Zen in the Art of Archery

Zen in the Art of Archery

The path to achieving Zen (a balance between the body and the mind) is brilliantly explained by Professor Eugen Herrigel in this timeless account. This book is the result of the author?s six year quest to learn archery in the hands of Japanese Zen masters. It is an honest account of one man?s journey to complete abandonment of ?the self? and the Western principles that we u The path to achieving Zen (a balance between the body and the mind) is brilliantly explained by Professor Eug...

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Title:Zen in the Art of Archery
Author:Eugen Herrigel
Rating:
Genres:Philosophy
ISBN:Zen in der Kunst des Bogenschießens
ISBN
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Mass Market Paperback
Number of Pages:81 pages pages

Zen in the Art of Archery Reviews

  • Greg
    Mar 22, 2009
    A painless book to read. I'm just not into the Zen thing. Reading this book made me realize that I never will be this type of person, I couldn't go through with the ssssssslllllllooooooooowwwwwwwww process of learning each step of something to perfection. I'm sure I'd be a better perso...
  • trivialchemy
    Jan 23, 2010
    I was surprised that I enjoyed this book fairly well. My dad -- who believes that I am an incorrigible materialist, simply because he has wacky pseudo-scientific ideas about quantum mechanics that I am constantly forced to rebut -- sneaked this into my bag when I left after Christmas v...
  • Adrian Colesberry
    Jul 08, 2009
    I read this book either immediately before or immediately after Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. I liked this book very much. The concept of relaxed attention was interesting to me. I remember that for the whole semester after reading this, I would hold books and papers and b...
  • Ken
    Jan 26, 2017
    Maybe it would have helped if I had at least once picked up a genuine bow and arrow (I'm sure I had play ones as a kid... you know, with the suction cups as "points"). Or maybe if I read a little more patiently about breathing, "not being," "not shooting," and all that Zen stuff. It ju...
  • Marshall
    Oct 01, 2008
    A short and simple book about how Zen masters practice archery, and a memoir of the author's archery training in Japan. Become one with the bow, let the arrow shoot itself, that sort of thing. It's interesting to read a book about Zen when it was still very new in the West. It reminded...
  • Erik Graff
    May 10, 2011
    Many persons had recommended this little book over the years of high school and college, it being one of the canon of the counterculture like the novels of Kurt Vonnegut, the meditations of Alan Watts or the more scholarly essays of D.T. Suzuki. I resisted, partly because it was so pop...
  • Ryan
    Apr 13, 2019
    At first, I thought I'd just enjoy reading this book because it would be interesting to see how gurus talk to their followers, but there is a moment in which Herrigel is shooting the bow incorrectly and his master chides him. Herrigel worries that he'll never understand the teaching be...
  • Riku Sayuj
    Sep 18, 2011
    Are we all such helpless and inexperienced beginners with not the slightest clue on how to correct our aims or on how to draw our bowstrings right? This supposedly uplifting book has depressed me amidst its poetry and beauty into a realization that I will probably never 'correct my...
  • Juan
    May 23, 2013
    Ever since my early college days the abstraction apparatus known as western culture seemed to me a useful but essentially flawed way of understanding our place in the world. Zen, when I first met it, seemed to validate Rimbauds "derrangement of the senses" and Blake's "path of excess" ...
  • Annette Abbott
    Mar 10, 2011
    Whenever I take on a new task or start studying something new, I find that this is my "go to" book. More than Zen, it is a book about how being slow and disciplined allows one to master technique. It was assigned to me first as a textbook for art class. The idea is not to just pick up ...
  • Ernie Truman
    Dec 20, 2018
    Nearly two years ago I bought this book with the hopes of reading something that pointed to being the state of "Zen" but could not bring myself to read it. I was not interested in Archery and found it difficult to get into the right mindset to labor on. Nearly two years later I had a n...
  • Renee
    Apr 08, 2015
    I've read books like this before, most of them for a class I think. Most never range more than 100 pages but they never fail to send my brain round in circles trying to really comprehend what I just read. Some bits are more clear than others, I will say, but there are plenty of passage...
