The Last Whalers: Three Years in the Far Pacific with a Courageous Tribe and a Vanishing Way of Life

The Last Whalers: Three Years in the Far Pacific with a Courageous Tribe and a Vanishing Way of Life

A "magnificent book" (Sebastian Junger) and "monumental achievement" (Mitchell Zuckoff) that tells the epic story of the world's last subsistence whalers and the threats posed to a tribe on the brink "An extraordinary feat of reportage and illumination." --Leslie Jamison, The Empathy Exams. "From the very first lines, I was riveted." --Robert Moor, On Trails. "A true work A "magnificent book" (Sebastian Junger) and "monumental achievement" (Mitchell Zuckoff) that tells the epic story of...

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Title:The Last Whalers: Three Years in the Far Pacific with a Courageous Tribe and a Vanishing Way of Life
Author:Doug Bock Clark
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0316390623
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:368 pages pages

The Last Whalers: Three Years in the Far Pacific with a Courageous Tribe and a Vanishing Way of Life Reviews

  • Liana
    Jan 12, 2019
    This is a rich and wonderfully crafted book. Clark does an excellent job of laying out the intricacies of the tribe's history, blending of local beliefs and Catholicism, personal relationships, and factors pushing individual people and larger change. There is a lot of detail, but he cr...
  • Marsha
    Apr 06, 2019
    What an amazing book that allows the reader to enter a world in modern times that is rooted far in the past. Clark takes us inside the life of the tribe, families and into the day to day challenges of individual tribe members. They are hunters and they face their large prey in close pr...
  • Kate Schwarz
    Mar 20, 2019
    This book was a quality reminder of my days as a Peace Corps Volunteer, when I lived far away in Thailand, immersing myself in another culture. Similarly, Clark lives among the Lamalarans, a small tribe on one small island in Indonesia. He is drawn to their culture's generosity, clearl...
  • Jenn Warner
    Apr 04, 2019
    Well written, fascinating account of life of one of the few remaining indigenous tribes in the world and how modernity is encroaching on their way of life. The hunting scenes were difficult for me to read but I liked this overall ...
  • David
    Jan 25, 2019
    Clark lives among the Lamalerans, a hunter-gatherer group in Eastern Indonesia. They have merged Catholicism and their own beliefs to interpret a changing world. They are especially identified via their whale hunts and their truly cooperative and democratic way of life. But that lifest...
  • Scott
    Feb 27, 2019
    For three years journalist Doug Bock Clark lived on a remote Indonesian island with the Lamalerans, a tribe of some 1,500 who, as the world's last subsistence whale hunters, harvest their food (sperm whales when they're lucky but also manta rays, porpoises, and whale sharks) by leaping...
  • Mike
    Feb 03, 2019
    The author spent time over three years with the isolated Lamalaren tribe of Eastern Indonesia, learning their language and culture (at least as much as he could) to the point where some of them considered him a part of their tribe. Not only does he write about the trials and tribulatio...
  • Ned Frederick
    Mar 12, 2019
    I gave it my sincere best shot but I couldn?t get past the Cetacean extermination. I know, I know the Lamerlans live a subsistence lifestyle totally based on harvesting whales, dolphins, etc. They are a brave and resilient people whose impact on the global Sperm whale population is a...
  • Alex
    Jan 21, 2019
    Remarkable. Clark paints a vivid and unflinching portrait of life for a community in Indonesia that is - in ways large and small - wrestling with their hunter-gatherer past and an encroaching modern culture. Rather than romanticize the indigenous for its own sake (as many Westerners se...
  • Amanda Drucker
    Feb 16, 2019
    This is a remarkable book. Clark depicts the Lamalerans in an intimate and honest way, as only someone who dedicated time over years, getting to know the people, their culture, and even learning their language, could. The writing style is absolutely beautiful?I found myself re-readin...
  • John Temple
    Apr 21, 2019
    As a journalist, I'm in awe of what Clark did here. He not only documents the struggle of this hunter-gatherer tribe's ongoing confrontation with modernity, he does so through the lens of a small group of interrelated characters who he portrays with more intimacy than most novels. Inne...
  • Wonjun Lee
    Jan 12, 2019
    The Last Whalers is an absolutely extraordinary work. Clark?s portrayal of the Lamalerans, a hunter-gatherer tribe inhabiting a remote Indonesian island, is both fascinating and moving. He expertly shows how the Lamalerans hunt the largest carnivore in history, the sperm whale, using...
