The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason

The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason

In The End of Faith, Sam Harris delivers a startling analysis of the clash between reason and religion in the modern world. He offers a vivid, historical tour of our willingness to suspend reason in favor of religious beliefs?even when these beliefs inspire the worst human atrocities. While warning against the encroachment of organized religion into world politics, Harris In The End of Faith, Sam Harris delivers a startling analysis of the clash between reason and religion in the modern wor...

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Title:The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason
Author:Sam Harris
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Genres:Religion
ISBN:The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:348 pages pages

The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason Reviews

  • Steve
    Nov 24, 2007
    I wouldn't start here if I were beginning to explore atheism. The book is rather ponderous, but it's worth reading as you make your way through the literature of the field. In places, I found it a little hard to follow, in terms of the progression and linkage of his ideas. Many ind...
  • Noah Stacy
    May 08, 2007
    I am sympathetic, though perhaps not entirely convinced, of Harris's argument that faith--moderate or extreme--is always dangerous. However, religious beliefs should certainly be opened to criticism. As Harris suggests, religious beliefs should be made as open to criticism as any other...
  • Greg
    Oct 07, 2009
    What follows is not a review. It's more like some notes and thoughts I had while reading the book... a review will soon be written.... This is from DFW's 2005 Kenyon Commencement Speech: "Here's another didactic little story. There are these two guys sitting together in a bar i...
  • The Crimson Fucker
    Nov 01, 2007
    We are at war with Islam. Sam Harris. There are no atheists in foxholes. William J. Clear. Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum. Vegetius. Screw you guys I'm going home. Eric Cartman. ...
  • Pete
    Apr 15, 2007
    There are several currents running through The End of Faith, many of which I agree with enthusiastically, some of which I regard with caution, and one or two that I find so strange as to wonder whether Harris wrote the last few chapters while in too.. contemplative a state, as he might...
  • Rob
    Jun 06, 2007
    A greater mystery than human nature and its irrepressible theological imagination is how this book managed to impress so many people. After much consideration, I can only conclude its popularity (along with Daniel Dennett's Breaking the Spell, Richard Dawkin's The God Delusion, and Chr...
  • Matthew
    Jun 30, 2007
    So near the mark, but just off of center. This book makes many laudable points, not the least of which is the critique that allowing faith/religion into the political sphere on equal footing with science and reason will doom us all. My primary complaint with this work, and the reason I...
  • Trevor
    Dec 20, 2007
    Harris does much to prove that there is nothing one can say about religion that will not get you into trouble. In Letter to a Christian Nation he is criticised for not dealing with moderates, but that is done here. I find the religious tend to want it all ways. If you criticise those w...
  • Lena
    Jul 26, 2007
    In this book, Harris makes the compelling argument that human beings can no longer afford the luxury of major religious belief systems. In a world in which we now have the capacity to kill millions of humans at one time, belief systems that are intolerant of non-believers and emphasize...
  • C.
    Aug 01, 2007
    I was excited to read this book after seeing Sam Harris on the Colbert Report. It seemed like the Atheist argument that I had really been waiting for, and that finally I was going to find something that I wholeheartedly could get behind, without reservation. Well, if I could give th...
  • Books Ring Mah Bell
    Sep 29, 2010
    BRILLIANT. Simply Brilliant!!!! If you have a choice to read this or God is Not Great by Hitchens, do yourself a favor and read this. ...
  • John
    Nov 02, 2007
    At its heart, the book is arguing against Faith. His starting point is Islamic terrorism, which he argues can only be understood in the context of faith--without the religious beliefs underpinning these people's lives, without the certainty they have in both the righteousness of their ...
  • Eric
    Jan 03, 2008
    I've been reading this book forever now. I imagine I'll finish sometime. I'm sympathetic to Harris' arguments: I've been an atheist since I was a teenager. But Harris' book is hypocritical, shallow, and unpleasant. Religion is bad--unless it's his own brand of Buddhism, apparently. ...
  • Paul
    Jan 04, 2009
    Another yawner from the "New" atheists. This is another book by a pretentious atheist who just can't believe that there are still theists. "Arrrgh! Don't you know we've beaten you theists fair and square. It is just obvious that theism is false. If you won't give up your theistic belie...
