The Invisible Girls

The Invisible Girls

Twenty-seven-year-old Sarah Thebarge had it all - a loving boyfriend, an Ivy League degree, and a successful career - when her life was derailed by an unthinkable diagnosis: aggressive breast cancer. After surviving the grueling treatments - though just barely - Sarah moved to Portland, Oregon to start over. There, a chance encounter with an exhausted African mother and he Twenty-seven-year-old Sarah Thebarge had it all - a loving boyfriend, an Ivy League degree, and a successful career - whe...

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Title:The Invisible Girls
Author:Sarah Thebarge
Rating:
Genres:Autobiography
ISBN:1455523917
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:272 pages pages

The Invisible Girls Reviews

  • amelia
    Dec 30, 2014
    Absolutely seeped in self-congratulation and condescension, with no small amount of Christian evangelizing. There's probably a good story in here and a worthwhile cause, but... well, the last line of the book is literally a child telling the author "... when I grow up, I want to be jus...
  • Meghan K
    Mar 04, 2013
    When I read the back of the book - I was intrigued. A young woman, lost in life due to her struggle with cancer, encounters a family of immigrants on a bus. She connects with them and finds common ground with the "invisible girls." It's an uplifting journey for the family and the autho...
  • Laura
    Jan 12, 2019
    Insight into the experience of immigrants. Sarah Thebarge knows what it is like to be invisible after her early encounter with cancer and so she is quick to see the hurt of others. Overall, the memoir feels a bit indulgent as she makes it a story of her own heroism and victimhood. Ther...
  • Jessa
    Aug 30, 2018
    I loved this book, part was so sweet and the other part so inspiring. It was a quick easy read and I would recommend reading this book. So enjoyable and amazing what this author went through. ...
  • Homeschoolmama
    Feb 11, 2013
    Wonderful true story of a young breast cancer survivor who encounters a Somalian family living a below-poverty line existence, and then, together with the help of some friends, reaches out and helps them with some basic needs and forms a familial bond with these "invisible girls' and t...
  • Jennie
    Jan 04, 2015
    I have no doubt that Thebarge means well. However, this memoir is disjointed, self-serving, and completely privilege blind. It is half of the story; a minute glimpse into the plight of a family of Somalian refugees wholly through the lens of a young, American cancer survivor. We get ze...
  • Quiltgranny
    Feb 01, 2013
    I was drawn in by the title of this book, and I must say I am still unclear who exactly Ms. Thebarge means. Is it her, because of her breast cancer diagnosis at an early age; is it the family of Somalians she befriends; or the little girls of that family that are invisible? This was...
  • Sharron
    Jul 08, 2018
    I enjoyed this memoir as an audiobook. Intriguing as it was, a bit heavy on ? woe is me? with the author?s intricate details of her health issues. Would have liked more info about the Somali girls. The fact that the narrator could not properly pronounce mastectomy really grated a...
  • Sara
    Jun 20, 2017
    Many of the reviews complain that the story is too centered on the author herself, when it should have been more about the refugees she took under her wing. I took it at a greater context, that there are invisibles everywhere, even the author, who as a single, young cancer survivor...
  • Anderson
    May 23, 2013
    The book is poignent, funny, and heartbreaking, one of those page-turners that takes you through the emotional spectrum. Sarah weaves together two narratives: her story of being diagnosed at 27 with breast cancer and the treatment that followed, and her subsequent move from Connecticut...
  • Beth
    Apr 18, 2013
    Very mixed feelings about this one; but I think it's well worth the read. This memoir was really three stories, two of them very absorbing and the third...well, for me, not so much. Briefly, a young woman who was raised in a fundamentalist religious home, grows up to far surpass what w...
  • Melanie Griffin
    Sep 17, 2014
    I wanted to like this book, I really did. It was recommended to me by a dear friend who is also a writer, and the topic of immigrants and poverty and spiritual growth are close to my heart. But I can't recommend it. Either the writer is too young to be writing memoir or she is still to...
  • Larry
    Apr 18, 2013
    Sarah Thebarge?s The Invisible Girls: A Memoir is a testament to endurance, hope, and selflessness. Sarah grew up a pastor?s child in a conservative Christian family. As a young adult, her future seemed bright. A bright student, she earned a pair of Ivy League degrees in journalism...
