The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World

The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World

Between 1846 and 1940, more than 50 million Europeans moved to the Americas in one of the largest migrations of human history, emptying out villages and irrevocably changing both their new homes and the ones they left behind. With a keen historical perspective on the most consequential social phenomenon of the twentieth century, Tara Zahra shows how the policies that gave Between 1846 and 1940, more than 50 million Europeans moved to the Americas in one of the largest migrations of human hist...

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Title:The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World
Author:Tara Zahra
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:0393353729
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:416 pages pages

The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World Reviews

  • Judy
    Apr 29, 2018
    I chose to read this book because of my interest in genealogy. All four of my grandparents emigrated from Slovakia. It's scope was much greater, addressing the causes of migration through WW II and the opening of the communist East to today's resurgent nationalism and accompanying xeno...
  • Nicole
    Jul 22, 2016
    My official review will be appearing in the Austrian Studies Newsletter. ...
  • Philip
    Feb 01, 2017
    This book is a comprehensive look at emigration from Central Europe for the past century and a half. It is broader than most in that it deals with the fate of the immigrants and those who returned as well. In addition it deals with the policies of the sending nation and their attitudes...
  • James Klagge
    Aug 31, 2016
    This book covers my own family history, since all 8 of my great-grandparents came from East Central Europe in the late 19th Century. One topic that I hadn't thought of was the effect of immigration on the villages that were left behind. After WWI when Czechoslovakia became its own coun...
  • Susan
    Jul 11, 2018
    This book, covering immigration from the 1850s to the present, puts a great deal into perspective about what we are seeing today. You also realize how much governments throughout this 175 years have manipulated people. There is so much politics involved and our own countries policies h...
  • Wendy
    Nov 29, 2018
    This book was interesting but was so detailed it kind of got bogged down. ...
  • Laura Chase
    May 11, 2016
    Dry reading in parts, Interesting look at who was migrating and to where. ...
  • Maureen
    May 23, 2018
    I wrote my bachelor?s thesis on emigration from Europe in the nineteenth century. So I had some background knowledge coming into this book. But that wasn?t enough to fuel me through this long haul through unpleasant episodes of history This book starts late in the 19th century ...
  • Darya
    Jan 12, 2018
    An overview of migration from Eastern Europe since the late 19th century. + Many separate facts of interest, and interesting parallels between policies and attitudes in different epochs, which are usually treated or perceived separately. - You can't guess from the introduction what w...
  • Ann
    Dec 31, 2018
    ...
  • Fredrick Danysh
    Jul 23, 2018
    From 1846 to 1940 there was massive legal immigration [they followed the rules that were in place] from European counties to the Americas [predominately to the United States]. The author attempts to look at the causes and procedures. She also examines returnees to Europe. Additionally ...
  • Karen
    Sep 07, 2017
    Maybe a little ponderous as an audio book, but a very interesting vein of history that I never though much about: the result of emigration on the countries from which people originated and the politics and sociology of the effect of emigration on those countries. ...
  • Shalom
    Dec 19, 2016
    The Great Departure focuses on the other side of many well-known stories. The massive waves of immigration that shaped America's identity often originated in Eastern Europe. Tara Zahra elegantly portrays the individual desires, social forces, and web of political entanglements in Easte...
  • Jackie Jacobsen-Côté
    Jul 04, 2016
    I'm shocked at how quickly I sped through this book - but I think it's because migration is so important to me. Learned so much - about Austrian history, about how immigration/migration/emigration policies in Eastern Europe set the stage for Nazi policies, and how migration policies an...
  • Patricia Swenson
    May 04, 2016
    I started reading this book to perhaps gain more insight into what my father might have experienced when he came to the United States back in 1923 from Eastern Europe. I found the early chapters more interesting than the last ones which dealt more with the 1930's to more current times....
  • Joan
    May 05, 2018
    I think I was looking for something different from this book, perhaps a story of hope? If that is what you hope to find here, don't read this account of the mass migration of people, primarily from Eastern Europe, to the United States and other countries. You will be thoroughly depress...
  • Paulo A. Reimann
    Jul 09, 2018
    Definitely I didn't like it. I guess the 3 stars was a good day. For me, there is nothing new. The book doesn't bring any novelty or break through. ...
  • Scott Lord
    Mar 08, 2017
    This book provides a lot of insight into the immigration trends over the last 150 years focusing on Eastern Europe emigration to the west. Who is allowed into your country has been a debate for decades. I was unaware that Reagan wouldn't deport Poles who were in the U.S. illegally or t...
  • Jill Meyer
    Apr 29, 2016
    When Americans think about migration from eastern Europe, I think we concentrate on the immigration of people from there to here. Millions of people left eastern European lands and moved to the United States in waves basically beginning in the 1840's. We know what they were looking for...
  • Jim Swike
    Aug 08, 2017
    Very well-done and well-researched. Provides the full story of Migration, I learned a lot about the topic. Makes a great reference book, enjoy! ...
  • Patricia
    May 11, 2016
    What drove our families to leave Eastern Europe? What did they go through to get her, to survive? This book answers so many of these question. ...
  • Pamela Baster
    Nov 22, 2018
    ...
  • Mike Niebrzydowski
    Nov 03, 2017
    I think that I was looking for something just a little bit different than what this ended up being. However it was still a good overview or insight into eastern European immigration history. A little bit more focus on the Jewish population than I expected, but I suppose that is a large...
  • Penny
    Apr 16, 2019
    ...
  • Dany Burns
    Dec 12, 2018
    I read this for a class I was taking about Eastern European history but I think this is a book that is very easy to read. I wasn't my favorite book in the world because Eastern European History is not my favorite history topic but if you do like that topic and you're interested in immi...
  • Katie  Hanna
    Apr 06, 2017
    Impressive work of transnational history. Highly recommended. [The following summary/review borrowed from my graduate school writing] Mass migration from Eastern Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries counts as one of the great population movements in world history. Ho...
  • Nator
    Mar 22, 2017
    Be cautious if attempting to use this book as a historical source, as Zahra seems to have valued telling a good story over any rigor or fidelity to events. She doesn't seem to have looked very closely at the things she cites; to pick an egregious example, she claims on page 280 that ov...
  • Esteban Fuentes Jarufe
    Oct 19, 2017
    ...
  • Laura N
    Nov 13, 2018
    Started off slow and kind of all over the place . It got much better half way through. ...
  • Corrine
    Apr 08, 2019
    Lots of history on ethnonationalism and the causes of its rising throughout history. That we look to blame others for their station in life instead of being curious and asking why. And it is happening again as the wealth gap widens we blame those we think we are better than instead of ...