Soul Made Flesh: The Discovery of the Brain--and How it Changed the World

Soul Made Flesh: The Discovery of the Brain--and How it Changed the World

In this unprecedented history of a scientific revolution, award-winning author and journalist Carl Zimmer tells the definitive story of the dawn of the age of the brain and modern consciousness. Told here for the first time, the dramatic tale of how the secrets of the brain were discovered in seventeenth-century England unfolds against a turbulent backdrop of civil war, th In this unprecedented history of a scientific revolution, award-winning author and journalist Carl Zimmer tells the defin...

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Title:Soul Made Flesh: The Discovery of the Brain--and How it Changed the World
Author:Carl Zimmer
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Genres:Science
ISBN:Soul Made Flesh: The Discovery of the Brain--and How it Changed the World
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:384 pages pages

Soul Made Flesh: The Discovery of the Brain--and How it Changed the World Reviews

  • Ann Michael
    Jul 31, 2017
    I learned as much about Restoration England as I did about Thomas Willis and the pre-Enlightenment discoveries that led to the science of neurology and the idea of psychology. Interesting read and well-written, though I felt some of the editorial decisions concerning the structure o...
  • Kelly
    Jun 02, 2008
    Engaging story of early alchemist-physicians who basically discovered the function of the brain and nervous system, thereby radically challenging prevailing views about the soul. In laying out how this all intersected with England's religious and political upheavals in the 1600's, Zimm...
  • John
    Mar 06, 2008
    ?Soul Made Flesh? by Carl Zimmer is a fascinating examination of the history of the discovery of the brain?s function as the center for rational thought. While 17th Century doctor Thomas Willis is at the heart of this story, it proves to be a much more expansive tale than that ju...
  • Valerie
    Jun 15, 2011
    Standing on the shoulders of giants, seems to be the only way science can work. Every new idea and path, produces information, even when proved wrong or false. Any curiosity explored, any question that begs an answer, can be steps towards a refined understanding. Besides making clea...
  • Richard Williams
    Jul 06, 2010
    the story of the scientific discoveries of how our brains work. i like the author's writing, i've read several of his books and keep an eye on his blog-the loom, he's an out spoken secularist and physicalist, which forms the philosophic point of the book. it's organization is 2-fol...
  • Lisa
    Jul 19, 2011
    A book about the discovery of the purpose of the brain as more than a pump for the humors or a mostly inanimate blob. While well researched, I felt it dragged on somewhat, and coming away from the book, I felt more educated about past methods of scientific inquiry than the specific stu...
  • Jonathan
    Apr 22, 2013
    I confess to a Physicist's bias as a general feature of my worldview, which, so as it pertains to "Soul Made Flesh: The Discovery of the Brain and How it Changed the World," means that in general, I'm a reductionist, in that I believe almost all phenomena are reducible to basic mathema...
  • Lightreads
    Dec 28, 2008
    It?s impossible to talk about the history of the brain ? about the history of medicine at large, actually ? without also talking about religion and politics and philosophy. Mostly religion, as you might expect. This book tackles all of the above with admirable aplomb, starting of...
  • Kaara
    Jan 13, 2009
    I picked this up off the shelves at work where we keep books sent to us for our organization's magazine to review but that we ignored. I was really impressed by it. It's a history of the discovery of our nervous system (and many other anatomical and scientic systems), but it's rendered...
  • Cassandra Kay Silva
    Jun 28, 2011
    Great author, lots of wonderful history here. Not so much information about the brain, but lots of insight into what scientist in the 1600's were seeing and experimenting with as they tried to find the location of the human soul. It follows Willis mainly and includes a number of his or...
  • Lissa Notreallywolf
    Sep 01, 2014
    This is largely devoted to the study of Willis and his associates who formed one of the contingents of the early Royal Society. Willis is the father of neurology and is rarely discussed in anatomy courses or recognized in the history of science. Yet through a number of horrifying exper...
  • Ed
    Jun 02, 2017
    This book presents a broad brush picture of seventeenth century developments in exploration of the relationship of mind and brain. From my research on the main character in Zimmer's book--Thomas Willis--I can say that Zimmer has got most of the facts of the story right. While many will...