  • Dianne
    Feb 12, 2013
    The Invisible Girls by Sarah Thebarge took my breath away. Sarah told of her life, her pain, and how a chance meeting of a destitute Somali mother and her five daughters, immigrants who helped to heal her soul, spirit and heart. This is a collage of her personal conflict, past and pres...
  • Jeanne
    Feb 25, 2014
    A very touching memoir. The author befriends a family from Somalia who just arrived in Portland, and finds that she needs them as much as they need her. ...
  • Karen ⊰✿
    Feb 08, 2019
    This is really three books in one. There is the story of how Sarah meets a Somali refugee family on a train and immediately feels a connection with them, and so befriends the mother and her five girls and becomes a part of her life. Then there is the flashback story to when, at 27,...
  • Jeanette
    Apr 23, 2013
    A memoir. I seem to be reading more memoirs these days than I have at any other point in my life. Maybe it's because more people are writing them? Or because people are taking memoir more seriously? Or because I'm taking memoir more seriously now that I've hit the wise, old age of 26? ...
  • Leah Good
    Sep 26, 2018
    This book combined two things very relatable to me... 1. Outreach to a family in need of friendship which is something I aspire to and dream of. and 2. A memoir of a cancer journey something I have not experienced personally but have walked out alongside my mom, grandmother, grandfa...
  • Brenda
    Oct 21, 2018
    This book underscores the healing aspect of helping others. I hope you all get a chance to read it. ...
  • Lilly Cannon
    Feb 07, 2013
    I am Strictly in a Love/Like relationship with this book, I Love to like it and i like to love it... phewwwww, where to start? Anyone who has had Cancer, YOU.FRICKIN.ROCK!!!!!!!!!!!! whether they survived or not, to fight something inside you, you could give up and end it quickly...
  • Jenne Glover
    Jan 03, 2015
    The story of a girl who helps a desperate family, and in turn pulls herself out of desperation. I thoroughly enjoyed this story. It takes place in my home town, which of course adds interest. I easily recommend this book! ...
  • Paul Sims
    May 05, 2013
    I read this post from Sarah on a Saturday, ordered the book almost immediately and had it in hand early the next week. Within 36 hours from the time I glanced at the first pages, I'd read the entire thing. I hardly ever do this ?some books take me months to read. A number of th...
  • Lenore
    Apr 10, 2018
    I loved this story. Someone who is suffering reaches out to a Somali refugee family desperately in need of help. A wonderful relationship begins that blesses both of them. ...
  • Sandra Winfrey
    Jul 21, 2018
    A beautiful and heartbreaking memoir that reads like a novel. I could not put it down. I grew to love the story and I?m inspired. ...
  • Luke Taylor
    Apr 27, 2015
    Unflinchingly raw and honest and humbling, it is impossible to read The Invisible Girls with dry eyes. This painful memoir of true loss and gain by Sarah Thebarge deftly balances the ravaging evils of breast cancer with the purity of a woman stretching far beyond her own skin to be a S...
  • Camille Dent
    Jul 03, 2014
    I give this book 2 stars because I appreciate that the proceeds of the book and donations will go to sending the Somali girls to college. The cause is respectable, but the actual book was close to terrible, in my opinion. The writing was so transparent and bland that I read this in les...
  • Tracy Ratike
    Sep 22, 2018
    Great insight into immigrants reality of coming to America. It isn't the free ride to prosperity that a lot people imagine. ...
  • Rebecca McNutt
    Oct 22, 2015
    This book was unlike anything I've ever read before. The Invisible Girls is the story of two women in recovery, one from breast cancer and the other from having to leave her country for an unfamiliar one. They find solace in each other and their friendship is written in a style that's ...
  • Hannah Rodriguez
    Mar 19, 2017
    a lot of mixed feelings about this....... probably more like 3.5 it was a good story with a potential for a really good message but it was pretty fragmented and at times I wished there would have been more of the Somali girls ...
  • Mbgirl
    Sep 20, 2017
    An authentic, well-told memoir about a Biola and Yale-trained PA who survived St3 cancer, dubbing herself an invisible girl, who then encounters more "invisible girls" ( female Somali refugees) on the MAX in Portland. Yes, ironically, this is the same pub transit lightrail whereby an a...