A Cruelty Special to Our Species: Poems

A Cruelty Special to Our Species: Poems

A piercing debut collection of poems exploring gender, race, and violence from a sensational new talent In her arresting collection, urgently relevant for our times, poet Emily Jungmin Yoon confronts the histories of sexual violence against women, focusing in particular onKoreanso-called ?comfort women,? women who were forced into sexual labor in Japanese-occupied territo A piercing debut collection of poems exploring gender, race, and violence from a sensational new talent In h...

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Title:A Cruelty Special to Our Species: Poems
Author:Emily Jungmin Yoon
Rating:
Genres:Poetry
ISBN:0062843699
Edition Language:English
Format Type:ebook
Number of Pages:80 pages pages

A Cruelty Special to Our Species: Poems Reviews

  • Matt
    Aug 28, 2018
    You think you know how cruel humans can be... and then you hear stories that are bravely, unflinchingly, uncompromisingly told like this ...
  • Jenna
    Oct 22, 2018
    I've long known Yoon's work via the poetry salons of New York City as well as via her role as poetry editor for the Asian American Writers Workshop's literary magazine The Margins, so I was eager to finally read this. I've read countless debut poetry collections over the past decade...
  • Kathleen
    Jun 04, 2018
    Our Q&A for the Poetry Foundation: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/arti... The poet Emily Jungmin Yoon believes that art reminds us that ?dissent can manifest itself in beautiful and complex forms.? Born in Busan, the second-largest city in South Korea, Yoon recently publis...
  • Andrea Blythe
    Dec 11, 2018
    My first podcast interview at New Books in Poetry is live! I had a lovely conversation withEmily Jungmin Yoonregarding herfirst full-length collection,A Cruelty Special to Our Species(Ecco Books, 2018), whichexamines forms of violence against women. At its core these ...
  • Charlie
    Jan 07, 2019
    Emily Jungmin Yoon presents a striking collection of poems of testament and remembrance for the Korean 'comfort women' forced to be sexual slaves to Japanese soldiers. Yoon does a lot of important historico-literary work here, and the poems meet the ethical and aesthetic demands of the...
  • Katya Kazbek
    Oct 12, 2018
    I?ve been dying to read about the tragic history of ?comfort women? since I, an immigrant to the US, and not that well-versed on East Asian history, first heard about them on the radio. And this poetry book with an absolutely incomparable name became the unlikely but satisfying r...
  • Peycho Kanev
    Feb 17, 2019
    Fear I wanted to carve it out of me? become a fjord flanked by historic cliffs. How else could I write the years I did not live. I wanted the space for fear emptied, teem with lives like the black-and-white photos of Max Desfor?s. I don?t know what I expected to feel ...
  • Will
    Jan 11, 2019
    Yoon's poems are powerful and haunting. This is one of my favorite books I read this year. Yoon's poems are ethereal and guttural and so so evocative. I simultaneously sped through this collection but waited a day to read the final sections of poems because I didn't want it to end. ...
  • Jeffrey Parker
    Sep 29, 2018
    A compelling and powerful collection that centers around the personal history Comfort Women and the continuing impact over generations. But the story is not that simple. These poems show echoes of that impact in the way a young women navigates through the world. These poems show how ch...
  • Patti K
    Apr 06, 2019
    Yoon's book of poems was published in 2018 to acclaim. As she writes in a Note: "I wrote this book to say that one has the agency to command and preserve their own narrative." Several of the poems are entitled: "An Ordinary Misfortune" which belies the horror of nearly every piece ...
  • Jayde Meng
    Jan 13, 2019
    My favorite poems: - An Ordinary Misfortune (3): A strong start to the anthology. Interesting transitions and colons. - An Ordinary Misfortune (11): Nice repetition with a change- reveals each layer to the poem like an onion. - Kang Duk-kyung (18): This one made me cry. I'm sorry w...
  • Linda
    Dec 30, 2018
    Yoon's poems are about memory, history, and identity. Her poems about the comfort women are powerful and haunting as they weave back and forth across time and place, but the ones that stood out to me were about the experiences and challenges of navigating life in the United States as a...
  • Mya
    Oct 27, 2018
    An arresting collection that draws attention to individual experiences of Korean women from a not-long-gone past, whose history has been forgotten by contemporary desire to forget humanity?s most inhumane actions. What emerges is a searing and mystifyingly lyrical investigation of Ja...