  • Toni Moore
    May 22, 2013
    I'm a science nerd, and I really like reading about the brain. I also like reading about the history of science. So this book was a perfect fit for me. Carl Zimmer is an excellent writer. He has a knack for making science understandable for non-scientists without "dumbing down" the ...
  • Nicolas
    Apr 23, 2019
    Brillant résumé ! ...
  • dejah_thoris
    Jul 02, 2013
    Personally, I thought this book was a little closer to two stars, but I've read great books before and after it, so I'm sure I'm biased. Overall, a good work on the development of anatomy and medicine in the early Enlightenment. As for telling the story of the brain, it takes several c...
  • Dave Ciskowski
    Apr 15, 2018
    A solid introduction to the history of the realization of the role of the brain. The book centers on Thomas Willis, the alchemist, physician, and anatomist. His studies, conducted among the early fellows of the Royal Society in seventeenth-century England, cast off a great deal of anci...
  • Martin
    Jul 25, 2011
    I hadn't even thought this was a topic worth reading about, but a friend recommended this book and I had a peek. I was drawn in immediately and amazed at the history I didn't know and was never taught! What's interesting is that it takes about 120 pages to finally get to the gist of th...
  • Kari
    Jul 10, 2011
    This was surprisingly accessible, I was expecting something much more complex but it is aimed as a layman's account which was lucky for me! The story Zimmer told is a fascinating one. He discusses how ideas developed from the ideas of Galen and Plato to the vital work of people like Th...
  • Dustin Hartley
    Jun 07, 2018
    A most excellent book on the history of psychology. ...
  • Megan
    Mar 30, 2018
    Interesting if a bit slow at times. The biographical information on various scientists, alchemists, and philosophers was really interesting, as was seeing human understanding make small leaps slowly adding up to more knowledge. ...
  • Ineffablyschmoo
    Sep 11, 2011
    This book is about Thomas Willis and his compatriots, who in the seventeenth century led the way for a new medical science based in careful observation and experimentation. It's also a book which looks at history, politics and religion, and how these shape the possibility of, and recep...
  • Riley
    Nov 05, 2018
    A wonderful read about the history and discovery of the brain. ...
  • Chris Branch
    Sep 02, 2018
    I?ve enjoyed Zimmer?s books before, and he remains the best science writer I know of who isn?t actually a scientist himself. In this book, he attempts to describe the transition in thinking that happened in the mid to late 1600s, during which alchemy became chemistry and a my...
  • Duane Donecker
    Apr 13, 2012
    I have recently become interested in reading books on medical/disease history and picked this one up based on the look of the cover (I do that a lot) and was presently surprised by this one. Carl Zimmer did some excellent research for this book, my mine interest is United States and...
  • Darnell
    Jul 29, 2017
    Very interesting look into the scientific period where people switched from thinking that the heart was the source of the mind to the brain being the source. Also some good writing on the changes in the scientific method during that time. My only complaint is that there was a little to...
  • Keith
    Jun 14, 2018
    I was expecting more balanced chronology, instead of the strong focus on the late Middle Ages and early modern period. Well written with lots of interesting anecdotes, though. ...
  • Anne
    Jun 30, 2013
    Zimmmer has written an interesting and accessible book that puts medical science in the context of the philosophical and scientific debates of the scientific revolution. Still, for me at least, this will always be the book in which I learned that Descartes was a bit of a dandy who favo...
  • Mark Evans
    May 11, 2018
    The well-told story of the beginnings of what would become modern neurology and the paradigm shift that came with it. ...
  • Xander
    Jul 10, 2017
    In Soul Made Flesh (2003), Zimmer describes the scientific revolution of the 17th century in terms of medicine and psychology. Before the 17th century most of medicine was based on Hippocrates and Galen, which in essence was an explanation for the workings of our bodies and diseases in...
  • Aleš Bednařík
    Apr 23, 2019
    Zaujímavo napísaná kniha - beletristicko-dejepiseckým ?týlom rozpráva príbehy významných lekárov a ?al?ích, ktorí ovplyvnili na?e sú?asné chápanie mozgu. Kniha mapuje najmä 17. storo?ie a Anglicko, kde sa pochopenie ?udskej du?e zásadne menilo. Kniha ukazuje a...