Mortal Republic: How Rome Fell into Tyranny

Mortal Republic: How Rome Fell into Tyranny

A new history of the Roman Republic and its collapse In Mortal Republic, prizewinning historian Edward J. Watts offers a new history of the fall of the Roman Republic that explains why Rome exchanged freedom for autocracy. For centuries, even as Rome grew into the Mediterranean's premier military and political power, its governing institutions, parliamentary rules, and pol A new history of the Roman Republic and its collapse In Mortal Republic, prizewinning historian Edward J. Watts o...

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Title:Mortal Republic: How Rome Fell into Tyranny
Author:Edward J. Watts
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:0465093817
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:352 pages pages

Mortal Republic: How Rome Fell into Tyranny Reviews

  • Antonio
    Jan 30, 2019
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  • Ruben Vermeeren
    Jan 28, 2019
    The book covers around 300 years of history not the Roman Republic, from the establishment of its dominance in the Mediterranean until the end of the Republic and the start of the empire by Augustus. It is extremely dense in information but reads well and for me filled some important g...
  • Shoshana
    Nov 06, 2018
    What a fascinating and timely book this is. This is the history of how the Roman Republic transmuted into an autocracy; going from an austere, honor-driven, consensus based society to an unimaginably wealthy oligarchy which rested on the shoulders of one man. Well-written and beautiful...
  • Tim
    Feb 07, 2019
    A Lively and Timely Reading. ...
  • Noah
    Feb 07, 2019
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  • Mark
    Oct 26, 2018
    This is a interesting book ? one with a very relevant message. ...
  • Gabi Dobre
    Jan 21, 2019
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  • Peter Mcloughlin
    Nov 28, 2018
    The founders of the US had the Roman Republic present in their minds as they were constructing the US republic. Many of the institutions created outside of the English common law were modeled on political ideals inspired by earlier republics. Rome being the most important example of th...
  • Vance J.
    Dec 27, 2018
    ?...the Republic did not need to die. A Republic is not an organism. It has no natural lifespan. It lives or dies solely on the basis of the choices made by those in charge of its custody.? P.280). I?ll call this Watt?s thesis statement. I think he makes a good case that when p...
  • Mary
    Jan 19, 2019
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  • Rob
    Jan 26, 2019
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  • Elentarri
    Jul 11, 2018
    I usually battle to enjoy history books that deal with the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire - they are just too confusing and boring. THIS book is different. I actually enjoyed reading it. The writing is clear and accessible, the subject straightforward, and the relevance of that su...
  • Rao Kasibhotla
    Feb 07, 2019
    I started reading this because I was looking for parallels between the fabled Roman republic and the modern American version. We hear so much that they are so similar and I learned that, besides some superficial similarities, they are nothing alike. The author's point is that any re...
  • Terry Tucker
    Feb 10, 2019
    In the introduction, the author states that his aim is to help us understand the challenging and occasionally alarming political realities of our world. Later in the first chapter, (kindle location 137) the author states that this book explains why Rome would trade the liberty of polit...
  • Karl
    Dec 31, 2018
    I have this scene playing in my head of some book publisher checking his Twitter in 2018 and declaring ?Books about the fall of republics are hot right now! Get me a Roman historian.? This book promises an analysis and description of the violent end of the Roman Republic, an always...
  • Lauren
    Jan 30, 2019
    Dense, and it takes about 80 pages to stop careening amongst so very many facts and details before it straightens itself out into a more linear narrative, but ultimately - worth it. On the surface it's an oft repetative recount of ambitious men similarly violating good faith in governm...
  • Danilo DiPietro
    Feb 13, 2019
    Well written, well researched cautionary tale about the fall of the Roman Republic. Many lessons that resonate in today?s political climate. ...
  • Tobias Räderscheidt
    Dec 30, 2018
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  • Sumit RK
    Oct 06, 2018
    "No Republic is eternal. It lives only as long as its citizens want it.? In Mortal Republic, historian Edward J. Watts offers a new history of the fall of the Roman Republic that explains the collapse of democracy in the Republic and the rise of an autocratic Roman Empire. A...
  • Matt McCormick
    Jan 13, 2019
    The book is a fine overview of 300-years of Roman history to the end of the Augustinian age. Watts writes well and this chronological description of the Empire was interesting and easily digested. What it lacked, and what I was looking for, was a compelling analysis of the "why". Wh...
  • Ryan Lininger
    Jan 31, 2019
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  • coolguy2k
    Jan 27, 2019
    Thorough, but dull. I wish the last chapter is what the book was. Heard about this one from Nytimes book review podcast and sounded interesting, but was pretty plain until that last chapter. ...
  • Arybo ✨
    Nov 03, 2018
    The past is no Oracle and historians are not prophets, but this does not mean that it is wrong to look to antiquity for help understanding the present. This was intense. No republic is eternal. It lives only as long as its citizens want it. As soon as I finished the book I ...
  • Anne Morgan
    Oct 21, 2018
    A study of several hundred years of ancient Rome, ?Mortal Republic? tries to analyze why it became vulnerable to dictators and eventually fell. I found the writing style largely dry and often too repetitive, reading like a basic history textbook than anything else. As fascinating a...
  • Steve Peterson
    Jan 13, 2019
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  • Paul
    Jan 23, 2019
    Educational ...
  • Robert D
    Jan 29, 2019
    Fascinating reading, difficult to follow at times, but a great education. ...
  • Jarno Lappalainen
    Jan 09, 2019
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  • Maximillian
    Jan 18, 2019
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  • Marks54
    Dec 10, 2018
    There is an often repeated saying attributed to Mark Twain but probably apocryphal that ?history doesn?t repeat itself but it does rhyme? - or something like that. The author is a senior history professor at Cal-San Diego who has written an account of the death of the Roman Repub...