  • Donald
    Jan 16, 2008
    I found Sam Harris's book interesting and disturbing, but it should be classified as fiction. Nearly every argument he asserts is specious. Apparently, he reads only those who support his own position (philosophical suicide). He conveniently dismisses atheistic regimes as "religious" b...
  • Jeanette  "Astute Crabbist"
    Jul 14, 2008
    The original purpose of the book,(as nearly as I can tell), was to show how all religions require belief in things that are basically insane, without providing one shred of evidence for these beliefs. He discusses various faiths: Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and shows how all of their sc...
  • R.A. Schneider
    Mar 05, 2008
    I rate this a five in spite of some legitimate reservations, too well expressed by too many people to bear repeating here. The things I liked: 1. Brilliant writing style. Incisive, funny, powerful. (His followup to this book, a 94 page tract called "Letter to a Christian Nation" ...
  • Jimmy
    Feb 13, 2009
    While religious belief is an incredibly complex subject with ages of history behind it, the motivation for such belief can be roughly summarized as a preoccupation with, and fear of, what happens to us when we, as mortal human beings, die. Let's face it, it is a frightening and dreary ...
  • Eric_W
    Jan 04, 2009
    Finally, the a-theist (hyphen deliberate) crowd is responding to all the religious claptrap with a vengeance. I've read Dawkins, Dennett and now Harris (I think this book should also be read with Letter to a Christian Nation which was his response to all the hate mail he received.) Har...
  • Eric_W
    Jan 06, 2009
    updated 4/12. It has always been clear to me that faith-based belief systems eliminate the possibility of conversation and the alternative to conversation is violence. For example, if you want to discuss a policy issue that relates to a faith-based belief, the dialogue ceases when one ...
  • Justin Evans
    Feb 16, 2012
    Yikes- this may actually be the worst book I've ever finished. It's not totally crap: he's got a perfect argument against people who think torture is somehow a transcendent evil, while backing war in general. But other than that, it's preaching to the choir of the worst kind. To take...
  • Ram
    Oct 31, 2017
    A book about the dangers of religion. In a well-reasoned way, Sam Harris explains why religion and tolerance to religion is harmful to mankind. The book starts with a description of the last day of a suicide bomber. Further in the first chapter he opposes respect and tolerance ...
  • Nebuchadnezzar
    Mar 15, 2012
    Harris can pen a clever turn of phrase. Unfortunately, that's most of what he has going for him. The old standby "What's good isn't new and what's new isn't good" very much applies here. It's funny how much Harris and I agree on the fundamental issues -- we are both atheists and we ...
  • Mike Puma
    Sep 13, 2010
    While covering much the same ground as Christopher Hitchens in God Is Not Great, Harris does so with a voice less harsh, one sounding less like a diatribe. He scope is wider than Hitchens allowing him to make points that Hitchens doesn?t as well, e.g. that the tolerant religious are ...
  • Kristina
    Sep 30, 2010
    2017 Review: I read Sam Harris?s The End of Faith: Religion, Terror and the Future of Reason probably 10 years ago and remember disagreeing with his views on Islam. I decided to read it again because my views have changed over the years and I wanted to reacquaint myself with this bo...
  • Jessaka
    Jul 12, 2018
    Sam Harris began his book with his rants about Christianity, nothing new, except to say that he is also against the Islamic religion and appears to think that all Muslims desire to kill us. For this, he uses their scripture to condemn them, but the Christian bible says the same things ...
  • Emma Sea
    Jun 20, 2016
    I absolutely reject Harris's key argument that Islam is essentially and inescapably a religion of violence and hate. That's like defining Christianity by the actions of the KKK. Given that, it's hard for me to do anything other than dislike the book, but I was equally disappointed in i...
  • Luffy
    Mar 24, 2015
    I'm going to be brief. The End of Faith by Sam Harris is a landmark book for me. It blew my mind when I first read it. Now, it doesn't feel as good as the short and sharp Letter To A Christian Nation, and has less great moments than the slow starting and uneven The Moral Landscape. The...
  • Shaun
    Sep 02, 2013
    I have been a fan of Harris and his ideas for quite some time. In addition to reading his book Free Will and subscribing to his blog, I have watched numerous interviews/talks/debates, and I am very familiar with his ideas/works. That said, I still found this to be a worthwhile inves...
  • Catalin Negru
    Dec 06, 2016
    Target audience: The book is addressed mainly to people interested in spirituality. About the author: Sam Harris was born in 1967 in Los Angeles to a Quaker father and a Jewish mother. However, he described his home as a secular one where religion was not discussed. He is an America...