What If This Were Enough?

What If This Were Enough?

By the author of the New York Times Love and Relationships bestseller How to Be a Person in the World, an impassioned and inspiring collection about the expectations of modern life and the sweet imperfections of the everyday. Heather Havrilesky's writing has been called "whip-smart and profanely funny" (Entertainment Weekly) and "required reading for all humans" (Celeste N By the author of the New York Times Love and Relationships bestseller How to Be a Person in the World, an impassione...

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Title:What If This Were Enough?
Author:Heather Havrilesky
Rating:
Genres:Writing
ISBN:What If This Were Enough?: Essays
ISBN
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:240 pages pages

What If This Were Enough? Reviews

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    Oct 19, 2018
    Heather Havrilesky is an advice columnist and also known for her previous memoir, How to be a Person in the World. The essays are a mixture of advice for living and pop culture, sometimes in strange combinations. (One compares Selin in The Idiot by Elif Batuman to Mozart, which I d...
  • Renata
    Nov 05, 2018
    DNF after a few chapters. I was willing to give this a chance after her weird library Twitter kerfuffle--I do generally like Ask Polly--but the first few essays were soo very "remember what it was like before we all used our PHONES so much?" that I felt free to just nope on out of this...
  • Nicole
    Mar 04, 2019
    It wasn't. ...
  • Clara
    Sep 14, 2018
    I ?discovered? Heather Havrilesky through her ?Ask Polly? column in The Cut. Her new book of essays, What If This Were Enough?, displays the same smart, thoughtful perspective that makes ?Ask Polly? so compelling. As a unifying thread, Havrilesky explores the cultural me...
  • jeremy
    Oct 12, 2018
    everything cheerful seems to have an ominous shadow looming behind it now. the smallest images and bits of news can feel so invasive, so frightening. they erode our belief in what the world can and should be. heather havrilesky's what if this were enough? collects 19 essays, mingling ...
  • Alena
    Dec 08, 2018
    A book about never being happy, satisfied, or willing to believe you are enough. For the author, Disney is depressing - but she goes to Disneyland. Romantic love is an illusion - but she?s married. This book is exhausting and full of grievances and I only survived three chapters. I?...
  • Charly
    Oct 21, 2018
    Last night, after watching the first episode of Babylon Berlin, I fell asleep to the police scanner. A spurned ex, also a sex offender, had abducted and blown a bullet through the brain of a University of Utah student and dumped her body in a parking lot. I work at the University...
  • Lexi Wright
    Nov 12, 2018
    I was two-thirds done with my library copy, when I found a sizable crumb in the gutter as if it were some potent marginalia. I thought, "Thank god someone else has read this." Reading this felt like holding a mirror up to my face and finally feeling at peace with the muddle looking ...
  • Jana
    Apr 09, 2019
    So in a perfect world we would enjoy our lives (or not!) without the nonstop social commentary. We would see the total eclipse of the sun in our back yards without constant FB/IG narration and sharing with the planet. We would understand that the perfect world is NOT a perfect ...
  • Jenna
    Dec 23, 2018
    Really disappointed with this one, having also read Havrilesky's How to Be a Person in the World, and as a fairly regular reader of her Ask Polly column. I was really irritated by the tone of these essays - she has a complaint about nearly every group of people (foodies/minimalists/int...
  • Zara
    Apr 01, 2019
    I?m halfway through but I?m calling it. I?m just bored and frustrated. Havrilesky isn?t saying anything new, and she?s cynical in a way I don?t find amusing or useful. ...
  • Jennifer
    Jan 28, 2019
    Over the past few days, I've been reading the new collection of Heather Havrilesky's essays, What If This Were Enough? It's a subject I've talked about before here, the tension between sufficiency and lack. With the rise of Marie Kondo's tidying-up empire, it seems like everything i...
  • James Mustich
    Apr 25, 2019
    An insightful, incisive, engagingly written survey of the ethos of self-improvement that hugs us like a threatening and imprisoning blanket. ?What?s odd about American culture?and now pop culture at large?is how fervently it insists on keeping us all in a frothy state of upbeat...
  • Christopher Farnsworth
    Oct 13, 2018
    Reading this collection of Heather Havrilesky's essays, I had the same feeling as when I read Carolyn See's MAKING HISTORY or when I first heard Patton Oswalt. I saw someone saying what I thought and felt, but expressing it better than I ever had, or could. ...
  • Sarah
    Jan 01, 2019
