Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World

Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World

An insider's groundbreaking investigation of how the global elite's efforts to "change the world" preserve the status quo and obscure their role in causing the problems they later seek to solve. Former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas takes us into the inner sanctums of a new gilded age, where the rich and powerful fight for equality and justice any way they can- An insider's groundbreaking investigation of how the global elite's efforts to "change the world" preserve the status...

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Title:Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World
Author:Anand Giridharadas
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0451493249
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:304 pages pages

Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World Reviews

  • Raghu
    Sep 13, 2018
    Philanthropy has been much in the news for decades now. In the past thirty years, there has been an explosion of chraitable giving in the US alone, rising from $25 billion in 1973 to $335 billion in 2013. Americans are a generous lot. Statistics show that 95.4% of US households gave to...
  • Trevor
    Sep 23, 2018
    This is another book recommended to me by Richard. In many ways this is a similar and perhaps an even better book than ?Small Change: Why business won?t save the world? by Michael Edwards. Under my review of that book Jan-Maat mentions Andrew Carnegie ? and he gets quite a run ...
  • Abby
    Oct 10, 2018
    In this book, Giridharadas points to the limits of market or philanthropic solutions for social problems and argues that such innovation may even weaken our existing social system by diverting pent-up demand for change. He critiques the changemaker industrial complex (of Davos, TED tal...
  • Kate
    Sep 19, 2018
    If I were going to give all of you a book for Christmas, this would be it. Giridharadas has an insider?s (and skeptic?s) view of globalists, people in what he calls MarketWorld, neoliberalists, an elite who really think the best way to solve social problems is for them to start the...
  • Mehrsa
    Aug 31, 2018
    This is an excellent book and a must-read! It's also totally readable and even quite funny at times. And it's the kind of book that you keep bringing up in conversation and then trailing off and saying---you just really have to read this book. The oversimplified thesis is that you can'...
  • Meredith
    Sep 15, 2018
    I ADORED this book. It was not without its flaws, including being super biased, one sided and judgmental, but I LOVED it. I?ve been a total MarketWorlder, assuming business was the best vehicle for making change and business school was the most effective way to learn now. And this bo...
  • Ted
    Oct 09, 2018
    It took me a bit to get into this one -- Giridharadas has some *very* strong, negative opinions about some beliefs that I consider -- or at least, have considered -- core to my professional trajectory over the past decade or so. A colleague of mine, in my same line of work, is even hig...
  • Carol Palmer
    Sep 21, 2018
    A few years ago, a conservative friend told me that conservatives are way more generous than liberals. Look at how much the Walton family gives away to set up charter schools. I told him that it would be even more generous if they paid Walmart employees a living wage so that their empl...
  • Steve Turtell
    Sep 06, 2018
    It's hard to argue with any of the blatantly obvious points Giridharadas makes, but in chapter after chapter his targets prove themselves immune to the criticism. The whole book is a collective portrait of a class well-described by Tolstoy in one of the book's epigraphs: ?I sit on...
  • Nils
    May 12, 2018
    Philanthropy exists mainly to enable the super-rich and super-powerful to defer any serious discussion of a serious reordering of power and wealth, argues Giridharadas. Through a series of vignettes both of the super-rich and super-powerful themselves, who prove themselves unable to co...
  • Rahul  Adusumilli
    Sep 11, 2018
    The Beatles carrying all the criticisms contained in this book: "She's so heavy!" Bill Gates contributing a quote for this book is one of the most ironic things. I wondered how a person so critical of the institutions was given access to the said institutions, and he revealed he him...
  • Paula Lyle
    Sep 10, 2018
    "Inspire the rich to do more good, but never, ever tell them to do less harm; inspire them to give back, but never, ever tell them to take less; inspire them to join the solution, but never, ever accuse them of being part of the problem." I say, sometimes, "How do those people sleep...
  • Patrick Bair
    Oct 10, 2018
    Extremely thought provoking. Nodded my head and said "Yeah!" on virtually every page. "If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the ...
  • Dana
    Sep 13, 2018
