In Search of the Canary Tree: The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress, and a Changing World

In Search of the Canary Tree: The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress, and a Changing World

The award-winning and surprisingly hopeful story of one woman's search for resiliency in a warming world Several years ago, ecologist Lauren E. Oakes set out from California for Alaska's old-growth forests to hunt for a dying tree: the yellow-cedar. With climate change as the culprit, the death of this species meant loss for many Alaskans. Oakes and her research team wanted The award-winning and surprisingly hopeful story of one woman's search for resiliency in a warming world Several y...

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Title:In Search of the Canary Tree: The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress, and a Changing World
Author:Lauren E. Oakes
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:154169712X
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:288 pages pages

In Search of the Canary Tree: The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress, and a Changing World Reviews

  • Marion
    Jan 30, 2019
    I have so much appreciation for this book, in which Dr. Oakes explores how to be both a scientist and a climate activist. I appreciated learning the science behind how climate change has caused the dieback of the yellow-cedar tree in Alaska. The more I read, the more I felt like I was ...
  • Nadine
    Apr 02, 2019
    I read this book as part of my 2019 Reading Women Challenge, for the categories of A Book Featuring a Woman in Science and A Book About Nature. I really, really loved this book. I generally shy away from books about climate change because I find it so scary and overwhelming, but thi...
  • Heidi
    Apr 06, 2019
    Reminiscent of Lab Girl, this is the story of the final work for a Ph.D. in ecology and how she searched for a specific tree in specific conditions. She talked to the people who value it, and those who don't, and she reflects on climate change and hope in a world of extinctions and cli...
  • Mary
    Jan 24, 2019
    Ever heard why they used to keep canary in a cold mine? Cause when the tiny canary died, you knew there was lethal gas in the mine that would kill the miners if they didn?t flee. Oakes uses this reference in her title. Oakes?s book is about more than just the decline and die of...
  • MicheleinNJ
    Apr 03, 2019
    An amazing book that I am still processing, and probably will be for quite awhile. I enjoy reading narrative books about science, exploration, the natural world that are both fiction (for example, anything by Andrea Barrett or Barbara Kingsolver) or non-fiction (The Feather Thief by Ki...
  • Patricia
    Jul 07, 2019
    Oakes manages both to provide a dismaying account of climate change well under way and to fill her readers with optimism about what we can and should still do. Her interviews with people who deeply love the trees were often memorable and moving. ...
  • Laurie
    Aug 02, 2019
    This book is about a woman writing her thesis on the yellow cypress tree. It is the canary tree because it is the "warning" for global warming with regard to other trees and life. Similar to the canary that warned miners to a problem with the air in the mine. The book is the more perso...
  • Betsy
    Feb 18, 2019
    2.5 stars. I really wanted to enjoy this book, but it felt bland and forced. There were a few bright moments, but overall I couldn?t wait to finish it. ...
  • Erin
    Jul 06, 2019
    Climate change? ? Good book on how the scientific process works, especially when it comes to measuring the forest, growth and decline and what it takes to monitor. Also great insights about people and the environments in which they live. Climate change? ?? Good book...
  • Alix
    Jul 04, 2019
    3.5 stars. I wish this had been better written, because the content is so important and the scientific expedition she went on was full of drama and excitement. The first few chapters in particular are marred by her apparent belief that it's good to jump back and forth in time for no re...
  • Doug
    Jul 22, 2019
    I'd give this 3.5 stars if I could...got a little slow for me in the middle, when discussing the interviews, but I thought the initial third and final third of the book were moving and well written. The final 2-3 chapters in particular were lovely and stirring. A book that leaves you a...
  • Leigh
    Jan 24, 2019
    A different kind of science book which also feels like a memoir. Excellent audio book. The story itself, and the energy with which the narrator reads it, drew me right in and kept my attention all the way. Lauren's physical and emotional journey takes her through the dieback of yellow ...
  • Ben
    Feb 13, 2019
    While this most definitely a book about climate change, it is not a book that focuses on changing climate itself. It's about the consequences of a changing climate, both for the trees and ecosystem being studied and personally for the author, X. Intermingled between a compelling (but...