  • Jan-Maat
    Oct 04, 2013
    Second review Oh, wow. In Britain Spring may well be here and with spring come the lambs new born, which means that Mothering Sunday is upon us (view spoiler)[ see there is a logic of sorts (hide spoiler)] and naturally due to my bibilophila what better way of making the solemn day t...
  • Annette Fuller
    Jul 30, 2011
    SUM: Eugen Herrigel recounts his interesting experience training under a zen archery master in Japan. As a western man, Herrigel encounters problems with the process of archery, and his journey toward zen is framed in a perspective that a western audience can appreciate and understand....
  • Dan'l Danehy-oakes
    Dec 31, 2017
    I liked this, but wanted to like it more. It might be partly the translation, by R.C.F. Hull, but I suspect that it is the essential German-ness of the writing: heavy and a bit plodding, a disease that affects most of the translated German writers I've read, even Hesse. (Or maybe even ...
  • Mandy Jo
    Sep 12, 2011
    This week?s headline? it happens automagically Why this book? sold on Amazon Which book format? from campus bookstore Primary reading environment? quickly, before shipping Any preconceived notions? struggling to breathe Identify most with? someday, the author Three ...
  • Ties
    Jul 12, 2018
    Combined with the companion book this is sure to inspire. Read it if zen, archery, Japan or mastery in whatever skill is on your mind. ...
  • Emanuele
    Jun 29, 2016
    Ohmmmmmmmmmmmmm ...
  • Shaifali
    Dec 23, 2018
    The book in itself was fine but it was the ideology of zen itself that didn't sit well with me, hence 3 stars. The first three-fourth part of the book till it focuses on the author's journey/struggle to master archery from the lens of zen, the book was interesting and full of 'wisdom'?...
  • Abishek
    Jul 02, 2017
    Zen in the Art of Archery is my first introduction to Zen. Accounts of Herrigel definitely leaves you thinking as to what it means to truly be egoless - focusing on the art or the task at hand, without worrying about the target. ...
  • Hákon Gunnarsson
    Apr 14, 2017
    I can't say I liked this one very much. I know it did have certain power when it was originally published. For example it may be worth pointing out how influential the title has been. Do you see any resemblance with the titles of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry In...
  • Abhi
    Jul 20, 2018
    Zen takes Buddhism a step beyond the simple dictums of Theravada. The feeling I had while reading this was similar to the one I had when I read Jiddu Krishnamurti. The underlying idea is the same but expressed in different ways. With Krishnamurti the idea is to be one with nature a...
  • Eryk Banatt
    Mar 21, 2017
    This book is what The Inner Game of Tennis would have been if it were much shorter, less repetitive, more interesting, harder to read, and told through the vehicle of one person's path to mastery of their craft. With regards to that book, this one is superior in pretty much every way, ...
  • Kirtida Gautam
    Dec 22, 2017
    Books with Master and Pupil theme always work for me. I can hear all the variations of this myth and enjoy them. Again and again. Yet, this book didn't work for me. I failed to see a genuine learning in the voice of the author. It was almost caricaturish. Lately I have also become ...
  • Michele
    Aug 25, 2018
    Short book on archery and mastering zen. ...
  • Helina Sommer
    Apr 22, 2018
    I loved this book! It was interesting and very spiritual. Yes, it was hard to understand sometimes because it is a lot further from my mind. But since I deal with archery myself, I'm definitely going to think about these things when I practice. And in the summer I want to read it again...
  • Rosalind
    Mar 07, 2019
    I found this book very interesting. Though if you want a guide to archery beginners or improvement, not the best to look at. Ii took me a while to read, and its interesting to dip a toe into Zen. Worth a read. Also if you have never watched Japanese archery definitely take few minutes ...
  • Mark Valentine
    Jan 17, 2016
    Even though this short study of zen--[scratch that]--Even though this short study of archery--[scratch that too because it becomes difficult to name--] Even though this short study of the relationship between thought and action, between subject and object, between exertion and idlen...
  • Nicholas Buroker
    Mar 22, 2017
    "observe bamboo for 10 years, become bamboo, then forget everything and paint" ...
  • Liz
    May 12, 2019
    Excellent book! Great look into not only the art of archery but the essence behind other Japanese arts and what it means to be a student and master in life. ...