The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity

The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity

Who do you think you are? That?s a question bound up in another: What do you think you are? Gender. Religion. Race. Nationality. Class. Culture. Such affiliations give contours to our sense of self, and shape our polarized world. Yet the collective identities they spawn are riddled with contradictions, and cratered with falsehoods. Kwame Anthony Appiah?s "The Lies That Bind Who do you think you are? That?s a question bound up in another: What do you think you are? Gender. Religion. R...

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Title:The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity
Author:Kwame Anthony Appiah
Rating:
Genres:Philosophy
ISBN:B076MMN58K
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:256 pages pages

The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity Reviews

  • Mythili
    Aug 28, 2018
    Reads like a series of undergrad lectures. I generally agree with him and enjoyed the board range of references he drew from but didn?t feel challenged or pushed or particularly surprised by anything in this book (and sometimes felt he oversold his argument). I would be very interest...
  • Katrina
    Oct 24, 2018
    A wonderful, easy-to-read introduction to deconstructing "identity" and critiquing the concept of cultural appropriation. I plan to use this in and undergraduate course addressing those issues. ...
  • Chris
    Sep 25, 2018
    When I read Cosmopolitanism, it was exactly what I needed; finally somebody was making sense, finally someone with global morals. Here, Appiah comes very close to Cosmopolitanism (which I consider his best statement, and which I?ve loaned to friends and raved about). However, The Lie...
  • Salvatore
    Sep 18, 2018
    A good primer on the subject. Identities are necessary to growth, to self-awareness, to challenge. And yet identities/groups/sub-groups don't explain the nuances. It's a delicate balance, a continuous push and pull of which we really need to be consistently aware. Appiah has some good ...
  • Mehrsa
    Oct 25, 2018
    This book is more of a contemplation of identity--it's not really a "rethinking" so much because there's really nothing new here. Just thoughts about religious and racial identity and how those things shift and are culturally bound and can be shed. I like everything he said and I like ...
  • Kelly McCloskey-Romero
    Dec 26, 2018
    Important and thought-provoking. Appiah breaks identity down into multiple parts - creed, country, faith, color, and class, and his vision is as clear and straightforward as his prose. In a word, identity is complex - as the factors that form it are sometimes overstated and sometimes u...
  • Margaret
    Nov 03, 2018
    Appiah is an engrossing read. Lots of stories from his life and reading illustrate his point that our identities are more fluid than is sometimes thought. Nationality, gender, race, religion, all have fuzzy edges, and our most important identity was expressed by an African-Roman writer...
  • Sam
    Oct 05, 2018
    One of the better philosophy books I've read in awhile. It's well written and easy to comprehend (which says something for the philosophy genre) and the ideas are interesting and thought provoking. I wish I had more than three weeks to think about the ideas and research some of the ref...
  • Sara
    Aug 13, 2018
    The author is a Ghanian/ British philosopher who has spent most of his career in the US. He gets a little academic at times, but does a brilliant job of dissecting and debunking ideas of identity around "creed, country, color, class and culture," showing how too much of our thinking ab...
  • Steve
    Oct 03, 2018
    Liked this book so much! Reminded me of his Cosmopolitanism book. Very good discussions of things like race, nationality, sex but I most of all liked his treatment of religions and cultures. ...
  • Sarah
    Jan 07, 2019
    I picked this up because the review I saw said it helped explain identity politics (a phrase that seems to baffle me). The ideas in the book originated as a verbal essay series on BBC4, but it was clear that the author put in the effort to expand and actually consider his ideas for a l...
  • Jo
    Oct 05, 2018
    I enjoyed this book. It was broad ranging and 'introductory' in nature - if you have specialised experience of some of the particular areas then it wouldn't take you into new territory - but the whole thing was joyfully disruptive, and I found some areas of Appiah's discussion rather h...
  • Kaitlyn
    Nov 19, 2018
    This is a book about emptiness. I was fortunate to see Prof Appiah give a talk at the Seattle Public Library, where I purchased this book. I loved the talk and loved the book. He shares many of the things I think and contemplate, and when he doesn?t go as deep as I would like, it...
  • Duncan
    Oct 31, 2018
    An excellent analysis of what it is that shapes our notions of identity and how these can be both false narratives and restrictive. It was interesting to compare the authors multiple overlapping identities with my own case to see that it is indeed a generally applicable thesis. Reco...
