Spiritual Friendship: Finding Love in the Church as a Celibate Gay Christian

Spiritual Friendship: Finding Love in the Church as a Celibate Gay Christian

Friendship is a relationship like no other. Unlike the relationships we are born into, we choose our friends. It is also tenuous?we can end a friendship at any time. But should friendship be so free and unconstrained? Although our culture tends to pay more attention to romantic love, marriage, family, and other forms of community, friendship is a genuine love in its own ri Friendship is a relationship like no other. Unlike the relationships we are born into, we choose our friends. It is als...

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Title:Spiritual Friendship: Finding Love in the Church as a Celibate Gay Christian
Author:Wesley Hill
Rating:
Genres:Christian
ISBN:1587433494
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:160 pages pages

Spiritual Friendship: Finding Love in the Church as a Celibate Gay Christian Reviews

  • Katherine Pershey
    Apr 23, 2016
    I heard so many rave reviews of Wesley Hill's presentations at the Festival of Faith and Writing I decided to go ahead and read this book that, on first glance, doesn't seem like something I would pick up. I'm part of a Christian tradition that affirms same sex marriage, so Hill's comm...
  • Mindelynn
    Jun 28, 2015
    One can debate Wesley's perspective on LGBT issues, however this excursus on the theology of friendship highlights the importance of this topic in Scripture. Hopefully his perspective can bring a welcome revisiting of this spiritual discipline to the American evangelical community that...
  • James
    May 19, 2015
    Wesley Hill self identifies as a gay, celibate Christian. That is, he is same-sex attracted but his theological convictions preclude him from joining in a romantic, sexual partnership with another man. His early book, Washed and Waiting (Zondervan, 2010) tells of his journey of seeking...
  • Douglas Wilson
    Jun 02, 2018
    Really sad. Wesley Hill is drowning in a sea of false assumptions. ...
  • Adam Shields
    Apr 15, 2015
    Short Review: This is a good followup and I think natural next step after Hill's first book. I think he is largely right that we need deep friendships and that the church should be facilitating and encouraging deep friendships. This is memoir-ish look at friendship because this is larg...
  • Jerry
    Dec 13, 2018
    Wesley thinks physical homosexual acts are sinful, but everything that leads up to those acts are assumed, endorsed, embraced, and insisted on in this book. What's just as appalling is the lack of love and courage of those around him to tell him the truth. This truth would be the thing...
  • Laura
    Apr 14, 2015
    This was just as great as I hoped it would be. Smart and informative but also personal, theoretical as well as practical. I love the implications of Hill's ideas for the church as a whole, for gay Christians choosing to be celibate, and for me as a single person. Some quotes I really l...
  • Sara
    May 16, 2018
    I applaud any book that challenges our culture's narrative about the supreme importance of sexual identity and expression. I deeply appreciated Wesley Hill's first book, Washed and Waiting, which is about his process of realizing he's gay as an adolescent and growing into an understand...
  • Joseph Sverker
    May 28, 2015
    This book is quite brilliant I have to say and very challenging in terms of what friendship is from a Christian perspective. I would say that Hill provides a vision for the church that really would make a difference in today's society. This goes for whoever you are. As he points out, t...
  • Alex Stroshine
    Mar 06, 2015
    I am coming to dislike the twenties. One of the main reasons for this is that friendships seem so fluid; they fluctuate as friends enter different stages of life. Some of us enter careers, some remain in school. Some enter relationships or get married while others remain single. Some m...
  • Bob
    Jun 03, 2015
    Spiritual Friendship by Wesley Hill. Grand Rapids: Brazos Press, 2015. Summary: This is an exploration of the place of friendship in the life of the Christian, particularly its importance for those who chose, either because of sexual orientation, or other reasons to live celibate, c...
  • Jordan J. Andlovec
    Aug 03, 2017
    I don't know if I have been as encouraged by a book in the last few years as I have with this one. As a straight, single man in his thirties I have felt the pangs of loneliness and despondency (although not as thoroughly as the author has), and this book validated my feeling that frien...
  • John Lussier
    May 04, 2015
    Hill's work is a reflection on his life and friendship. He asks, as a gay celibate man what the role of friendship can be for him. As a Christian he considers whether the Church has a place for committed loving friendships. Yes, it does. There is a historical precedent for these types ...
  • John
    Feb 01, 2018
    I have so much respect for Wesley Hill. I see this book as beginning a conversation on friendships rather than practical how to. ...
