The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South

The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South

A people's history of Southern food that reveals how the region came to be at the forefront of American culinary culture and how issues of race have shaped Southern cuisine over the last six decades THE POTLIKKER PAPERS tells the story of food and politics in the South over the last half century. Beginning with the pivotal role of cooks in the Civil Rights movement, noted a A people's history of Southern food that reveals how the region came to be at the forefront of American culinary cult...

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Title:The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South
Author:John T. Edge
Rating:
Genres:Food and Drink
ISBN:1524736198
Format Type:Audio CD

The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South Reviews

  • Joe
    Dec 05, 2017
    The biggest problem with this book is that its not what it claims to be. This may seem like a distinction without a difference, but it is not a "food history of the modern South". It's more of "a collection of essays on popular food fads and chefs in the South, arranged in chronologica...
  • Carolyn Fitzpatrick
    Aug 07, 2017
    A must read if you are interested in important chefs, restaurants, and food trends in the culinary history of the South. I actually preferred the first section, which covered the 1950s and 1960s. It talks about how home cooking fueled the Civil Rights Movement, while segregated restaur...
  • Darcie
    Jan 18, 2018
    Interesting topic (I'm a recent fan of potlikker and collard greens, not having grown up with either) but this book is hard to follow. ...
  • Jessica
    Jan 18, 2018
    I wasn't sure what to expect with this book, but I LOVED it. As Edge describes "potlikker" was the broth left after a pot of greens was cooked - the slave owners ate the greens, leaving the potlikker for the slaves - not knowing the potlikker was nutrient rich and the better product. T...
  • Frances Dowell
    Jul 06, 2017
    (3.75 stars) The Potlikker Papers is largely about the politics of food?who eats high on the hog, who eats low on the hog, who owns the hog and how that hog was raised. The first 180 pages alone are worth the price of admission, and I hope they spark a renewed interest in Civil Ri...
  • Jenny
    Jun 20, 2017
    I really enjoyed this historical take on Southern foodways which started with a discussion of race relations and the Civil Rights movement and ended with a description of the international melting pot of the modern South as reflected in its cuisine. This is truly a people's history tol...
  • Mike
    Jun 12, 2017
    Really good book. A look at the last 50 years of southern food and eating habits and how changes in those things also reflect the way our region has changed. From the African American women who fed the civil rights movement to Colonel Sanders who made traditional food into fast food to...
  • Amber
    Jan 29, 2018
    Just like the flavors and textures of southern cooking are layered so is the history and breadth of the peoples who created this regional fare. Many food and historical movements such as vegetarian cookery, slow food and civil rights arose from the south. Hippies who settled communes a...
  • Matt
    Jul 08, 2017
    If you want to understand the south, you have to understand the effect food has on the south. I think John T. Edge is as good as anyone at conveying not only the culture of the south, but the important role food plays in southern culture. Overall, I think this is a great book. It reall...
  • Gina
    Jan 25, 2018
    It isn't that The Potlikker Papers is a bad book, but it also isn't a "Food History of the Modern South." It is a social, cultural, and political commentary onto which a few food trends and fads are loosely tied. That isn't a bad thing, necessarily. In truth, I found it well written wi...
  • Kate
    Nov 23, 2017
    The first half of this book was amazing. Tracing the food history of the southern United States, Edge uses food to examine much deeper societal themes - slavery, racism, segregation, and poverty - while revealing the trends which seem so new and hip today (eating organically, eating lo...
  • Fredrick Danysh
    Apr 02, 2017
    A semi-academic history of the Southern food culture. Many Southern chefs are profiled by there are no examples of recipes of the food of the South. Overall, the work provides some interesting views and would be good for anyone interested in the background of regional cooking. This was...
  • Kayle Barnes
    Sep 03, 2017
    Maybe it's because in 2017 it feels like understanding the South is key to understanding America, or because I grapple with the meaning of being black and woman and Southern and choosing to (mostly identify as the latter), or the fact that like jazz, I think Southern food is America's ...
  • Cindy Grossi
    Jul 19, 2017
    Disappointing, yet surprising. I thought this book would be more about food, but found it a social commentary on the south and its history with food woven in. I have a deep interest in southern history, especially from the Civil Rights period, so there was that. I found Edge's writin...
