Us vs. Them: The Failure of Globalism

Us vs. Them: The Failure of Globalism

"A cogent analysis of the concurrent Trump/Brexit phenomena and a dire warning about what lies ahead...a lucid, provocative book." --Kirkus Reviews Those who championed globalization once promised a world of winners, one in which free trade would lift all the world's boats, and extremes of left and right would give way to universally embraced liberal values. The past few y "A cogent analysis of the concurrent Trump/Brexit phenomena and a dire warning about what lies ahead...a lucid, provo...

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Title:Us vs. Them: The Failure of Globalism
Author:Ian Bremmer
Rating:
Genres:Politics
ISBN:B074DG6K8K
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:208 pages pages

Us vs. Them: The Failure of Globalism Reviews

  • Thehounddawg
    Jun 04, 2018
    Very interesting book with a wealth of information but based on an anti-globalism outlook that begins with conclusions and searches for rationale. While there is much to learn here about our country and a dozen selected countries around the world, I believe the author makes various ass...
  • Brendan
    Aug 28, 2018
    Not a great book to read (but it is fairly short) if you want to feel hopeful about the future anywhere in the world (not just the US). This book has gathered together all of the data and trends about socioeconomic inequality going on and mashed it together while attempting to assess w...
  • Fraser Kinnear
    Sep 12, 2018
    A mixed bag for me. Much of the book is marinating you in statistics that provide context for how inequality and a feeling of insecurity in the US and abroad are creating fragility in our governments and societies. Early on, Bremmer summarizes the problem we appear to be facing in the ...
  • Jed
    May 19, 2018
    Telling it like it is & likely to be Bremmer is a perception observer and analyst. Ian Bremmer: "No one voted for Donald Trump because he believed the United States was growing more secure and more prosperous. In a country where working-age men without jobs outnumber thos...
  • David
    Jun 02, 2018
    Excellent analysis of the political, economic, and cultural problems facing the world. However, Bremmer's solutions slip into Progressive/Socialist cant failing to fully grasp human psychology and the immensity of the problem facing the OECD and emerging nations now and in the near fut...
  • Myles
    May 10, 2018
    An executive summary of platitudes framed as if they'll blow your mind. If you have functioning eyes and a subscription to the Guardian, you'll be able to spit this shit out in your sleep. ...
  • Rob Anderson
    Jun 11, 2018
    Lots of talented and smart writers seem to be rushing out works that analyze the alarming state of the world today. In so doing, they are giving us what seem to be short and rather basic ?primers? on the madness of current U.S. and global politics, and this book is exactly that. It...
  • James Bingham
    May 04, 2018
    This is an interesting book, but it reads more like an extended recap than any sort of in-depth analysis. There are a few summaries of problems being faced by specific countries around the world, which I found helpful, and a longer summary of why Bremmer thinks globalism has failed. Bu...
  • Matt Schiavenza
    May 08, 2018
    Ian Bremmer's latest book is a breezy tour d'horizon of contemporary global affairs that offers little fresh insight and makes no real argument. The theme, such as there is one, is that populist movements have gained power across the world and that the neoliberal moment that emerged in...
  • Ken Hamner
    Aug 18, 2018
    Excellent book. It describes many of the failures, or at least limited success of the multilateral trade agreements. It doesn't condone protectionism, but it rightly points out that many of the US trading partners engage in activity that is protectionist and nationalist while professin...
  • Ivank
    Apr 28, 2018
    Ian Bremmer remains a strong story-teller, doing what he's always done best - expressing crystal-clear concepts and thoughts, and presenting International Relations for non-specialists. Yet the book is short, covers a billion ideas very superficially, and is some weird combination o...
  • Ryan Rommann
    May 05, 2018
    I generally like Bremmer's books (G-Zero, End of the Free Market, J-curve etc) but this book seemed lazy. It didn't seem well thought out nor researched. Very little in Us vs Them will strike you as enlightening, if you've been alive the past 2 years. His other books have a rather nove...
  • Michael Huang
    Aug 29, 2018
    Unless you were living in a cave for a while, this book summarizes what you saw in the news. The increasing globalism didn't benefit everybody equally. Automation further intensified the inequity. Those who suffered made the populist movements gain traction. Le Pen didn't win but it...
  • Patrick Moore
    Aug 04, 2018
