Why We Lost: A General's Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars

Why We Lost: A General's Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars

A high-ranking general?s gripping insider account of the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and how it all went wrong. Over a thirty-five-year career, Daniel Bolger rose through the army infantry to become a three-star general, commanding in both theaters of the U.S. campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan. He participated in meetings with top-level military and civilian players, A high-ranking general?s gripping insider account of the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and how it all went w...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Why We Lost: A General's Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars
Author:Daniel P. Bolger
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:0544370481
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:544 pages pages

Why We Lost: A General's Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars Reviews

  • William
    Dec 12, 2014
    Books on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are "works in progress". So many have come out over the past decade, each filling in until a real history can be written to sum up the entire ordeal. Daniel P. Bolger took a step in that direction in his "Why We Lost". A former lieutenant-g...
  • Jack
    Feb 13, 2017
    An overview from the First Gulf War to the Second with Afghanistan to boot. I found myself recognizing many of the names and the places, especially those around the Fallujah and Ramadi areas circa 2006-2007. Recognition made this subject even more interesting on my part. The author...
  • Jessica Scott
    Nov 12, 2014
    Highly recommend this book to take a long look back at where we've been. Things that went right and things that went wrong. Had a few laughs along the way. Bolger has an approachable style and a clear knack for using storytelling to talk about a subject that matters. ...
  • Hartungt
    Mar 18, 2017
    For military history buffs this is a must read. Bolger doesn?t deliver an enumerated post-mortem dryly recounting the myriad mistakes made in the pursuit of Al Qaeda in Afghanistan and Iraq. Rather, he embeds reams of facts within the framework of war stories that emphasize the indiv...
  • Corey
    Jan 09, 2015
    I'm guessing the title was chosen by the publisher to sell books. Ignoring that, I was impressed. I have been picking up pieces of news stories over the past 12 plus years, but reading this I realized how little I really knew about the fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq, embarrising real...
  • Scott Rhee
    Oct 12, 2016
    Daniel P. Bolger is a retired Army lieutenant general. He has served for thirty-five years in the U.S. military with distinction, having served in positions of command in both Iraq and Afghanistan. He is a history professor at West Point. If anyone could articulate the reasons why we f...
  • Dachokie
    Sep 25, 2014
    Best Examination/Explanation of Iraq and Afghanistan Conflicts to Date ? This book was reviewed as part of Amazon's Vine program which included a free advance copy of the book. For a decade, the media has beaten the dead horses known as Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom to inf...
  • Rick
    Dec 11, 2014
    ?Why We Lost: A General?s Inside Account of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars? by Daniel P. Bolger (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Eamon Dolan Books, 2014) was a fine narrative of the American experience in Iraq and Afghanistan, but the title was more provocative than the telling. Thre...
  • Scott Haraburda
    Oct 25, 2014
    Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ Why We Lost is a book that was supposed to answer why we lost the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. But, I found its arguments lacking sufficient grounds to suggest an accurate reason this loss. By the w...
  • Doug
    Mar 27, 2015
    You might think this is a clearheaded assessment of how the civilian leaders and military managed to screw the pooch beyond all imagination, but you'd have been fooled by the blunt title. Considering the author was in a position to know where the blame lay, he mostly shrugs his shoulde...
  • Danny Reid
    Sep 07, 2017
    Both sobering and a bit of a disappointment, Bolger spends most of the book drawing attention to firefights and battles that were often shunted to the back pages of the newspaper in the US. While this is illustrative of what kind of wars America faced, it shows the author as being kind...
  • E.
    Feb 25, 2018
    At first I was a bit hesitant about picking up this book, essentially an inside baseball account of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan from a retired three-star general, LTG Daniel Bolger. I was concerned that I would either get one of two opinions: 1) a retired general that got passed o...
  • Bob H
    Nov 03, 2014
    This is a candid, heartfelt and perceptive a look at the US-led campaigns, 2001-2014, in Afghanistan and Iraq. It's not a spoiler to say that Gen. Bolger spells out how the two campaigns came to muddled ends. While his book doesn't have a fall-of-Saigon ending - and this book published...