    3.5 rounded up An overall incredibly solid collection of essays, focusing mainly on pop culture (celebrity, tv, books and movies) and the author's life (mostly revolving around her family). The pop culture essays remind me - at times - of the better essays in They Can't Kill Us U...
  • Perceptive
    Oct 18, 2018
    "Havrilesky takes on those cultural forces that shape us" but she has no idea libraries are under siege? This is why Trump won, Heather. Don't worry, I won't get your book at the library. Because I'm not buying it, period. ...
  • Janine
    Mar 21, 2019
    Heather Havrilesky's essays really capture this present moment for me - this endless sea of distractions we live in, this age of Instagram influencers and hack gurus, of Marie Kondo and self loathing, of "follow your passion!" and the shiny-screened phone that perpetually dings at us, ...
  • David Yoon
    Nov 23, 2018
    I've been a fan of Heather Havrilesky since the prehistoric days of the internet when she was writing for Suck.com. An ancient past when my pre-work routine would consist of reading long form stories called blogs, back when paragraphs weren't so intimidating. Thankfully our modern era,...
  • James (JD) Dittes
    Nov 23, 2018
    This is one of the best books of 2018 by a brilliant American woman. I found so much to like in this book. I even ended up re-reading three or four chapters out loud to my wife, who was similarly impressed. There is much that is quotable, and even more that is insightful. Conside...
  • Abby
    Mar 11, 2019
    ?Living simply today takes work. It takes work to overcome the noise that has accumulated in our heads, growing louder and more pervasive since we were young. It takes work to overcome the illusion that we will arrive at some end point where we will be better?more successful, adore...
  • Erin
    Mar 28, 2019
    Sometimes essay collections can be a little tricky - I find that often there are some really good pieces, but that I might not connect to all of them. This was exactly how I felt about Havrilesky's work. I was completely into some of the essays, and then felt a little blah about some o...
  • Lisa Carr
    Jan 21, 2019
    Nothing is beyond scrutiny in this book. Some of it I was ready to let go of -Disneyland chaos, 50 Shades of Grey twistedness. But Havrilesky also challenges our infatuations with Marie Kondo, Mad Men, the Pioneer Woman, and foodie culture. Uh oh. And yet, I hear her. I need her perspe...
  • Julie
    Oct 20, 2018
    This book is truly delightful. It is a series of stand-alone essays. At first, they seem a bit repetitive, but over the course of the book they branch out a bit. The overarching theme is that our society is organized into a superficially sunny facade, which is also built on the message...
  • Alexandra
    Oct 19, 2018
    I was so excited for this but in the end I couldn't even finish it. I felt like I got permission after the author's bizarre anti library comments on twitter. I get that wasn't the point she was trying to make, but much like this book, it came across convoluted, entitled, and annoying. ...
  • Timothy Haggerty
    Nov 04, 2018
    Well worth the read. I saw the title and I was sure I had to read it. I had been thinking about the same thing for a few days. I always wonder what it's all about. There are some very good insights and criticism at social media, TV and direction of our culture that rang true to this...
  • Jessie
    Dec 17, 2018
    While I really enjoyed Heather Havrilesky's last book of essays, this one left me scratching my head as to what the point of these essays was supposed to be. The book's jacket informs us that many of the essays have been expanded, so that might be the first major problem, as many of th...
  • Kristy K
    Sep 02, 2018
    3.5 Stars Havrilesky?s aptly named book of essays examines and critiques materialism, consumption, and our obsession with consumerism and the pursuit of happiness. Pulling largely from pop culture and current trends and fads, she delves into the world of foodies, 50 Shades, Disney...
  • Jeffrey
    Mar 25, 2019
    I really, really liked the idea of this essay collection since I believe it to be an incredibly important and relevant topic of conversation, especially in this day and age. However, it felt like the author lacked depth in her overall argument, since a lot of what she explains in the i...
  • Angela Pineda
    Nov 19, 2018
    1.5 stars that I?ll round up because it takes A LOT for me to give a book one star. Reading this I wondered if essay books aren?t for me since this is the second one this year I?ve immensely disliked.. but then I remembered how much I loved ?Not That Bad? by Roxanne Gay a...
  • Rose
    Jun 30, 2018
    I found this collection of essays to be well written. This would be great for fans of the authors column. I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a review copy in exchange for my honest and unbiased opinion of it. ...