    Best for 2018 I thoroughly enjoyed this book, although it challenges the values of my existing world view as a globalist. I found the first half a descent into the PIT of depression that nags us all - spun around by what seems to be sudden madness. Bremner presents a bleak and somew...
  • Burt Schoeppe
    Jun 13, 2018
    Terrible. Really, really bad. Didn't get what the purpose of this book was. Instead of dismissing populism, perhaps a real attempt at understanding why it is becoming more prevalent in the world. Instead of dismissing Donald Trump, perhaps an acknowledgment of why he succeeded. It's...
  • Gabbi Levy
    Apr 24, 2018
    My interview with Ian Bremmer: IF THE SIX AND A HALF decades that followed the end of World War II were a triumph of globalism, an era of prosperity and peace as the world grew increasingly interconnected, the second decade of the 21st century has seen the rise of a new populism tha...
  • High Plains Library District
    Jun 14, 2018
    While the title of this book presents a view of the possible causes of growing anxiety (fear) in the U. S. and other countries, the author has narrowed by circumstance a cause, namely change. Influences such as increasing rates of immigration in certain countries have forced first worl...
  • Eddie Choo
    Apr 26, 2018
    A summary of developments Ian Bremmer describes the tendencies that have caused ruptures in the politics of major countries. He takes a politics-first view and describes how trends might affect the politics-society relationship. Provides a good overview of the developments, but not ...
  • Amanda Hunsberger
    Jul 09, 2018
    Could've used more detail in certain areas, but overall a good summary of the current state of affairs. Did not go much into possible solutions. ...
  • Joshua Shumate
    Jun 28, 2018
    I like Bremmer, but this book offers limited original content and does little more than restate the problems produced by globalism that you have likely already encountered. No real solutions. No unique insight. It reads like a book-length The Atlantic article and not like the research ...
  • Gary Moreau
    Apr 24, 2018
    Really, a 4.5. The ?us/them? division is global in scale and catastrophic in scope. It is already testing our civility, our security, our cultural identity, and our commitment to the ideals of democracy. But you already know that. This is the latest in a growing list of book...
  • John DeRosa
    Jul 04, 2018
    Seems a mere regurgitation of a close reading of newspaper and magazine reporting ...
  • Konrad von Pless
    Aug 05, 2018
    A readable overview of the problems facing both emerging and developed economies in the near future. Its lack of depth is understandable, as the idea is to give a horizon overview of the global situation. However, the title is a tad misleading, as the us vs them dynamic is mentioned pr...
  • Anthony
    Jul 21, 2018
    Read it in two sittings. For all of Bremmer's qualities as a thinker and writer (and there are many), this book glosses over the great inflection point of our time without any real offered insight. Disappointing.... ...
  • Victoria
    May 07, 2018
    The Future Will Be Here Thought provoking and easy to understand. This made me see through someone else?s eyes. And made me realize I am not alone in my fear, that all of us are feeling our way in the dark. The future is coming, what it is and how we live in it. That?s the que...
  • William J Neville
    May 19, 2018
    Ian Brenner presents a wake-up call to global governments Great amount of statistical background behind this book. the author paints a somewhat grim picture of what's to come for many counties if their governments don't update their social contract with their own citizens. But, he...
  • Felipe CZ
    Aug 29, 2018
    According to the author, globalism has created winners and losers, and an "us vs. Them" mentality. The impacts of globalism have had an effect on economies and politics, making less people believe that the world is becoming a better place and instead has enhanced cultural anxieties in ...
  • Robert Narojek
    Jul 11, 2018
    I am a bit surprised, to say the least! I like reading books and I read quite a lot on very diverse subject matters. Also I listen to people recommending ?good books?, sometimes these favourable opinions of others are not entirely in-line with my experience of reading given book...
  • Amy C.
    Jun 20, 2018
    Ian Bremmer expertly elucidates the shortcomings of globalism in this miniature guide. With the ascension of political polarization occurring in both industrialized and developing countries, a world in which the government ensures egalitarianism rather than tribalism is more imperative...
  • Tom Walsh
    Jun 19, 2018
    Bremmer knows today?s World I?ve always been a follower of Ian Bremmer?s analyses of the state of the world?s governments. Here again he has painted a picture of a Populist plague gradually infecting America, The EU and Eastern Europe. No doubt it will blanket the rest of th...