  • Jake
    Sep 19, 2017
    Southern food is more than just collard greens and fried chicken. From slaves in the Antebellum era who drank the broth from pots of greens to Indian immigrants who make curry with okra, this book tells the story of how the South developed its own unique cuisine as diverse as the peopl...
  • Emily
    Nov 01, 2017
    Stopped reading because I had to return it to the library, but I probably won't borrow it again to finish it. I learned some interesting things, but on the whole this book reads like there's just too much to write and not enough space to write it in, which leaves it feeling dry and lik...
  • Phoebe
    Jun 05, 2017
    2.5 stars. I feel guilty for settling on a rough, ungenerous rating for this book, because I did like it for many of its qualities. Solid, thorough history; documented research interspersed with personal interviews; a discussion of race, socioeconomics, immigration, etc; and overall a ...
  • Phil
    Nov 17, 2017
    A very well written and engaging history of not only the food of the historic and modern south but also how slavery and civil rights are tied seamlessly with that food. The book starts with the description of the work environment for blacks in the early 20th century up to mid-centur...
  • Kelsey Shankle
    Mar 19, 2018
    Potlikker Papers is one of my favorite recent reads, especially in the non-fiction category. As a lover of food and history, this book takes an intriguing overview of not only the foods of the south, but its peoples. The honesty is refreshing, discussing certain foods' origins in sl...
  • Jesse
    Oct 09, 2017
    The first thing I ever read by Southern food scholar John T. Edge. A terrific work of non-fiction, chronicling the development of modern Southern cuisine from the civil rights movement to the present day. Food is inexorably linked with culture, and so is politics, and so is race, so by...
  • William Burruss
    Sep 09, 2017
    When someone looks at me I?m 100% white, but when I eat I am Soul Black, a mix of grits and cous-sous, Indian and American Indian. My enjoyment of food takes me to seafood and barbecue shacks, and to five star restaurants. What I like about this book is that I am living the New South...
  • Laura Bates
    Mar 31, 2018
    I would really give this book a 3.5 rating because parts of the book warrant only a 3. It's really 2 books, one that is focused and very informative and rates a 4. This is especially true of earlier sections in which he discusses the history of food in the civil rights era, up through ...
  • Dale Cousins
    Jul 21, 2017
    More of a social history spiced with food than a book on food illustrated by social history, I enjoyed the commentary of how Southern food had evolved in multiple directions over time. Be it New Orleans or Charleston or BBQ or Creole or Low Country, the cooks of the South have adapted ...
  • Greg Brozeit
    Sep 13, 2017
    Yesterday, the individual who occupies the American presidency referred to the nations of Africa, Central America and Haiti as "shitholes." A few things related to The Potlikker Papers came to mind as I considered the stupidity of the racist who now is responsible for leading this nati...
  • Sarah D'Amato
    Aug 05, 2017
    This book should be required reading for any hipster foodie who pays more than $3 for a BBQ pork sandwich from a food truck, drinks moonshine only in a cocktail served in a gentrified downtown bar, or who takes their other foodie friends to Bojangles as a destination but who otherwise ...
  • Elliot Williams
    Mar 22, 2018
    There is so much to like in this book. The first sections, particularly the chapters about the civil rights movement and the War on Poverty, are excellent and made me re-think stories I thought I knew. The book loses its way for me in the 1980s and 90s - too many brief introductions to...
  • Jamie
    Mar 04, 2018
    I REALLY enjoyed this book - a survey of Southern food from slavery to immigration. I was completely sucked into the stories, seeing how each successive generation took foods of the past and reinterpreted them, and even by more modern stories where immigrants from nations across the gl...
  • Richard
    Aug 30, 2017
    As far as I know, this is the first book proposing (much less exploring) links between Southern food, Southern culture, and Southern (and National) politics. John T. Edge set out on an ambitious task, obviously, and while not exhaustive, this is an excellent first exploration on the to...
  • Candice M.
    Jul 05, 2017
    While I was disappointed that the book was less about the history of Southern food--how it arrived; where it came from; who, when where it was developed; and the direction it was taking now--the rating is a reflection of how little I got out of the book. Mr. Edge's book is an ambitious...
  • Jessica.Ibrahim
    Apr 01, 2018
    This book was incredibly unenjoyable to read. Although I was initially intrigued and continued to love this narrative perspective of the South's identity through time as I was reading it, I wished that it was written in a different, more pleasing way instead of bogged down paragraphs. ...