  • Sierra
    Mar 29, 2019
    This was an interesting book about a Scientist who has a little bit different view on the changing of the climate. Lauren Oakes spent years studying one tree species and this is her adventure and the conclusion she came to along the way! At one point, Lauren ended up in Alaska to hu...
  • Koen
    Jan 08, 2019
    Am i starting the year off with a five-star book? Having just finished the second half of the book in one sitting and still processing i think i am. I think this 250 page book is a true gem. Considering it's length there is really a lot too this book and Oakes' thoughtful narrative...
  • Dana
    Apr 14, 2019
    I chose to read this book for a somewhat unusual reason. Lauren Oakes' book was named a Science Friday "Top Science Book of 2018" at the same time as my book. She was published by the same publisher (Basic Books) and edited by the same editor (TJ Kelleher). So I got this book out of a ...
  • Eryne
    Feb 15, 2019
    The science of climate change is well understood. This book also considers the psychological effects. It's a refreshing look at a serious topic. It lacks the usual depressing statistics in favour of learning how people are learning to accept and adapt their personal lives to deal with ...
  • Kirsten Cutler
    Dec 31, 2018
    An informative and fascinating narrative about the die-off of Yellow Cedar trees in Southern Alaska that acknowledges previous studies which established the cause to be climate change but then significantly explores the impact of the loss of this tree species, postulates what kind of c...
  • Olive (abookolive)
    Nov 25, 2018
    Check out my review on Open Letters Review: https://openlettersreview.com/open-le... ...
  • Mary
    Mar 03, 2019
    This book felt less about the state of the Yellow Cypress than it did about how to do science on global warming indicators and stay hopeful. It?s also a story about how science on such complex subjects is conducted (little money and lots of sweat equity and minimal sampling). ...
  • Elentarri
    Jul 29, 2018
    NOTE: I received an Advanced Readers Copy of this book from NetGalley. This review is my honest opinion of the book. In Search of the Canary Tree is not so much a popular science book about a specific topic, but rather the author?s personal experiences while doing research for her...
  • Waverly Fitzgerald
    Feb 24, 2019
    I didn't expect to be completely swept away in an account of one scientist's attempts to learn more about mortality in the yellow cedar population in Alaska but I was. I felt like I was reading a novel as Lauren Oakes writes about how she finds a subject for her PhD study, lines up spo...
  • Margarita
    Feb 04, 2019
    A beautiful look into the life a scientist studying the effects of climate change on a species of tree. What makes it interesting is that Dr. Oakes chooses to lay aside an otherwise dispassionate, scientific look at what is happening, and instead decides to ask deeper, more philosophic...
  • David Wineberg
    Aug 30, 2018
    In Search of the Canary Tree refers to the phrase ?canary in the coal mine? ? the harbinger of disaster. It is the story of a Stanford graduate student who found herself totally immersed in the fast-disappearing yellow-cedar of Alaska?s southeast coast. She was fishing for a do...
  • Chris Landry
    Jun 23, 2019
    A fair amount of my work relates to climate change, so I wasn?t sure I wanted to read more on the topic. But I picked it up after a work trip to Alaska, and I?m so glad I did. It?s both a beautiful description of a scientist?s life (from the still-too-rare perspective of a woma...
  • Savvy
    Aug 11, 2019
    This book strikes a nice balance between personal interest and science. There are thought-provoking moments and I appreciate that the author lets us inside her head as she thinks about climate change. She has done a nice job of sharing others? thoughts on climate change and my though...
  • Ashley Phillips
    Mar 12, 2019
    I enjoyed this book. I appreciated that she explored how her findings effected her and the people invested in the forests. The struggle between the impassive science and living with the knowledge of the full ramifications of human induced climate change. It is an important read and it...
  • Maureen Caupp
    Jul 14, 2019
    A very interesting read that is both saddening yet hopeful. The author gives the reader both a glimpse into her scientific planning and research of yellow cedar decline due to climate change and her personal emotions and journey learning what she did. About loss and change but also the...
  • Marcia Scott
    May 06, 2019
    Follow the story of the author?s research (for her PhD) into the decline and death of Alaskan Yellow Cedars. Far from a dull recital of statistics, experience the field work, meet her crew, and meet the natives she interviewed. Be prepared to feel the sadness for the loss of this spe...
  • Lou Sills
    Feb 01, 2019
    Somewhat humble, clear illustration of the trials & tribulations, however the writing is a bit too insipid. ...