  • Jackie Law
    Oct 21, 2018
    Divided into five main sections ? creed, country, colour, class and culture ? The Lies That Bind is a philosophical exploration of what is meant by identity in our contemporary world. To better understand how fluid any definition will inevitably be it is necessary to delve into his...
  • Dawn Rupert
    Dec 24, 2018
    While this was a really good book explaining how it is difficult to discuss identity using classification, creed, country, color class, or culture as a person usually isn't just one thing of any of these identities, I did struggle a little with this book because I have trouble understa...
  • Robin Friedman
    Sep 12, 2018
    A Nightmare A Body's Got To Live With In The Daytime Robert Coover's, recent novel "Huck out West" carries the story of Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn and related characters through the Civil War to 1876. The story is told in Huck's voice with many observations, some cutting but some...
  • Victor Negut
    Oct 21, 2018
    Nothing groundbreaking but the usual excellence that I have come to expected from Kwame Anthony Appiah. For anyone who is not familiar with his work I highly recommend reading his books or articles. He is one of the rare voices of reason on many topic which others seem to lack sense on...
  • Sanjida
    Nov 17, 2018
    Clear, insightful writing on religion, class, ethnicity and culture, eschewing and debunking essentialist framings. Appiah is a kindred spirit to my own views and this book is a delight. ...
  • Ross
    Nov 18, 2018
    Appiah is a philosopher who has thought and written widely on issues of social identity. In The Lies that Bind, he attempts to distill this all down for the lay reader. The result often comes across as a cataloging of the myths behind those identities (gender, race, nation, class, etc)...
  • Martin Dubeci
    Jan 06, 2019
    Pekná kniha, len asi ma to minulo spracovaním, ?i fokusom. Appiah rozoberá, doslova dekon?truuje mýty, ktoré sú spájané s rôznymi formami identít. Ve?a príkladov a anekdot. Vhodné ako rukovä? do ka?dej kr?movej debaty o terore politickej korektnosti. ...
  • Robert Stevenson
    Oct 21, 2018
    The book starts off with a decent beginning about how identity as a word evolved out of Erik Erikson sociological research in the 1960?s and then it adds nothing. After the intro, the book quickly descends into a confusing epistemological labyrinth of religious interpretation, broad ...
  • Hank
    Nov 18, 2018
    Initially, I didn't think I was going to like this book as much as I did. It's smart and reasonable and generslly well written but it also meanders a little more than I'd like. But after finishing, I think that's somewhat on purpose: it's a meditation on just how complicated "ident...
  • Joshua Born
    Oct 23, 2018
    I had high expectations for Kwame Anthony Appiah's The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity. Its title ? describing as it does identities based on membership in a group as "lies" ? foreshadowed that my reading of it would be an extended session of proverbial preaching to the choir. ...
  • Sylvia Vetta
    Nov 28, 2018
    More on identity! Thank you Kwame Anthony Appiah Do you know how it feels to read thoughts that echo your own? I?ve just read Kwame Anthony Appiah?s The Lies that Bind. My second novel Sculpting the Elephant explores identity and crossing cultures. In Oxford we have the world?s ...
  • Sid Groeneman
    Dec 17, 2018
    Like any writing that's seriously analytical, this book requires some effort to get the most from it. But readers interested in the topic of "identity" who put in the work will be rewarded. The author, a professor or philosophy at New York University, devotes a chapter to each of the f...
  • Damon Taylor
    Nov 11, 2018
    ?The fact that identifies come without essences does not mean they come without entanglements? It would be unwise to describe the above quotation from a book which actively warns against essentialism as its ?essence?. Accordingly, I will say only that this is perhaps the missi...
  • Daniel Zaltsman
    Dec 28, 2018
    Look no further for a book to expand your worldview. This one was a pleasure to read and helped me to learn more about the elements that make up identity including religion, class, culture, ethnicity, race, gender and sexuality. It comes from a philosopher's perspective, rooted in hist...
  • Alice Abernathy
    Nov 02, 2018
    Not an easy read. Basic thesis is a sound one: all humans share an identity: humanity. He argues that the usual classifications are inaccurate because there is such wide variation among each classification, e.g.,, one religion purports to share a common belief, but the wide variety of ...
  • Elliott Cheung
    Jan 12, 2019
    Written in relatively simple and understandable vocabulary. This was my first book by Appiah and I appreciated seeing his pattern of thought via the connections he drew. Having grown up with a religious background I found the points he made in the Religion chapter about both homosexual...