    I think this book is too close to my current research for me to get much out of it - if it already seems obvious to you that elite driven, pro-market type initiatives don't do much for the common good than this book might not offer much. And I found the last section on Trump grating - ...
  • Elliott Frank
    Sep 30, 2018
    One of the most important non-fiction books I?ve read in recent memory. It takes to task the notion that large-scale societal change can be achieved by the same people who benefit the most from the status queue. The prose are every bit as good as the detailed and clear-cut expl...
  • Linh
    Sep 14, 2018
    As someone who has dithered on the edges of "elites changing the world", much of this rings true and I believe (and grapple) with the tension between the sometimes necessary power/influence/fortune needed, as we strive for justice and equity. An article that I always refer back to is N...
  • Greg
    Sep 04, 2018
    We live in a world where every SV exec and company, even ones laughably so (Coca-Cola? Facebook?) claim to be changing the world for the better, doing good and are involved in charitable donations. With so much charity and well-meaning, why hasn't the average American seen an income ch...
  • Dan Connors
    Sep 24, 2018
    This book was definitely an eye-opener for me. As one who deals with charities and non-profits some, it saddened me to see how much that world is being abused by those with the most money to spare. The richest 1% have managed to grow in power and influence over the past decades so t...
  • Bilal Baydoun
    Sep 09, 2018
    ?If anyone truly believes that the same ski-town conferences and fellowship programs, the same politicians and policies, the same entrepreneurs and social businesses, the same campaign donors, the same thought leaders, the same consulting firms and protocols, the same philanthropists...
  • Paul Ark
    Sep 27, 2018
    A phenomenally thought-provoking book examining the myths and fallacies of change and problem solving via market-driven solutions advocated by global elites seeking win-win solutions that fail to address the root causes of problems for which those elites may be the very causes or enabl...
  • Jinie Choi
    Sep 08, 2018
    Challenged every view I've held of tech philanthropists, and corporate philanthropy. As a believer in profit and private companies accelerating innovations to help these causes, it made me revisit foundations of my beliefs and confront my biases. ...
  • Jane Comer
    Sep 29, 2018
    A unique perspective on wealthy "do-gooders" who seek to change the world without recognizing their contributions to systemic problems in our country. The "winners" have won largely on the back of those they now seek to help; yet they address "poverty" rather than "inequality". They ta...
  • Theresa
    Oct 09, 2018
    Giridharadas, a former Aspen Institute fellow, uses his experience behind the scenes with the world's global elite to question their motives and philanthropy. His thesis revolves around the idea that business models can solve the world's problems with poverty, economics, and social jus...
  • Stevo Brock
    Sep 02, 2018
    This book was Stevo's Business Book of the Week for the week of 9/2, as selected by Stevo's Book Reviews on the Internet: http://forums.delphiforums.com/stevo1. https://amzn.to/2CcDbWp ...
  • John Spiller
    Sep 06, 2018
    "Winners Take All" is an important and timely book. Giridharadas examines the fundamental limitations and contradictions of those who work for social change from a position of wealth and prestige. His central theme is "the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house," that i...
  • Karen Adkins
    Oct 04, 2018
    For years, I have been ranting about MBA folks thinking they know how to fix education, despite their never stepping foot in a classroom (or maybe doing a TFA stint). Giridharadas articulates this position so completely and extends it to all spheres of government; he makes a compelling...
  • Trey McIntyre
    Sep 28, 2018
    I disagree with soooo much in this book, but it is thought-provoking. The mot aggravating part is, I think, the lack of a clear counter-proposal to the problems he sees. It?s clearly implied, of course, but he doesn?t elaborate. ...
  • Michael Tackett
    Sep 14, 2018
    I found this a very enjoying read that really helped me coalesce some recent thoughts I've had recently on the subject. I first heard about the book on the Ezra Klein podcast (I would recommend listening to it as well to get Ezra's questions) and decided it was worth a try. It was. ...
  • Cesar
    Sep 30, 2018
    Winners Take All is the hardest book I have ever read. Not because it was inaccessible or esoteric, but because it forced a long overdue look in the mirror. Being in the tech industry I?ve been swept up in thought leadership, heroic philanthropy, and the promise of innovation to ...
  • Hector Mujica
    Sep 28, 2018
    This book was an excellent read. It captures the tension best represented by the Oscar Wilde quote: "Just as the worst slave-owners were those who were kind to their slaves, and so prevented the horror of the system being realized by those who suffered from it, and understood by those ...