  • Stephen
    Apr 12, 2015
    We had a saying about family when I was growing up: ?You can pick your friends, but you can?t pick your relatives.? While this saying is meant to indicate the value and permanence of family, it also captures our culture?s understanding of friendship. Friendship is the freest of...
  • Chad
    Mar 19, 2018
    I found this book when a friend of mine joined Goodreads, and he began uploading all the titles he has already read. There are plenty of people out there who think gay Christians should leave what they consider a hateful sect or find a denomination that is more welcoming. On the conser...
  • Mediaman
    Feb 16, 2019
    This weak, thin book is a very inadequate discussion of what could be a substantive topic. However, Wesley Hill seems to have tossed it together with random thoughts and lack of order, never truly dealing with the subject until he gives a few simplistic practical tips in the final chap...
  • Stephanie Lobdell
    Feb 27, 2019
    I gave this a 4 star only because I wanted more. Like his first work, Washed and Waiting, this book heavily leans toward memoir. I appreciate that and it evokes empathy and a desire to listen and learn better tan any sermon, but as a pastor, I as hoping for more in terms of how to fost...
  • Ivan
    Jul 09, 2015
    Beautifully written, poignant and honest. But the view of "wedded friendship" (or vowed friendship), particularly in this context of same-sex attraction, I think muddies the waters at best and opens up temptation at worst (esp. if it's two friends with SSA). ...
  • Molly Bosscher
    May 14, 2016
    As a single person, I'm interested in friendship and it's not just my single status that makes the idea of friendship compelling. Hill does some good theological work to elevate friendship beyond it usual place in our world (way way below marriage) but ultimately his experiences in the...
  • Chris Woznicki
    Apr 27, 2015
    An eclipse of friendship. That is what author, theologian, and gay Christian Wesley Hill says has happened to friendship in our modern era. ?Friendship is the freest, the least constrained, the least fixed and determined, of all human loves.? (xiii) You can never stop being a paren...
  • Kevin Figgins
    Mar 08, 2017
    One of the most vulnerable writers I have ever read that I feel like I can call him by his first name. Wesley writes on a particular topic (through very personal experiences) that we probably think we have a grasp on but really don't. This book will help you tremendously to see the i...
  • Thomas Achord
    Jun 25, 2018
    Hill takes the experiences of marriage and places them under the genus of friendship. Thus, everything in the one, sans sex, can be experienced in the other. Such is ?spiritual friendship.? As another has pointed out, this is a play on courtly love: From DW: ?That medieval...
  • Andrew Thornton
    Jun 19, 2015
    In a day where homosexuality and the church is center stage, where everyone has a passionate, yet often underdeveloped, opinion this book is critical. If some believe that God has called SSA brothers and sisters to resist romantic relationship then, as the church we are called to under...
  • Eilidh
    Mar 19, 2018
    I have a lot of thoughts about this book. Not quite a treatise for friendship, and not quite a personal reflection, it was difficult to know how to read - at times it seemed like a memoir, at times a discursive essay... I appreciate what Wesley Hill is trying to do with this volume: en...
  • Teri Pardue
    Aug 01, 2018
    Wesley Hill is one of the most honest, transparent authors I have ever read. He bears his soul with such raw emotion, that I came away from both this book and his book Washed and Waiting longing to sit down to dinner with him as with a friend. And yet, Hill manages to write about the t...
  • Morgan Joyner
    May 22, 2019
    I will be recommending Spiritual Friendship to everyone I meet, whether they're married or single or something in between. His message is so, so important, and his prose just so happens to be lovely and easy on the eyes, even for someone like me who struggles with nonfiction. Where...
  • Clifton Hickman
    Apr 08, 2016
    My favorite book I have read this year as Wesley seeks to reorient the power of deep Christian friendship. If marriage is the highest form of relationship that trumps all others, then married people can say that they experience the greatest degree of commitment, friendship, endurance, ...
  • Anita Yoder
    Jul 08, 2018
    Beautifully written, both scholarly and personal, Hill addresses the existential loneliness of the human experience. Everyone, I think, is this lonely but few are this honest about it. And Hill and his gay friends live with a deeper level of loneliness because while I'm celebate now bu...
  • Elisa
    Aug 21, 2018
    Short and sweet. Hill's discussion on friendship aptly articulates the feelings of many queer Christians wrestling with the question of celibacy, as well as the feelings of many others in this society that undervalues friendship. His historical contextualization is very insightful and ...