  • James
    Dec 15, 2014
    LTG Bolger's review of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is disappointing. The title is a bait and switch--promising an examination of the strategic failures of these two wars but offering largely anecdotes of ground-level combat. The stories of the battles are told in greater depth and...
  • Clarke Wood
    Dec 23, 2014
    This book started out with the intriguing statement that the author, a retired general, lost the war on terrorism, and his intent in writing the book is to explain the failures of America's military leadership, though he does admit that political leadership does deserve some of the bla...
  • Adil Ehsan
    Feb 19, 2017
    An interesting and well written book but ultimately frustrating as it never really answers its title question. The rest of the review does go into spoilers............. I have 2 big issues with the findings of the book; first is an offensive and repeated use of the word in...
  • Feng Ouyang
    Jan 01, 2019
    The topic is very interesting. I wanted to know what we can learn from the longest wars in US history. However, I stopped reading after the first chapter, because I don?t think this book provides an unbiased account. It reads more like a personal vent, which I am not interested in. ...
  • Jason Anthony
    Apr 28, 2015
    After considering two Iraq/Afghanistan novels among the best of the past few years (Redeployment; Billy Lynn's Long Half-Time Walk), I wanted to return back to a non-fiction telling of how the wars actually transpired. In this, the title made me think that General Bolger was going t...
  • Brandon
    Jan 16, 2017
    "Enemy advances, we retreat. Enemy halts, we harass. Enemy tires, we attack. Enemy retreats, we pursue.? Perhaps as a veteran of the Global War on Terror, I found this book to be more interesting than a person that has no affiliation with the war that seemingly is never going to e...
  • Lynn Wheeler
    Apr 22, 2015
    makes it sound like Iraq1 was ground war even tho it was only 100hrs (of the 42 days) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_War it does mention precision bombing ... but the GAO air campaign effectiveness study says that significant portion of Iraqi armor was destroyed by A10 30mm fire...
  • SpaceBear
    Jun 20, 2018
    Bolger's book is definitely an interesting one, even though the title is a bit misleading. This book is a blow-by-blow account of the American wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, providing interesting historical perspective from the moment of each invasion through the different strategies th...
  • Jim
    Dec 28, 2014
    I was disappointed by this book. It does live up to its title, "Why we Lost." In fact, except for about 4 or 5 pages in the Epilogue (last chapter of the book), the author, a retired army general, does not address the issue. The book is really a compilation of war stories taken from...
  • Wilkin Beall
    Apr 24, 2015
    I was hoping to come away with more understanding about who the enemy was. I think the disappointment that I did not is my chief complaint with this book. The author simply does not ask the right questions. It's really unclear if he has asked any questions at all. The book is mainly a ...
  • Marcus Fielding
    Jan 07, 2015
    Daniel Bolger?s Why We Lost starts off as a bracing confessional: ?I am a United States Army General, and I lost the Global War on Terrorism. It's like Alcoholics Anonymous. Step one is admitting you have a problem. Well, I have a problem. So do my peers. And thanks to our problem,...
  • Thomas D. Towle
    Jan 24, 2016
    An honest appraisal of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. A good read. Might be a little tedious for those not familiar with military operations. I enjoyed the detail of some of the individual engagements. ...
  • Richard Croner
    Aug 31, 2018
    I really can't add anything to the comments previously published. The book is well researched and well written. General Bolgers' perspective regarding the war(s) is insightful due to the first hand observations and his research but, definitely, influenced by personal opinion. It is def...
  • Maziar Minovi
    Aug 04, 2017
    Action scene should be left to the ghost of tom Clancy but insightful descriptions of the generals. Let's just say Petreaus will not be coming over for a beer... ...
  • Steve Kohn
    Feb 07, 2018
    I'm going back to the summarizing Epilogue to search again for a simple sentence or two explaining "why we lost." It didn't jump out at me the first time, and it didn't the second. Was it that our most senior officers set and executed bad strategy? Was it that the Iraqi and American po...
  • Cptmorgan03
    Jun 23, 2018
    Fun Read, Ultimately Unsatisfying. LTG Bolger successfully recounts over fifteen years of warfare against the back drop of the simple question of ?who were we fighting.? This question was used as a rhetorical tool as he skillfully moves the reader through the strategic, operati...
  • Sud666
    Jan 23, 2016
    What an interesting book. Having served a decade in the GWOT (Global War on Terror) both in Intelligence and Special Operations, this was a great opportunity to see the war from a big picture. Written by a 3-star General (Lt. General) it is a combination of history and political scienc...