An Italian Education

An Italian Education

Tim Parks' first bestseller, "Italian Neighbors," chronicled his initiation into Italian society and cultural life. Reviewers everywhere hailed it as a bravissimo performance. Now he turns to his children -- born and bred in Italy -- and their milieu in a small village near Verona. With the splendid eye for detail, character, and intrigue that has brought him acclaim as a Tim Parks' first bestseller, "Italian Neighbors," chronicled his initiation into Italian society and cultural life. Review...

DownloadRead Online
Title:An Italian Education
Author:Tim Parks
Rating:
Genres:Cultural
ISBN:0380727609
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:338 pages pages

An Italian Education Reviews

  • Simon
    Aug 01, 2018
    As a fellow Brit who has spent some time living in Italy, married and Italian and raised bilingual kids a lot of this is familiar to me. I?m not sure how it would come across to anyone not in a similar situation. It?s a bit too long, and I could have done without the couple of chap...
  • Kathy
    Mar 10, 2010
    I read this in lieu of Italian Neighbors (a book club pick), which my library does not have. Inexpicably, they did have this book, which is the sequel. I expected a travelogue, along the lines of "A Year in Provence". This book was much better. It is the 7 year story of an Englishm...
  • Elizabeth
    Mar 27, 2008
    This book was an interesting and enjoyable read, although there is an undertone of smug criticism of Italy and Italians throughout the book-- a bit odd since the author is married to an Italian and has lived in Italy for a decade or two. I guess he's a bit like a teenage boy with a big...
  • Lauren
    Sep 03, 2008
    I Love, Love, Love, Love, Love this book! I enjoy the way the author describes the people he encounters and the culture he experiences! I catch myself laughing out loud in recognition of a situation or understanding of a particular situation in a far away land, or just at the situation...
  • Dana Delamar
    Aug 28, 2013
    Very enjoyable book by Tim Parks about what it's like to raise children in Italy. Parks paints a vibrant picture of Italian life in all its mundanity and glory, contrasting it at times to his own childhood in England. I've already ordered his other two books about living in Italy. ...
  • Roberta
    Jul 19, 2012
    Basically boring. ...
  • Jeanne
    Jun 07, 2018
    a little slow at times but very enjoyable..especially the trip to the gravel pit for fishing and his week alone with the cjildren at the beach ...
  • Chesapeake Bae
    Apr 08, 2014
    Don't bother. Park's first book offered charming insights to Italian culture. This tome blithers on about family and neighbors. Nothing new here except a few days at school and the recent history of fascism unable to lay its weary head. His children are both Italian and British. So wha...
  • Dana Nucera
    Jul 09, 2018
    I have mixed feelings about this book. And I think it has something to do with the fact that I am Italian. As the book starts out I found it interesting to hear about the true, everyday life of Italians in Italy. I have never been to Italy, so of course it was informative. It was writt...
  • Sandra
    Aug 02, 2018
    A nice and easy summer read which will make you laugh and reflect on what?s an italian way of bringing up kids. Maybe a bit dated but still fun (and bittersweet) to read. ...
  • Alan
    Oct 28, 2014
    Italian lullabies, like "Ninna Nonna, Ninna O / Questo bimbo, a chi lo do?" Nap my gramma, nap OH, This baby, to whom shall I give? Or Italian recipes, rather imaginative ones (111). Wonderful on Italian contradictions: the assumption that all workers are shiftless, whereas all thieves...
  • June
    Apr 05, 2012
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book, but will say two things...I had already read the author's previous book, Italian Neighbours..in which he and his italian wife buy a flat in a village, and come up against/ make friends with a cast of characters who I instantly I fell in love with. And ri...
  • Allison
    Nov 17, 2011
    Wasn't a big fan of this book. Yes it had its good points but for the most part it was boring. ...
  • Msimone
    Feb 02, 2019
    This book is a follow up to "Italian Neighbors" and it continues to describe the author's interactions with the Italian community he has acquired through marriage and fatherhood. . As usual, the stories of his daily experiences as he navigates living in Italy are so insightful about h...
  • Annieclaus
    Jan 08, 2019
    This is a book of short pieces on life in the Veneto and on the Adriatic coast of Italy. It's full of wonderful characters and Italian vernacular that heads each chapter. The chapters are short, some just a couple of pages, so you can pick this up and put it down whenever you have a fe...
  • Barry Lillie
    Nov 10, 2012
    hard going, droll and lacklustre writing ...
  • Viviana Rizzetto
    Mar 23, 2017
    Nothing great - not bad. I'd say it feels accurate enough, if one keeps in mind that the events took place in 1982 or so. It seems likely that Parks would make some things a little more colourful (also he apparently didn't meet one normal person in the whole town?) but the characte...
  • Pat Morris-jones
    Jun 23, 2018
    I?ve only put 3stars but, actually, it?s a very pleasant read. Ideal for summer when nothing too heavy is fine. I expect he wrote it purely for money but who cares? Not earth shattering but okay. ...
  • Merritt Corrigan
    Dec 28, 2015
    This book was pleasant as a pastry. Tim Parks has such a dry sense of humor, and a profound insight into the Italian psyche. A delightful account of raising children in Italy. Funny, fascinating, and charming! ...
  • Marta
    Jun 10, 2017
    An absolutely phenomenal portrayal of Italian lifestyle, mentality and society. As an Italian who has lived in the U.K for over 6 years now, I have laughed and reflected on everything Tim Parks raises in this collection of essays, which I have dipped in and out of during these busy mon...
  • Kgparkhurst Parkhurst
    Mar 03, 2019
    Delightful Trivia from Italy! Enjoyed this book of day-to-day trivia from Italy. The author is quite divine. Can't wait until I read his next one. ...
  • Aloke
    Jun 01, 2015
    When Parks is at his best you'll be truly whisked into his hot, hilarious, frustrating, delicious, lost in translation Italian world. Following on from his Italian Neighbors, here he covers parenthood as he and his wife raise two kids, Michele and Stefi, in a town near Verona. As i...
  • Kate
    Aug 17, 2018
    Great book. Lots of fun! ...
  • Laurel Barton
    Feb 25, 2018
    If you have lived in Italy... ...this book will ring true and perhaps give words to phenomena you have observed but, like UFOs, could not explain. Parks? insights and experiences are written in an approachable and often amusing manner. Great to pair with his prior book, ? Italia...
  • John Ollerton
    Nov 16, 2017
    Enjoyable book, quite an insight into the Italian view on avoiding chills, scarves in May. ...
  • Garnette
    Apr 24, 2016
    This is the third book I've read about Parks' experiences of life in Italy. He set out to examine Italian culture through the process of raising children, to examine how culture is transmitted so his children emerge as Italian rather than British, or perhaps a creative combination of b...
  • Dario
    Jan 20, 2019
    An interesting and often humorous portrayal of life in Italy. As an Italian, I could relate to many of the quirks, social situations, and settings that Parks details throughout. I do however believe that you?d have to be either an Italian fluent in English or someone who has lived...
  • Alice Harman
    May 21, 2018
    It's well written and perceptive but oh my gaaad so many creepy detailed physical descriptions of teenage girls and 'young mothers'. Barf and a star taken off. ...
  • Dianne Bortoletto
    Oct 11, 2018
    Anything set in Italy usually gets a high rating from me ...
  • Kathy
    Dec 23, 2018
    Parks? insights about Italian family life are hard won. He gains his understanding by observing first hand as a father raising children, and a son-in-law coping with relationships that are bewildering to a British academic. I found his conclusions about the roles of mothers, sacrific...