Purgatorio

Purgatorio

In the early 1300s, Dante Alighieri set out to write the three volumes which make the up The Divine Comedy. Purgatorio is the second volume in this set and opens with Dante the poet picturing Dante the pilgrim coming out of the pit of hell. Similar to the Inferno (34 cantos), this volume is divided into 33 cantos, written in tercets (groups of 3 lines). The English prose i In the early 1300s, Dante Alighieri set out to write the three volumes which make the up The Divine Comedy. Purgatorio is...

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Title:Purgatorio
Author:Dante Alighieri
Rating:
Genres:Classics
ISBN:Purgatorio
ISBN
Edition Language:Italian
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:704 pages pages

Purgatorio Reviews

  • booklady
    Apr 18, 2019
    Interesting interpretation of Purgatory. It was certainly a relief after the Inferno. I want to read it again before writing a review. On to Paradiso. ...
  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    Jul 16, 2008
    Purgatorio = Purgatory (The Divine Comedy, #2), Dante Alighieri Purgatory (Italian: Purgatorio) is the second part of Dante's Divine Comedy, following the Inferno, and preceding the Paradiso. The poem was written in the early 14th century. It is an allegory telling of the climb of Da...
  • Jon
    Mar 02, 2009
    I'm apparently reading the Divine Comedy backwards this time, since I finished the Paradiso on Dec 31, and then read this one for our church faith exploration book club. This is probably the edition I would recommend to anybody trying the Comedy--the notes are thorough (maybe too thoro...
  • Bettie
    Nov 12, 2011
    CDM REVIEW - FINAL: Pooh v Inferno Virgil points out to Pooh where Mary Poppins and Mrs B hang out nowadays - all the rocks were gleamingly clean. ZING The clink of gin bottles with the cackles of laughter indicate a good time was being had by all. Yes, it is a party atomosphere sin...
  • Zach Pickens
    Mar 22, 2012
    After trekking through the depths of hell, Dante, led by his guide and literary father Virgil, ascends the seven storied mountain of purgatory. Like hell, the souls? torments fit the sins that engaged them in life, but unlike hell, the shades are not so much punished as they are purg...
  • Riku Sayuj
    Dec 14, 2016
    Check here for choice of translation: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... More on The Magic Mountain later. ...
  • Manny
    Nov 27, 2008
    For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, Les Trois Mousquetaires (31) versus The Divine Comedy (26) - Welcome to Purgatory. Name, please? - Ah, D'Artagnan. I think there might have been some kind of... - We'll deal with that in a moment. Could we just start by taking c...
  • Laurel Hicks
    Jun 23, 2009
    Beautiful and ingenious. There is much more light and lightness here than in Inferno. And music! ...
  • Julie Davis
    Dec 08, 2015
    Julie is stuck with the Wrathful. Can't see a thing. Which is unfortunate because Scott is no help at all, as he is prostrate with the Ava- the Avarish- er, the greedy. Virgil is still around here somewhere. A Good Story is Hard to Find, Episode 137: Purgatorio by Dante. Original co...
  • Justin Evans
    Jun 14, 2011
    There are two kinds of people who read Dante. The first kind gets all excited about people stuck head down in piles of shit, and wishes that the adulterers and libertines could just keep on doing what they did in the real world, because it's so romantic. The second kind gets all excite...
  • Gary
    Jun 27, 2018
    Wonderful! The imagery is incredible. Read the book THE DANTE CHAMBER by Matthew Pearl with it. Great book. I am so glad that I have finally read this section of THE DIVINE COMEDY. Paradiso is in my future! ...
  • Melanti
    Jan 21, 2017
    Ah! Purgatory! The place where even your normal human thoughts are crimes punishable by torture. I know I said the concept of Hell was weird, but Purgatory's even weirder. Me: God, I'm sorry. I promise. God: Well... Sigh. I suppose I'll forgive you. But, listen. Would you mind i...
  • Algernon (Darth Anyan)
    Mar 17, 2014
    For better waters now the little bark of my indwelling powers raises her sails, and leaves behind that sea so cruel and dark. Now shall I sing that second kingdom given the soul of man wherein to purge its guilt and so grow worthy to ascend to Heaven. If the arhitecture of...
  • Kristine Morris
    Aug 01, 2011
    If Dante knew how hard it would be for modern readers to interpret his Commedia, he would have invoked a beautitude of Jesus sung by the angels just for us...."blessed are those who persevere reading Purgatorio...." Purgatorio is way more complex and interesting than the Infern...
