You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between

You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between

For readers of Atul Gawande and Jerome Groopman, a book of beautifully crafted stories about what life is like for patients kept alive by modern medical technology. Modern medicine is a world that glimmers with new technology and cutting-edge research. To the public eye, medical stories often begin with sirens and flashing lights and culminate in survival or death. But thes For readers of Atul Gawande and Jerome Groopman, a book of beautifully crafted stories about what life is like for pa...

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Title:You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between
Author:Daniela Lamas
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:0316393177
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:256 pages pages

You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between Reviews

  • Stella Fouts
    Jul 05, 2018
    Interesting, but that's about the best comment I can make. I was taken aback by the fact that the author crossed the line (and she admitted it) when she accepted a patient's friend request on Facebook. But I was left with a bitter taste in my mouth after reading that she visited his pa...
  • Rosanne
    Apr 15, 2018
    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a hea...
  • Kirsti
    Jul 24, 2018
    Shortly after I started this book, I felt as if I were falling into it. I got completely caught up in the author's world, even though I am not a doctor or a transplant patient. I knew that sometimes people experience delirium while in a hospital, but I didn't know that people can have ...
  • Jill
    Aug 12, 2018
    These stories were directly relevant to my work on a hospital oncology floor, and reminded me of many ethically murky cases we've had. It was helpful to read about Lamas' reflections to help me process my own. At the same time, I was disappointed that sometimes it seemed she repeated h...
  • Sara
    Mar 03, 2018
    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you wit...
  • Petra X
    Jul 25, 2018
    Why, "You can stop humming now"? Humming increases the pressure in the chest. The author was about to pull out an intravenous line and before she would be able to cover the little hole with a dressing an air bubble might enter the patient's body, travel to his heart and kill him! So sh...
  • Emily
    May 17, 2018
    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, du...
  • Victoria Murata
    Jul 11, 2018
    Lamas is a pulmonary and critical care doctor in Boston. She begins her narrative ten years ago when she was a resident, and she describes cases that have obviously stuck with her over the years because of their complexity, or because the patient and the patient's family are memorable....
  • Donna
    May 15, 2018
    The author writes of maybe 10 patients she encountered with diagnoses that would have killed them a generation ago. The march of medical science changed that ? and that was the point of the book she wanted to write. None of the patients are in this fix from bad lifestyle choices. So ...
  • Marie (UK)
    May 03, 2018
    I have mixed feelings about this book. As an Ex critical care nurse (UK) I can read and understand the case histories provided. The US is, I feel, more proactive in moving patients with invasive therapies on. I haven't worked with ECMO patients but the idea of mobilising them seems ali...
  • Elizabeth
    Jun 14, 2018
    This book helped me realize that "advances" in medicine may not always prove beneficial or healthy for chronically ill people and their families. The stories and experiences shared were insightful. I applaud Dr. Lamas for taking the time and initiative to get to know patients and their...
  • Meg
    Apr 01, 2018
    As the patient with CF, I loved how she brought to life many of my experiences. She clearly captured all the joy, struggles, and fun in my life. I am grateful to be part of this book, and sincerely appreciate all the work she has done to bring awareness to Cystic Fibrosis. ...
  • Julie
    May 17, 2018
    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their l...
  • Jackie
    May 18, 2018
    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of ...
  • Elizabeth Vazquez
    May 07, 2018
    I read books about dying and death and medicine because I want to able to make informed decisions for my loved ones. This book discussed the medical devices that are able to keep very ill people alive longer and the difficult decisions that people face when they choose to take advantag...
  • Mary
    May 01, 2018
    I enjoy reading books on medicine and I enjoyed this quite a lot. Lamas admits that she doesn't much about what happens when a critical care patient goes home, and I think that's probably true for most physicians. In fact, I'm sad to say that most probably don't know and don't even...
  • Susannah
    Mar 22, 2018
    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician?s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading. ...
  • Eleanor
    Jul 24, 2018
    Maybe it's me. I stopped reading this book about 2 anecdotes in. It's like romance/suspense books--so few authors do it as well as Mary Stewart, that they're just not worth reading. Having inhaled (over and over) Oliver Sacks' and Atul Gawande's books, this one is just.not.there. IMO, ...
  • Mmfniteowl
    Jun 15, 2018
    Not only a gifted writer but a gifted physician with compassion for her patients. She opens the question- what happens to the chronic illness patient after lifesaving efforts have enabled them to live. Is it always in the best interest of the patient and family to save someone and then...
  • John
    Apr 04, 2018
    A bunch of disjoint stories. For Atul Gawande having endorsed the book, I had higher expectations from the writing style. I felt that it was too dry... to clinical... too disconnected. #1, #2 and #9 drew me and tried to establish a connection between me, a reader, and patients and...
  • DW
    Aug 03, 2018
    This book reminded me of This Won't Hurt a Bit: (And Other White Lies): My Education in Medicine and Motherhood, but I liked this book much better. This Won't Hurt a Bit seemed to chronicle the author's slide from really caring about her patients to a scene that I can't get out of my h...
  • Neil
    Jun 15, 2018
    I received a free copy via Netgalley in exchange for a honest review. An Emotional and sometimes upsetting insight into critical care for patients. A riveting read throughout. ...
  • Anna
    May 15, 2018
    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life. ...
  • Joanne Mcleod
    Apr 25, 2018
    As a physician, who also aspires to be a writer, this book is well written and very inspiring. As Daniela notes in the acknowledgements, ?The path to becoming a doctor is relatively clear; the path to becoming a writer, less so.? She seems to be laying down a very clear path to fol...
  • Ellen Pilch
    May 29, 2018
    Despite the sad topic, I truly enjoyed this book. The author writes about when she was in medical school and making the rounds in the ICU. At one point, she accepts a FB friend request from a critically ill patient close to her in age. It is so she can see the photos of places he trave...
  • Barbara Tarnay
    Apr 16, 2018
    I really enjoyed this book. The stories themselves were actually a bit on the depressing side, but I think the author has done an excellent job of portraying the not happily ever after ending most of us see in up lifting news stories. If you are fortunate enough to have little experien...
  • Kind  Konfetti
    Feb 26, 2018
    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas wri...
  • Kathy H
    Jun 25, 2018
    This book was well written and opened my eyes fully to the horror of palliative care and what that really means. My takeaway is that there are lots of things worse than dying. I left it depressed and desperately afraid of head injuries. Our medical situation in America doesn't even wor...
  • Emelia LaFortune
    Jun 04, 2018
    I really enjoyed reading this book. I appreciated the cute title that references how we ask patients to hum as we pull their central lines. I feel like I could have met so many of these patients throughout my time in the ICU, but I don?t have the opportunity to see how most of them d...
  • Michelle B
    Mar 07, 2018
    I love reading about the work that medical doctors do and I hold good medical doctors in very high esteem. Daniela Lamas is one of those doctors and deserves recognition for the great work she does with a professional and yet compassion approach. She is a doctor who works in critical c...