The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity

The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity

Who do you think you are? That?s a question bound up in another: What do you think you are? Gender. Religion. Race. Nationality. Class. Culture. Such affiliations give contours to our sense of self, and shape our polarized world. Yet the collective identities they spawn are riddled with contradictions, and cratered with falsehoods. Kwame Anthony Appiah?s "The Lies That Bind Who do you think you are? That?s a question bound up in another: What do you think you are? Gender. Religion. R...

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Title:The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity
Author:Kwame Anthony Appiah
Rating:
Genres:Philosophy
ISBN:B076MMN58K
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:256 pages pages

The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity Reviews

  • Mythili
    Aug 28, 2018
    Reads like a series of undergrad lectures. I generally agree with him and enjoyed the board range of references he drew from but didn?t feel challenged or pushed or particularly surprised by anything in this book (and sometimes felt he oversold his argument). I would be very interest...
  • Jon Stout
    Mar 06, 2019
    Kwame Anthony Appiah sets out to examine the various parts of our culture which make up group identities, the way we categorize ourselves or characterize others. He identifies five kinds of group identity: creed (religion), country, color, class and culture. My first impression is that...
  • K
    Jan 28, 2019
    Timely interrogation of the ethics and history of the ideas around gender (in the Introduction), creed, color, class, and culture in an accessible style. I have long admired Appiah and I'm likely to read his companion piece, Ethics of Identity. ...
  • Katrina
    Oct 24, 2018
    A wonderful, easy-to-read introduction to deconstructing "identity" and critiquing the concept of cultural appropriation. I plan to use this in and undergraduate course addressing those issues. ...
  • Chris
    Sep 25, 2018
    When I read Cosmopolitanism, it was exactly what I needed; finally somebody was making sense, finally someone with global morals. Here, Appiah comes very close to Cosmopolitanism (which I consider his best statement, and which I?ve loaned to friends and raved about). However, The Lie...
  • Mehrsa
    Oct 25, 2018
    This book is more of a contemplation of identity--it's not really a "rethinking" so much because there's really nothing new here. Just thoughts about religious and racial identity and how those things shift and are culturally bound and can be shed. I like everything he said and I like ...
  • Jere
    Feb 08, 2019
    "This isn?t to say that accusations of cultural appropriation never arise from a real offense. Usually, where there?s a problem worth noticing, it involves forms of disrespect compounded by power inequities; cultural appropriation is simply the wrong diagnosis. When Paul Simon make...
  • Margaret
    Nov 03, 2018
    Appiah is an engrossing read. Lots of stories from his life and reading illustrate his point that our identities are more fluid than is sometimes thought. Nationality, gender, race, religion, all have fuzzy edges, and our most important identity was expressed by an African-Roman writer...
  • Susan
    Feb 19, 2019
    I read this book for a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion book club at work. First off, Mr. Appiah is very intelligent. Reading mostly fiction, I had to slow down my reading speed and sometimes re-read sections to completely understand what he was saying. Second, I wish I had his educati...
  • Sara
    Aug 13, 2018
    The author is a Ghanian/ British philosopher who has spent most of his career in the US. He gets a little academic at times, but does a brilliant job of dissecting and debunking ideas of identity around "creed, country, color, class and culture," showing how too much of our thinking ab...
  • sara
    Mar 16, 2019
    It is dead week at college and I am officially dead and tired. I am going to be reading a lot of hopefully fun and not as philosophical as the books I've recently been reading. But to say that, I really did enjoy this book and it made me think a lot about identity and how that impa...
  • Craig Werner
    Jan 26, 2019
    Kwame Anthony Appiah, whose "identity" (those are scare quotes) as a "black (or at least not white)", "gay," academic who speaks what he calls "the Queen's English," infuses every aspect of this smart, useful book on the way we use labels to define ourselves and those we come in contac...
  • Steve
    Oct 03, 2018
    Liked this book so much! Reminded me of his Cosmopolitanism book. Very good discussions of things like race, nationality, sex but I most of all liked his treatment of religions and cultures. ...
  • Sarah
    Jan 07, 2019
    I picked this up because the review I saw said it helped explain identity politics (a phrase that seems to baffle me). The ideas in the book originated as a verbal essay series on BBC4, but it was clear that the author put in the effort to expand and actually consider his ideas for a l...