  • Allie
    Jan 15, 2019
    The author has the rare gift of weaving together years of stories and collective memories into a flowing, eloquent narrative. By the end of the book, I felt that I really knew the characters, flaws, strengths and all. I can?t wait to read future works by Clark! ...
  • Pat
    Mar 05, 2019
    This was an extraordinary, and difficult, book to read. The Lamalareans are an indigenuous society, located at the far eastern tip of Indonesia. For centuries, their way of life had not changed, and their religion, culture and society were intertwined with the Way of the Ancestors. The...
  • Nate Hendrix
    May 16, 2019
    An interesting view into the lives of a native Indonesian tribe that hunts whales from canoes. This book covers several years where their lives change significantly. Outboard motors are introduced as well as nets for fishing. ...
  • Mark Mortensen
    Apr 20, 2019
    I found this history of a present day Lamaleran tribe that exists on a remote Indonesian volcanic island, by harpooning whales for subsistence, to be quite fascinating. Tribal members are proud of their hunter-gatherer culture, which cannot remain isolated forever. After many centuries...
  • Ben
    Feb 05, 2019
    Unfortunately, this was just far too much mundane detail than I cared to read. It is all detail, with no plot or distinctive characters. The Outside magazine article is enough for me. Moreover, I don't agree at all with the author's editorial stance on the Lamalerans and the importance...
  • Leslie
    Apr 29, 2019
    Read this book after reading an article about Otto Warmbier by the author that struck me as exceptionally well reported. The Last Whalers was beautifully written and intimately reported from page 1. Around page 30, I wondered, do I really want to read an entire book about this? Rea...
  • Laura
    Apr 26, 2019
    Certainly interesting and connecting. But did not care for the omniscient narrator in a nonfiction of living people, which seems odd and problematic. The narrative itself could have used more science and natural history than pages of detailed day by day of everyone's inner thoughts. It...
  • Sylvia Johnson
    Mar 01, 2019
    A very personal view of our fast-changing world and its incursions into ancient cultures. I enjoyed getting to know these individuals, their world view, their families and ancestors and the beliefs and community that sustains them. ...
  • Jim Tracy
    May 11, 2019
    All of the foreign terms and names made this book not for me. ...
  • Patrick Macke
    May 01, 2019
    Although the book as a whole can be tedious, as a body of research and as an anthropological study the author makes an impressive and valuable contribution ... and in the reading, some interesting questions arise: Does wildlife exist to provide human companionship or human sustenance? ...
  • Mike Clarken
    Mar 25, 2019
    A review I had read that led me to this book discussed the beauty of its writing first, the crafting of the story told, and the rare skill of description wielded by its author, and that the narrative, though incredible, and the reporting, though truly timely and exotic, were even outsh...
  • Verne
    Jan 15, 2019
    Great book. ...
  • Nancy
    Feb 16, 2019
    One family, one heart, one action, one goal. Lamaleran saying Lembata, in Southeast Asia, is home to the Lamalerans who arrived there 500 years ago. They settled on the beach under a cliff, surviving by fishing for sperm whale and Manta ray and flying fish. Those who are successful ...
  • Dave
    Feb 12, 2019
    This is an honest "warts and all" portrait of one of the last surviving hunter-gatherer cultures on the planet. It reads a little more like a novel than most typical anthropology books, which most people will probably like even though I personally don't prefer that writing style. He do...
  • Robin Lafond
    May 07, 2019
    For a book in a genre I don't normally find interesting, proto-anthropology, this book was especially compelling. I found myself wondering throughout the day what else about Lamaleran culture there was to discover. It's a well written story that weaves together real interviews with hi...
  • Jenn
    Feb 12, 2019
    I won a copy of this book. These are the kinds of book I really love to win and read. It's such a remarkable story about a tribe of people on the verge of, basically, extinction. The outside world is encroaching on them and they're losing to what it has to offer. The youngsters in t...
  • Marc Efron
    Apr 22, 2019
    The last subsistence whalers are confronted by inevitable modernity. Vividly told. A great read. ...
  • Smiley938
    May 16, 2019
    Surprisingly boring. The author clearly learned a lot about whaling, but all the detail is just extraneous and not interesting. I think the society and culture has a story worth telling, but this book didn't do it justice. ...