It's especially jarring in a book meant to show that "Muslim" and "terrorist" are not the same. Farah is correct to state that most of the problems arise from small groups of extremists opposing each othe...
  • Sanura
    Oct 23, 2018
    This is the story of an older Somali-Norwegian couple who take in their deceased son's wife and stepchildren, and this story follows these characters as they acclimate to Norway and their new family. This book was tough to rate because on one hand, I enjoyed the story but on the other ...
  • Heather
    May 01, 2019
    In a story reminiscent of today?s headlines, Nuruddin Farah tackles the complex intersection of new beginnings arising from a legacy of violence, nationalism, radical religious fervor, and family loyalty. North of Dawn leaves the reader battling with essential questions such as: 1) H...
  • Stephanie
    Feb 23, 2019
    A very interesting premise, but the flat, stilted dialog and writing ruined this book for me. I can't tell if it's just a really bad translation, which could be the case, as there are constant weird, outmoded English slang and terms (for example, when have you ever heard an English spe...
  • Bruce Alford
    Jul 02, 2019
    This book was featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, Kirkus Reviews as well as in NPR Books. How does a novel with so many obvious errors garner prime review real-estate? Its publication seems to have more to do with a fad and with the more serious fact that migration is a cu...
  • Cherise Wolas
    Jan 26, 2019
    This is the first novel I've read by Nuruddin Farah, a frequent contender for the Nobel Prize in Literature. A writer from Somalia who now lives in Cape Town, South Africa, his own sister was killed in 2014 when she was murdered along with at least 20 others when the Taliban bombed a r...
  • Christine
    Dec 24, 2018
    As another reviewer put it, this book was a "mildly interesting novel". That pretty much sums it up for me. I don't regret reading the book (spending the time) but I'm not sure I'd recommend it to others. It felt, at times, like I was reading snippets from this or that character's life...
  • L
    Feb 19, 2019
    Man...i honestly dont know what to rate or think of this book. I am just...i dont know! I mean i liked the plot and i liked the political messages but some of the characters were weird and i couldnt quite get to know or understand some of them. Naciim in the beginning acted ignorant an...
  • Bob  Brinkmeyer
    Jan 05, 2019
    Really more like 3.5 stars (hey, I'm a professor and I like plus and minus grades, though the university where I now teach only allows plus grades, no minuses). Anyway, this is a timely and in many ways a deeply insightful novel about the experiences of Somalian refugees living in Norw...
  • Jessie
    Mar 11, 2019
    This lovely book was my first written by a Somalian and also my first situated in Norway, and so I spent a fair bit of the book trying to place the abruptness of the language, which was also unfamiliar to me. About a Norwegian-Somali family that is forever changed by the addition of th...
  • Christopher Berry
    Mar 04, 2019
    I loved this one! The story was very well told, the writing is superb! I was engaged with the characters throughout! I did however, feel that the ending was a bit rushed, and it would have fit better in the middle of the story, rather than the ending. The ending ramped up another side ...
  • Anne-Marie Slaughter
    Feb 16, 2019
    A glimpse into other cultures This novel is written in an oddly flat style that is off-putting at first but became increasingly compelling. In the end, basic human emotions and conditions cut across cultures. ...