The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus

The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus

After three decades of investigation, and after traveling hundreds of thousands of miles across the globe-from Melbourne to Moscow, Boston to Beijing-Gingerich has written an utterly original book built on his experience and the remarkable insights gleaned from examining some 600 copies of "De revolutionibus." He found the books owned and annotated by Galileo, Kepler and m After three decades of investigation, and after traveling hundreds of thousands of miles across the globe-from Melbourne ...

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Title:The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus
Author:Owen Gingerich
Rating:
Genres:Science
ISBN:The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:265 pages pages

The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus Reviews

  • Jerzy
    Apr 27, 2007
    There were a few excellent sections on the ways in which Copernicus' De Revolutionibus was accepted, understood, interpreted, etc. by astronomers and the Church. I wish those chapters were organized and tied together in a more cohesive way, so that someone interested in understanding t...
  • Chelsea
    Apr 16, 2011
    I was assigned this book in a class on the Protestant Reformation. Somehow I think the title is going to be oddly prophetic for a majority of students in the class. XD But that's not a knock on the book itself. I actually found it to be quite interesting, although I think it probabl...
  • Jen
    Sep 06, 2009
    After two renewals at the library, I still never got around to reading this book. All I can say is that the title could not be more appropriate. ...
  • Grumpylibrarian
    Aug 19, 2009
    I heard Owen Gingerich speak at the LoC congress on the Waldseemüller Map this spring. He was fascinating. Let's see how the book goes... ...
  • Barbara
    Jan 09, 2008
    A pretty good read. Has a fair amount of "technical jargon". The journey of the author to discover how the "de revolutionibus" written by Copernicus was received by his peers and the cosmological community in general was more enlightening than I had presumed. To think that less than 50...
  • Nathan Albright
    Sep 19, 2017
    The author takes as his title for book a reference from novelist Arthur Koestler [1], who thought that the masterpiece by Copernicus was a worst seller that no one read.  The author, apparently, spent decades proving this was not the case.  This book is the sort of treasure hunt th...
  • Cj
    Mar 21, 2008
    Fascinating look at how knowledge moves through time. ...
  • Bill
    Jun 25, 2018
    This book is about a survey taken by the author of all known copies of Copernicus' book DE REVOLUTIONIBUS. The concept in interesting but the authors ends up bogged down in minutiae. Perhaps the nature of such a survey requires this. I found some of it interesting and some of it tediou...
  • Elizabeth
    Apr 27, 2010
    Delightful essays..... especially the title essay for book lovers. Some others a bit harder to read unless you are very interested. However, he is a delightful author. ...
  • Ross
    Jul 13, 2012
    Another disappointment. I got this book looking for a scientific explanation about how, in detail, Copernicus figured out that the sun is the center of the solar system. This book turned out to be about the author's 40 year 300,000 mile quest to find and examine all of the extant editi...
  • Cassandra Kay Silva
    May 11, 2009
    This was stupid. I was hoping to read more about Copernicus and his work. I was excited because I knew some original manuscript copies were included. Of course you can't see these copies well and the author doesn't tell you the text provided by all these famous men who read this work e...
  • Katie
    May 15, 2014
    This is a weird book to categorize: it's half exploration of the early impact of Copernicus's groundbreaking but extremely complex De revolutionibus and half academic memoir. Gingerich recounts his globetrotting adventures to track down all first and second editions of Copernicus's ill...
  • John
    Aug 01, 2013
    Great memoir by Harvard historian of science, Owen Gingerich. ...
  • Ed
    May 04, 2018
    Gingerich relates his 30 year hunt for all of the copies of Copernicus famous book that Arthur Koestler had said nobody read. Gingerich is not interested in simply finding the books but in reading the annotations in them that give clues to the reception of De revolutionibus. If you enj...
  • Theresa
    Sep 29, 2012
    Most of us modern folks who think we've read De Revolutionibus (in translation) haven't really read the work at all. We've only read the opening theory and not the dense calculations and tables that make up the bulk of the book, which require a specialist's knowledge and in any case ar...
  • Don
    Mar 25, 2015
    Read like a detective novel. Excellent dig! ...
  • Marcel
    Jul 16, 2019
    intriguing ...
  • Scott Kardel
    May 16, 2016
    While I love history of astronomy books, this one isn't high on my list. That isn't to say that Owen Gingerich didn't do an amazing thing. He did. He tracked down nearly every existing first and second edition copy of Nicolaus Copernicus' De revolutionibus (where the famed astronomer p...
  • Rocky
    Jun 19, 2012
    Loved it, I read "books about books" and ran through this on in no time, it had so much fun and interesting information that I would have to read it again to to actually take it all in (and I vary rarely reread a book). ...
  • John
    Jul 20, 2016
    Here's an interesting book for someone looking for an offbeat science story. Gingerich tells the story of how he put together a catalog of all the known first and second editions of Copernicus' "De Revolutionibus." In this book, Copernicus suggests that the earth revolves around the su...
  • Denise Louise
    Sep 27, 2014
    Not a bad book, just not as interesting as expected. I'm sure it was fascinating for the author to travel the world looking for copies of Copernicus' book in historic libraries, but reading about it was not as much fun as it should have been. The end of the book was more interesting, w...
  • William Schram
    Sep 18, 2019
    The Book Nobody Read is an interesting specimen. It was written by Owen Gingerich, a man that devoted a good portion of his life to tracking down all the extant copies of the first and second editions of De Revolutionibus. Obviously, the first thing that leaps out at you is the title i...
  • Stephen Shapiro
    Jul 06, 2013
    Absolutely the best history of science travelogue/detective story there is. ...
  • Pmslax
    Jun 18, 2017
    Joan and I heard the author at the Newberry Library in Chicago then bought his book. He autographed it. I read it. Sold it in the move to 507. ...
  • Voijarisa
    Jul 06, 2018
    In the early portion of this book, an interesting question is asked: How many people actually finished Copernicus' book? The method by which the author attempts to address this question is by examining marginalia, written notes in the margins of the text, to examine how deeply writers ...
  • Dincay Akcoren
    Nov 16, 2018
    The book consist of mostly the authors memories on how he reached and investigated certain De Revolutionibus editions. There are also some information about old books and how to analyze them. This is very little astronomy in this book. ...
  • Peter Reczek
    Jan 11, 2019
    A very dense but fascinating book about the attempts of a historian to catalogue all the existing copies of Copernicus' great De Revolutionibus. Reads like a detective story with very interesting bits about the travels and travails accompanying this quest. ...
  • Jamie
    Jun 21, 2019
    Interesting in parts. I enjoyed the historical bits about Copernicus and other 16th century astronomers, but after a while the anecdotes of Gingerich's travels to various libraries to see yet more editions of De Revolutionibus got a bit tedious - and I like reading about historical det...
  • Dominique Allmon
    Jun 01, 2019
    What a fascinating adventure! Very well written, humorous, biographical account of one man's endeavor to find as many first and second edition copies of Copernicus' opus magnum as possible, to prove that the book that "nobody read" was actually read by some. An annotated copy of "D...
  • Poo1987 Roykaew
    Jun 05, 2009
    This is a triumph of hard work. A vivid, hilarious, elaborated, considerably jargon-free and, above all, humourous book accessible to everyone. The author shows a great deal of his care in details and his effort as an investigator to investigate and reveal the hidden facts of little-kn...