The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914

The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914

During the fateful quarter century leading up to World War I, the climax of a century of rapid, unprecedented change, a privileged few enjoyed Olympian luxury as the underclass was ?heaving in its pain, its power, and its hate.? In The Proud Tower, Barbara W. Tuchman brings the era to vivid life: the decline of the Edwardian aristocracy; the Anarchists of Europe and Americ During the fateful quarter century leading up to World War I, the climax of a century of rapid, unprecedented change,...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914
Author:Barbara W. Tuchman
Rating:
Genres:History
ISBN:The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War 1890-1914
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:588 pages pages

The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914 Reviews

  • Trevor
    Jun 18, 2010
    We humans like to think that there are single moments in our lives and in history around which the rest of history pivots. The point of these pivots is that they explain not only what comes after, but (and not unlike my new reading glasses) also snaps into focus all that went before. S...
  • booklady
    May 26, 2008
    It is understandable that many do not ?get? Tuchman?s The Proud Tower. It is a collection of topics, almost disparate stand-alone essays, which seem to have nothing whatsoever to do with each other. As you finish each chapter and begin the next, you are almost dumped into another...
  • Wes Freeman
    Dec 12, 2008
    Engaging history of white people from late 19th century to WWI. Written by American journalist living in U.K. and published in 1966, book purports to be "A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914" -- which it ain't by a damn sight -- and works as a pretty good oil painting of t...
  • Clif Hostetler
    Dec 09, 2010
    Barbara Tuchman is a widely respected historian, and I have always assumed I'd get around to reading all her books some day (I read two of her books in my pre- Goodreads.com days). I had not previously read The Proud Tower probably because the era prior to World War I is of limited int...
  • Matt
    Aug 24, 2016
    How do you follow up a major success in life? It?s a question I seldom ask myself. My last success was finishing the final two episodes of both The Night Of and Stranger Things in a single night, while drinking a $9 handle of rum and avoiding the sidelong glances of my pregnant w...
  • CD
    Apr 27, 2013
    Tuchman's eight long form essays are a must read as an element in understanding the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries that led to 'the Great War'. The writer grasps and transmits concisely the role of socialism and anarchy to the general unrest and global psychosis th...
  • Mikey B.
    Nov 21, 2012
    This book consists of eight sections, or as the title suggests ? portraits. They are uneven in scope and not that inter-connected. One of the strongest ones is on the Dreyfus affair in France and it is full of passion as one would expect. Ms. Tuchman gives a stupendous view of the...
  • Cera
    Sep 15, 2008
    Tuchman is rightfully famous as a historian, but I found this book disappointing. It's a sound scholarly look at the period 1890-1914, focusing on the social movements within the powerful European nations & the United States that, according to Tuchman, set the stage for the outbrea...
  • Patrick Gibson
    Apr 21, 2009
    1850 is my favorite year. What? You don?t have a favorite year? Sure you do. It is the one you picked during the late night drunken college game of ?What If You Could Go Back in Time Where and When Would You Go?? I could waver a little on my date. 1849 or 1851 would be all right....
  • Jim
    Apr 22, 2009
    It is a thankless job to write a book about the origins of a widespread conflagration such as the First World War. Where is one to draw the line? Where author Barbara Tuchman apparently drew it was the countries of Western Europe -- Britain, France, and Germany -- plus the United State...
  • Kent
    Nov 20, 2009
    I'm hesitating between a simple recommendation: "This was tremendous. Go forth and read ye likewise," and a more voluminous splatter of opinions and unhelpful comments. No, actually, I'm not hesitating. The choice is simple. Tuchman's object is to reveal the last decade or two of...
  • Robert
    Jan 20, 2012
    I finished this book mostly out of moral obligation. You get to read about the anarchists, socialists, and upper 1% right before WWI. The Dreyfus affair was kind of interesting. It was like each, very long, chapter was a book in itself. I was hoping to get insight into Eastern-Europe (...
  • Genia Lukin
    Jul 19, 2012
    Tuchman, as usual, is incisive and sharp in the best sense of these words. The book was not quite as fascinating to me as Guns of August has been, but then, that is really not much of a criticism, as Guns of August is a book one produces once a lifetime. This book surveys the portra...
  • Lawyer