  • Emily
    Sep 02, 2018
    It's been years since I was consistently reading poetry, but I am trying to get back into it. I was a little bit hesitant about accepting A Cruelty Special to Our Species for review, but I am so glad that I did. Emily Jungmin Yoon's collection is heartbreaking and thought-provoking. Sh...
  • Samantha
    Sep 20, 2018
    An arresting and moving collection about Korean "comfort women" during WWII that is so well-thought-out and put together, in terms of taking hold of a narrative that hasn't been widely shared (and the importance of that, given the surviving comfort women are in their 90s). And beautifu...
  • Keishla
    Jan 18, 2019
    This was POWERFUL. I felt my anxiety creeping while I read this because of unsettling and horrible some of things these "comfort women" experienced. I was left in physical pain... but there are realities we need to write and read about. ...
  • Esther
    Dec 12, 2018
    This was good, but I'm not going to tell every poetry lover in my life to run out and buy it. I love poetry that fuses the personal and the historical, but this focused so much on the historical that it was easy to lose Yoon's voice and experience. "Bell Theory," which is entirely abou...
  • Noah
    Feb 08, 2019
    "The trouble with trees is that their bodies and limbs are too capable, capable of burning, of living, capable of leaves, of leaving, charcoal ash, and we think we have power." This is a short, devastating collection. Covering difficult subjects from the sex slavery of Korean comfor...
  • Carla Sofia Ferreira
    Dec 21, 2018
    Absolutely stunning! Listened to this on audiobook & Yoon's reading was gorgeous. ...
  • Felicity LuHill
    Dec 29, 2018
    Powerful and at times difficult to read. Yoon has given a voice to these women in unexpected ways. Her own personal experiences are just as powerfully told. ...
  • Leon
    Mar 20, 2019
    I generally shy away from Poetry, but lately it has struck my fancy. This book has to be my favorite read this year. The author, surprisingly, penetrated my emotional vulnerabilities with a few of her poems and humanized my usual technical and solemn perusing of books, all in a cathart...
  • Dorie
    Apr 15, 2019
    A Cruelty Special To Our Species:Poems by Emily Jungmin Yoon 2018 Harper Collins 4.5 / 5.0 This packs so much emotion, fear, and heartbreak, it is hard to grasp. The poems here share the brutality and sexual violence against women. Specifically, Korean comfort women, women ...
  • anna
    Dec 18, 2018
    sharp and searing. i hate to put in names but perhaps the lite version of warsan shire's stuffs. admirably succinct and modern but so steeped in generational trauma and violence. history can never be laid to rest, even more the personal ones. ...
  • Danielle
    Feb 18, 2019
    Collection of poems showing the mental and physical anguish of comfort women, how it feels like to be a ?foreigner?, and the sheer power of the Korean language in its multiple forms/definitions. ...
  • Philip Obaza
    Mar 25, 2019
    A striking and poignant collection of poems addressing the suffering and survival of Korean "comfort women" during World War II. As informative as it is unsettling; a reflection of how sexism, racism, and misogyny ripple across cultures and time through the present day. ...
  • G
    Mar 06, 2019
    Yoon's combination of language and imagery especially as she grapples with trauma and dislocation, took my breath away. I appreciated the "Ordinary Misfortunes" prose poems. Taken together they build upon each other in ways that are rather like watching a painter lay down brushstrokes....
  • Nhi
    Oct 27, 2018
    there were several times i wanted to just...close this book, put it out of my mind, forget i ever read it, because it was just too much. the sorrow, the unresolved grief. speaking of grief here are some lines from one of my favorites: Colonial-era Japanese historians were sure the ...
  • Lauren
    Dec 06, 2018
    A hauntingly beautiful and layered collection of poetry about a piece of Korean history that is largely forgotten to the world, but painfully real and present to those it continues to impact. The poems are dense, but economical in their length so that you won't lose their meaning as yo...
  • GHP
    Nov 08, 2018
    Pure. Fire. Read it. ...
  • Clemlucian (🏳️‍🌈the brooding villain)
    Oct 26, 2018
    Rating:??? I?m disappointed. The beginning is good because I wasn?t used to the format or the theme but all the poems say the same thing: Korean women have been through hell. The poems are shocking and horrible but well written although sometimes I got lost in one but ...