The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America

Erik Larson's gifts as a storyteller are magnificently displayed in this rich narrative of the master builder, the killer, and the great fair that obsessed them both. Two men, each handsome and unusually adept at his chosen work, embodied an element of the great dynamic that characterized America's rush toward the twentieth century. The architect was Daniel Hudson Burnham, Erik Larson's gifts as a storyteller are magnificently displayed in this rich narrative of the master builder, the kil...

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Title:The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America
Author:Erik Larson
Rating:
Genres:Nonfiction
ISBN:The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Audio Cassette
Number of Pages:447 pages pages

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America Reviews

  • Madeline
    Jun 12, 2013
    Poor Erik Larson. He wanted to write an extensive, in-depth look at the 1893 World's Fair, which was a collaboration of some of the greatest creative minds in the country (including the guy who designed the Flatiron building in New York and Walt Disney's dad) and gave us, among othe...
  • Seth T.
    Sep 11, 2008
    Humour me and please allow the channeling an eighth grader for just a moment. OMG Squeee!!1 Teh best!! (Would an eighth grader say "teh best"?) And now we return you to our regularly scheduled review. I'm not a huge fan of non-fiction. Scratch that. I'm a huge fan of non-fiction, bu...
  • Danielle
    Aug 26, 2008
    So, no offense to those that liked this book, but I'm throwing in the towel after 75 pages. It's just not holding my interest. Part of the reason for this is that Larson's writing style is way too speculative for my taste in non-fiction. I just finished reading the Path Between Seas b...
  • James
    Apr 02, 2008
    Heard the one about the architect and the serial killer? It's not a bad joke, but it is a great book. The architect was Daniel Burnham, the driving force behind the Chicago World's Fair of 1893; the killer was H.H. Holmes, a Svengali-type figure who lured young women to his hotel and d...
  • Lobstergirl
    Jun 02, 2010
    Larson could be the worst nonfiction writer working in America today. When he notes that "[Frederick Law] Olmsted was no literary stylist. Sentences wandered through the report like morning glory through the pickets of a fence" he might as well be describing himself. It's painful to ma...
  • Jason
    Jul 28, 2011
    This book is two, two, two books in one! Sorry, that was annoying. But it?s almost as if Erik Larson wrote two really short books?one about the 1893 World?s Columbian Exposition and another about the murder spree of Dr. H. H. Holmes?and then shoved them together to create a ...
  • Henry Avila
    Mar 25, 2016
    The White City rises above the lake, like a fantasy from another time that never existed, but the eyes do not deceive, this image is real, bright lights glow at night, millions of respectful , quiet , mesmerized people look and walk by, the moon shines and reflects on the gigantic whit...
  • Jim Fonseca
    Feb 07, 2016
    A fascinating book and an easy read. Chapter by chapter, in simple chronological order, the author juxtaposes preparations for the 1893 Chicago World?s Fair with the doings of one of the country?s first serial murders. From the Fair?s chapters we learned how Chicago?s boost...
  • David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party
    Feb 12, 2017
    For me, reviewing this book is similar to trying to review any Nicolas Cage movie from the past 20 years, in that if I was asked if Cage's over-the-top performance was the best thing or the worst thing about the movie, I could only answer... "Yes!" (Pictured - one of Nicolas Cage'...
  • Jonathan Ashleigh
    Nov 10, 2015
    I was genuinely excited to get back into this story every time I picked it up. At times, this jumble of factual events felt like a tale I would contrive while wandering aimlessly around Wikipedia (even though Erik Larson says he did not get information from the internet because, appare...