The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present

A sweeping history--and counter-narrative--of Native American life from the Wounded Knee massacre to the present. Dee Brown's 1970 Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee was the first truly popular book of Indian history ever published. But it promulgated the impression that American Indian history essentially ended with the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee--that not only did one hun A sweeping history--and counter-narrative--of Native American life from the Wounded Knee massacre to the present. ...

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Title:The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present
Author:David Treuer
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:B077CNXS7B
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:526 pages pages

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present Reviews

  • Bookworm
    Feb 10, 2019
    Had read 'Rez Life' and 'Prudence' by the same author and was very excited to read this book. I did not care for 'Prudence' but was totally absorbed by 'Rez'. I was curious to see what this was about, especially when I realized it was about Native people in the US after 1890 instead of...
  • Sara
    Feb 01, 2019
    The actual only true non-immigrant Americans, Native Americans have been treated abysmally. Many of us know this history and it is appalling. After a quick review of this history, the author takes us past that into the current showing us how Native Americans are finally thriving often ...
  • Kate Schwarz
    Feb 15, 2019
    Decades ago when I was an undergraduate student at Seattle University, I took a class called "Native American Politics and Protest," taught by Professor Richard Young. Dr. Young had wanted to call the class "Cowboys and Indians," but the administration (rightly) suggested otherwise. Th...
  • Theresa Connors
    Feb 17, 2019
    This book is a well-researched and important counternarrative chronicling the atrocities suffered by tribes across the United States at various points in history, from 1492 to Standing Rock. Extremely well-researched with personal stories and interviews that you won't find in history ...
  • Dirk
    Feb 20, 2019
    With the exception of the title, which strikes me as a mismatched metaphor, The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee, is a very impressive work. Among the many points that Treuer makes is that although Indians (his term of choice) have a history of loss, they are very much present and should not ...
  • Emily Goenner
    Feb 11, 2019
    How can I not know the things written here? As Anglo-Americans, we've been taught such lies and shaded stories. This book gives a different side, another heart-breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America. I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified ...
  • Elisa
    Mar 03, 2019
    More than a helpful review of all the ways native Americans have been deceived and trampled upon, this book records the dexterity and political intelligence with which they have responded to attempts at legal and economic control. Enjoyed the many details and stories; really appreciate...
  • Mike
    Feb 16, 2019
    This powerful and sweeping book on the history of Native people in this continent from prehistory through to today, is one of the most moving and engaging history books I have read in my life. The very best lessons of history come from the authors who dare to show us the answers to que...
  • Raimo Wirkkala
    Mar 14, 2019
    This mix of the scholarly, journalistic, and the personal, makes for a fascinating account of Native American history. Treuer, himself an Ojibwe from not so far from where I live, spares us nothing of the violence, deceit, hypocrisy, and tragedy that is endemic to this history but allo...
  • Loring Wirbel
    Mar 02, 2019
    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn't want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen's In the Spirit of Crazy Horse. Rather than emphasize tragedy and the r...
  • Joe Kessler
    Feb 13, 2019
    As the title suggests, this is a book that's very much in conversation with Dee Brown's classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which I regret to say I haven't yet read. Like that earlier volume, this 2019 follow-up centers its Native American history in the perspective of indigenous pe...
  • Tom Gorski
    Feb 10, 2019
    As with his earlier book about his reservation experience, David Treuer writes a very readable yet comprehensive study of the Native American life in all parts of the country from 1890 (Wounded Knee massacre) to the present. Noted though are the first 90 pages which provide a backgroun...
  • Jon Glazer
    Mar 01, 2019
    This frequently frustrating book was largely redeemed by the last chapter. For most of the book the author couldn't seem to settle on a narrative approach and I was often distracted by the rapid shifts between broad historical descriptions, close-up character studies, and straightforwa...
  • Janice
    Feb 22, 2019
    After a trip to the American Southwest, I realized how little I knew about the American Indian in American history. The American history that I was taught in school included so little about Native Americans. Recently, I saw a T.V. interview with David Treuer about his most recent book....
  • Christa
    Mar 08, 2019
    Very informative, easy to read, great research. It is really interesting to follow the rise of a bee generation of natives albeit the oppression and pillage of their homelands. Really enjoyed reading this book. Very informative, easy to read, great research. It is really interesting...
  • Peter Heisler
    Mar 12, 2019
    This work is expansive in scope, and its varied tellings of what it means to be Indian (through historical accounts, interviews, and the author's personal experiences) are welcome changes of pace in a long book. The thesis--that we need to look at how our country has treated and labele...
  • Cheryl Turoczy hart
    Mar 12, 2019
    I saw the author interviewed on PBS News Hour and thought this book might be interesting because it was written to offer a description of Native American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. Actually, it starts out with some pre-Columbian history so you might say it offers a desc...
  • Randall Wallace
    Feb 17, 2019
    Wizard of Oz author L. Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, ?Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one more wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.? Charming. By the 1600?s th...
  • Joanna
    Feb 12, 2019
    Reads like a long long talk with a very smart and well informed friend. Strong and honest and gutsy writing with flashes of humour throughout. Discursive style ? slight hints of Galeano Eduardo ? makes it hard to see where he?s going at the beginning, but it all hangs together by...
  • Deborah
    Feb 21, 2019
    The only real reason I didn't give this book five stars is because he made short work of New England Indians. They seem to have been all killed off in first Contact or went West instead of settling to live rich lives here . I wish there had been some sense of our tribes, particularly o...
  • Patrick Macke
    Feb 15, 2019
    To tell the story of Native Americans from Wounded Knee to now actually required telling what felt like a capsulized version of the complete history of Indians, and in accomplishing this alone the author is to be commended ... it is well written and meticulously researched but despite ...
  • Angie
    Jan 06, 2019
    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction: a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity. He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and th...
  • Jen
    Feb 28, 2019
    Interesting history and perspective of the many Indian Nations from BCE to today. The comparison of the European treatment of Natives and the American Indian?s strategy of how to fight back was well done. Although shockingly violent and sad, the author makes a very good argument of t...
  • David Schwinghammer
    Mar 12, 2019
    David Treuer's book emphasizes what happened after the massacre at Wounded Knee. Prior to Lyndon Johnson' ?War on Poverty? government legislation concerning Native Americans seemed to involve attempts at assimilation of the Indians. This included boarding schools and allotment....
  • David Dunlap
    Mar 01, 2019
    Native American author Treuer does an amazing job in this book. Although his concentration (as the subtitle indicates) is on Indian matters following the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, he gives an overview of relations between the indigenous peoples of North America and t...
  • Alison Labbate
    Feb 02, 2019
    Good NYT book review ...
  • Meike
    Feb 27, 2019
    "If you want to know America - if you want to see it for what it is - you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present." In a mixture of history book, reportage, and mémoir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, a...
  • Greg
    Mar 05, 2019
    This was a good book. It fills an important niche--there are few comprehensive accounts of "modern" Indian history (that is to say, history since the end of tribal military resistance) and David Treuer fills that gap marvelously. For the average non-Indian person, this book will be a f...
  • Peter Beck
    Feb 06, 2019
    "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee" is a path-breaking work on the Native American experience. It is actually much more than the title suggests because the first 100 pages explore Indian life before 1890. It is also far more than just a dry history book. Treuer takes us foraging for pine c...
  • Trey Lathe
    Feb 23, 2019
    I will agree with most of the reviewers. Though I enjoyed the stories and interviews for the most part, and the history was fascinating and enlightening, the two threads of the narrative didn?t mesh particularly well. That said, the book was a great read and I think along with 149...