  • David
    Jan 30, 2019
    Brilliant book! Picked it up at the AAC&U conference last week, where the author spoke at the opening night forum. Been reading him for years in the New York Review of Books, so I was very excited to get to see him in person, and he was wonderful. Such a pleasure to listen to him, ...
  • Sivananthi T
    Feb 09, 2019
    Appiah's treatise on identities takes apart the idea that any identity is one rooted in permanence. Well worth following through his argumentation and though true, does not help us unpack why the power of identities continues to persist to be powerful. ...
  • Darnell
    Feb 26, 2019
    Mixed feelings on this. I felt like it meandered around the periphery of well-established conversations, only selectively engaging with previous work. At times this led to some novel thoughts, but other times I felt like the statements were grandly proclaiming conclusions and ignoring ...
  • Jo
    Oct 05, 2018
    I enjoyed this book. It was broad ranging and 'introductory' in nature - if you have specialised experience of some of the particular areas then it wouldn't take you into new territory - but the whole thing was joyfully disruptive, and I found some areas of Appiah's discussion rather h...
  • Jackie Law
    Oct 21, 2018
    Divided into five main sections ? creed, country, colour, class and culture ? The Lies That Bind is a philosophical exploration of what is meant by identity in our contemporary world. To better understand how fluid any definition will inevitably be it is necessary to delve into his...
  • Joanna
    Mar 10, 2019
    4.5 what an interesting book. Appiah takes all these sticky messy problems of identity and approaches them from a naive-ish position, working out the situations through logic. He intersperses this with accounts of how identity has played out in his own family. It shouldn?t work ? i...
  • Jennifer
    Jan 17, 2019
    Meh. This book adds nothing to the conversation. It feels like it's decades old. I can distill it into one sentence. We are all human! Now you don't have to read it. ...
  • Robin Friedman
    Sep 12, 2018
    A Nightmare A Body's Got To Live With In The Daytime Robert Coover's, recent novel "Huck out West" carries the story of Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn and related characters through the Civil War to 1876. The story is told in Huck's voice with many observations, some cutting but some...
  • Sanjida
    Nov 17, 2018
    Clear, insightful writing on religion, class, ethnicity and culture, eschewing and debunking essentialist framings. Appiah is a kindred spirit to my own views and this book is a delight. ...
  • Robert Stevenson
    Oct 21, 2018
    The book starts off with a decent beginning about how identity as a word evolved out of Erik Erikson sociological research in the 1960?s and then it adds nothing. After the intro, the book quickly descends into a confusing epistemological labyrinth of religious interpretation, broad ...
  • Joshua Born
    Oct 23, 2018
    I had high expectations for Kwame Anthony Appiah's The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity. Its title ? describing as it does identities based on membership in a group as "lies" ? foreshadowed that my reading of it would be an extended session of proverbial preaching to the choir. ...
  • Sylvia Vetta
    Nov 28, 2018
    More on identity! Thank you Kwame Anthony Appiah Do you know how it feels to read thoughts that echo your own? I?ve just read Kwame Anthony Appiah?s The Lies that Bind. My second novel Sculpting the Elephant explores identity and crossing cultures. In Oxford we have the world?s ...
  • Jeffrey Green
    Jan 16, 2019
    Who do you think you are? This book helps answer that important question. Appiah is a fluid, learned, and entertaining writer. This book was originally delivered as a series of lectures, and the accessible style is to be thanked for that. Appiah's book is an argument against essenti...
  • Sid Groeneman
    Dec 17, 2018
    Like any writing that's seriously analytical, this book requires some effort to get the most from it. But readers interested in the topic of "identity" who put in the work will be rewarded. The author, a professor or philosophy at New York University, devotes a chapter to each of the f...
  • Damon Taylor
    Nov 11, 2018
    ?The fact that identifies come without essences does not mean they come without entanglements? It would be unwise to describe the above quotation from a book which actively warns against essentialism as its ?essence?. Accordingly, I will say only that this is perhaps the missi...
  • Joseph Pfeffer
    Mar 05, 2019
    There is no such thing as identity. Humans cannot exist without identity. Therefore, to be human means having something that does not exist but without which we are nothing. So one might sumarize the message of Kwame Anthony Appiah's engaging, humane, wide-ranging, book, one ...