  • Manny
    Sep 20, 2018
    "From those most holy waters I came away remade, as are new plants renewed with new-sprung leaves, pure, and prepared to rise up to the stars." (Purg. XXXIII. 142-145) ...
  • Alyssa
    Jul 30, 2013
    This is my favorite canticle of the Divina Commedia. Sure, it's not as thrilling or fascinatingly grotesque (/grotesquely fascinating) as the Inferno, but the literary images are breathtakingly beautiful, not to mention extremely powerful. As a modern reader, it's hard not to be moved ...
  • Nostalgia Reader
    Aug 17, 2019
    Really a strong 2.5 stars, but despite the sloogggg that was most of the book, it sorta redeemed (heh) itself with the weird surrealness in the last 5 or so cantos to warrant rounding up! ...
  • Matt Pitts
    Aug 13, 2017
    Second read: it?s still my least favorite of the three and the one I stalled out on, but I appreciated it more this time, especially near the end, and added a star. Original review: Dante's vision of purgatory did not capture me quite like his vision of hell. Perhaps that was due ...
  • David Lafferty
    Feb 05, 2013
    "?like people going to visit a great city like Paris and only spending a few days in the sewers?" ...Dorothy Sayers on only reading Inferno and stopping there Purgatorio is my favorite book of the Divine Comedy. While Inferno is the most popular and arguably the most accessible...
  • ἀρχαῖος (arkhaîos)
    May 20, 2016
    In The Inferno, Dante used his many skills of philosophical and theological argument, poetry, knowledge of the classics and the Christian Church to both show his readers the punishments that await them if they do not change their ways, but, also, to carry forth his own political and pe...
  • Stephen P
    Mar 08, 2017
    I wrote down brilliant and original ideas about this classic but left it near candy by my bedside. When I woke up all of it was gone and the dog was wagging her tail(and tale), and looking angelic. ...
  • Dimitris
    Sep 30, 2017
    Wonderfully conceived and superbly written, I can't help but admire Dante's vision and dedication. But - as with his Inferno too - I have failed to acknowledge its universal scope and relevance... For me, it's a Catholic-political allegory about obscure events and minor individuals in...
  • Vanessa J.
    Feb 03, 2015
    My journey continues with Purgatorio. Now that I've finally gotten out of Hell, I come to the place where all the sinners who repented before they died are. Before knowing where I am, I feel uneasiness. "I'm lost", I thought. Gratefully, my sorrow does not last longer, for I found m...
  • Ashley Adams
    Mar 13, 2016
    I thoroughly enjoyed Dante's journey into the land of redemption. The imagery is beautiful and story line engaging. The Hollander and Hollander translation provides helpful summaries to the content of each canto. Also, the Hollanders' notes synthesize hundreds of years of Dantean criti...
  • Helena
    Feb 12, 2018
    Although I enjoyed some parts of this book more than Inferno, some parts rubbed me the wrong way. I don't like the idea of purgatory where you suffer for centuries and you're supposed to like it but again, putting the disagreements to the side, I have to acknowledge a masterpiece when ...
  • Tim Mercer
    Apr 24, 2018
    Enjoyed this more than Inferno. I definitely was more used to the phrasing and also I think the lighter subject matter helps. Dante's imagination is amazing. Also reading as an ebook the constant cross referencing to the notes for translating that particular canto are really useful...
  • Piyangie
    Jun 19, 2018
    The Purgatorio is the second part of Dante's masterpiece, the Divine Comedy. This is where according to Dante the sinners purge their sins by being repentant of the sins they have committed on earth. Unlike in Inferno, purgatory deals with sins more psychological than physical with m...
  • Michael Finocchiaro
    Oct 08, 2016
    This is a great book, but does require the notes to make any sense of it. Hundreds of characters from Dant's Italy not to mention host of mythological and Biblical ones tended to distract me just reading the poetry and appreciating Dante's wonderful descriptions. I have to stop at th...
  • Carlo
    Jun 21, 2018
    Not as good as Inferno and starting to get a bit repetitive. Too many references to contemporary Italian politics which I have no interest in. A highlight was the discussion of love and free will. (Robert Hollander translation 5/5. Princeton Dante project online) ...
  • Alireza Nejati
    Sep 07, 2018
    A real masterpiece, again! Truly well-crafted and the story is incredibly attractive till the end I hope I had read this trilogy sooner ...