    Dec 17, 2013
    The Proud Tower: Barbara Tuchman's View of the World on the Road to War Channel Firing BY THOMAS HARDY That night your great guns, unawares, Shook all our coffins as we lay, And broke the chancel window-squares, We thought it was the Judgment-day And sat upright. While drear...
  • Kalliope
    Aug 09, 2012
    While from a proud tower in the town Death looks gigantically down The City in the Sea ? Poe. This book is really a collection of essays published separately in various journals. Any book tackling the social, political and artistic situation of the world in the couple...
  • Michael
    May 15, 2014
    I simply love Tuchman?s writing style, which tells stories around various figures and themes relevant to understanding the origins of the First World War. Except in her introduction and final scene on the verge of mobilization of armies she avoids explicit reference to the war becaus...
  • Dan
    May 24, 2012
    This is another outstanding book by Barbara Tuchman. It paints a vivid and fascinating picture of the world in the period before World War 1. I think she manages to avoid the obvious danger of seeing everything through the lens created by our modern perspective, knowing, as we do now, ...
  • Jan-Maat
    Jun 13, 2011
    I remember this as an accessible account of the subject, with nice vignettes like Lord Salisbury being scooted around his garden in his bath chair. ...
  • Rebecca
    Sep 19, 2013
    Back in high school (not for high school, just during), I read A Distant Mirror and was very impressed. So when I saw this on the shelf at the library, I snagged it. This is...an odd book. On the paragraph level, the writing is first rate. The scholarship is excellent. But the overa...
  • Brian Eshleman
    Feb 26, 2016
    I am convinced of that Barbara W. Tuchman could draw lasting principles about the behavior of humanity from a trip to the grocery store and could make understated comments on the folly revealed which are more and more penetrating as time passes. Couple that skill with the transformatio...
  • Tim Robinson
    Sep 12, 2018
    Fascinating, authoritative, relevant, sweeping, insightful, well written, magisterial, and far too long. ...
  • Evan Leach
    May 17, 2013
    In The Proud Tower, historian extraordinaire Barbara Tuchman takes on the 25 years leading up to World War I. Focusing on events in England, France, Germany, the U.S. and (to a lesser extent) the rest of the West from 1890-1914, Tuchman presents eight essays that, taken together, provi...
  • Dan
    Mar 18, 2019
    The Proud Tower by Barbara W. Tuchman Joy, Hope, Suspicion - above all, astonishment - were the world's prevailing emotions when it learned on August 29, 1898, that the young Czar of Russia, Nicholas II, had issued a call to the nations to join in a conference for the limitation of ...
  • Owen
    Jul 14, 2012
    Barbara Tuchman is a very good writer of history. It's one of those situations in which you thank the Lord, or somebody, that this particular person decided to go ahead in this particular direction. I don't know if just anyone will enjoy "The Proud Tower," since it deals with a very pr...
  • Brendan
    Aug 18, 2013
    This book just wasn't very interesting unfortunately. I had thought that that it would be a little more closely connected to the events that eventually led up to the First World War. The section on anarchists was interesting and so was the part about the Dreyfus Affair and the first pe...
  • S.
    Oct 21, 2013
    I've been punching out the four stars lately, but in justification, if the book is a two I usually just let it gather some dust. Even the threes take longer to finish and then I usually find some excuse to delay the write up. Fours I can consume like potato chips.... Munch munch munch....
  • Bryan "goes on a bit too long"
    Jan 29, 2013
    I had looked forward to reading this for quite some time, but now that I have finally gotten around to it, I'm feeling the effect of my high expectations. Tuchman seems best, to me, when she's describing an event, as in The Zimmermann Telegram; and although the individual chapters of T...
  • Kent
    Oct 06, 2018
    Written in 1962 about the period, approximately 1890-1914, leading to the start of WWI. Reading it now is at once surprising, and yet not, that despite the passage of 120+ years, two world wars as well as other numerous conflicts, many of the same issues and fights covered by Barbara T...
  • ALLEN
    Aug 11, 2017
    Not a comprehensive "big-man" history of Europe before World War One, but a series of highly illuminating essays in Barbara Tuchman's inimitable erudite, yet accessible style. Topics include the rise of Socialism and Anarchism; the tug-of-war between the culture of fin-de-siecle Vienna...
  • Jamie
    Jan 08, 2019
    ?See that little stream--we could walk to it in two minutes. It took the British a month to walk to it ? a whole empire walking very slowly, dying in front and pushing forward behind. And another empire walked very slowly backward a few inches a day, leaving the dead like a million...